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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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McClernand (search for this): article 1
h, in the New York papers, contain some matters of interest Col. H. F. Saunders, of the 19th Wisconsin, has been dismissed from the service. About 2,000 soldiers of Pope's army are still straggling about Washington. Pope is to return to that city shortly to testify in the Bull Run defeat case. W. J. Florence, the actor, had been badly injured by being thrown from his horse. We give the following from the dispatches: The Washington correspondent of a Western journal states that Gen. McClernand denies having endorsed the President's emancipation proclamation, and pronounces the statements published in the papers as unqualifiedly false. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to
Whittington (search for this): article 1
s and present the grand antidote to the evil which had been so thoroughly prevalent so free to prevail. There never was a time when the energies of the Church were more loud called for. Already the Church has preserved religion pure and holy and its had not been filled with panderers to public favor. She must continue what she had been, the great conservative element in the nation. The communion service was conducted by Bishops Remper, of Wisconsin, De Laucey, of Western New York; Whittington of Maryland; Bishopric king of Vermont, and others. The large congregation participated in the communion. The right reverend clergy then returned to the House of Bishops, where they organized by electing the Rev. Dr. Creek, of Kentucky, president, and the Rev. Dr. Kendall, of Boston secretary. The Convention held its fourth daily session on Saturday. The attendance was large, and a question of the forms of the Rubric, and of special prayer in reference to the present national em
September 27th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
en and Cumberland, were yesterday attacked by a rebel force and all taken prisoners. The dispatch adds: At the same time a cavalry force, under Colonel McReynolds. Captured the encampment of the rebels bringing away two pieces of artillery, ten wagons and sixty horses and mules. A strong cavalry force, under General Averill, has been sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of Pa.: Hdq'rs Army of the Potomac,Sharpsburg, Sept. 27, 1862. Governor. --I beg to avail myself of a most the first I have had since the recent battles to tender to you my thanks for your wise and energetic action in calling out the militia of Pennsylvania for its defence, when threatened by a numerous and victorious army of the enemy. Fortunately circumstances rendered it impossible for the enemy to set foot upon the soil of Pennsylvania, but the moral support rendered to my army by your action was the less mighty. In the came of my arm
for it, the rebels ought to thank us for giving them a chance to save slavery by resuming their allegiance. The rebels had no more right to demand that we should not use that weapon of welfare than they had to say we should substitute pop-guns for rifled cannon. [Applause and laughter.] As for what Europe thought of the proclamation, he had caused to trouble himself about it.--[Applause and laughter.] England stood ready to take any side of any question in order to injure this country. Mr. Roebuck stated the true reason of this feeling when he said that it was jealousy of our growing power; and in that statement Mr. Mosburk fully represented the British people. All we asked was for Europe to let us alone, and we would take care that Europe did let us alone England might upbraid us for being slow, out she should remember the history of the Crimes They forget the battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than the
Henry J. Raymond (search for this): article 1
He counseled the most cordial support of the Union Democrats, and said that he believed that the Syrathes candidates might carry not only the State, but the city of New York, with a triumphant and overwhelming majority. [Applause.] Hon. Henry J. Raymond followed, in a speech of considerable length, reviewing the position of the North at the present crisis, and showing the necessity of sustaining the Republican Union, ticket in the State, and defeating the Seymour Secession ticket, in order to sustain the Government and put down the rebellion. Mr. Raymond cordially endorsed the emancipation proclamation of the President as a military necessity, and said that, so far from claiming us for it, the rebels ought to thank us for giving them a chance to save slavery by resuming their allegiance. The rebels had no more right to demand that we should not use that weapon of welfare than they had to say we should substitute pop-guns for rifled cannon. [Applause and laughter.] As for wh
egiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was at one time an apprehension that the Northwestern Indiana would make common cause with the Sioux, in rebellin
the ' key in the wood pile,' and carried his Tribune so far as to disgust not only the army bu citizens of the town generally, everybody supposing that Gen. F. was so particularly attached to Sambo as to have no kind of regard for white men at al in a subordinate position, however, abolition Generals have little power for harm. Among the recruits recently arrived for the New York mounted rifles noticed the somewhat famous E. Z. C. Judson. ´╝łNed Buntline,) who had enlisted as a private. Ned was in good spirits and health, and sober, and as full of patriotism as he used to be of a hiskey. His love of adventure will now be gratified on land, as it has been on the sea and if he survives the term of enlistment his literary talent will no doubt be turned to the manufacture of thrilling army tales. From Western Virginia--Stampede of negroes. A letter from Gallipolis, Ohio situated on the river, says 300 runaway negroes from Western Virginia are now in that city. It adds:
September 30th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
r the balance, and then call for 400,000 more to be held in reserve. "A peace must be conquered. Prosecute this war with all energy and an activity which assume that it can only terminate by the utter annihilation of the rebel army, and the destruction of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "Little Mac" don't exactly understand that he has on a victory, and writes him the following assurance of the fact: Washington, D. C., Sept. 30, 1862. Maj. Gen. McClellan, Commanding, &c.: General: Your report of yesterday, giving the results of the battles of South Mountain and Antitain, has been received and submitted to the President. They were not only hard fought battles, but well-earned and decided victories. The valor and endurance of your army in the several conflicts which terminated in the expulsion of the enemy from the loyal State of Maryland, are creditable alike to the troops and to the officers who commanded
nd people not including the wounded.--The Railroad is not The telegraph line has been repaired to General reached on Saturday to the with a large force General early this morning to to-day General of the Batchie river and The retreating. Their is very a large. General a message here from Column a large of wounded. was killed the United States of the sent at 3 P. M., on the following intelligence had bee there. of 40,000 men, attacked Gen. our troops, who manner. was killed at the head of his captured a large number of guns and prisoners. undoubtedly be completely destroyed The New York Herald, on these dispatch and repeats its the Southern States to return to the under Price and Van Dorn had been force in that vicinity, made up Corinth army. brought away from New Orleans and the new After their defeat at the rebels rapidly as possible all the forces they that neighborhood for
Charles J. Faulkner (search for this): article 1
alse. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was at one time an apprehension that the Northwestern Indiana
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