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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Ned Buntline (search for this): article 1
table. Gen. Ferry had too much regard for the ' key in the wood pile,' and carried his Tribune so far as to disgust not only the army bu citizens of the town generally, everybody supposing that Gen. F. was so particularly attached to Sambo as to have no kind of regard for white men at al in a subordinate position, however, abolition Generals have little power for harm. Among the recruits recently arrived for the New York mounted rifles noticed the somewhat famous E. Z. C. Judson. (Ned Buntline,) who had enlisted as a private. Ned was in good spirits and health, and sober, and as full of patriotism as he used to be of a hiskey. His love of adventure will now be gratified on land, as it has been on the sea and if he survives the term of enlistment his literary talent will no doubt be turned to the manufacture of thrilling army tales. From Western Virginia--Stampede of negroes. A letter from Gallipolis, Ohio situated on the river, says 300 runaway negroes from Western V
ernment authority. They seemed to have an idea that the white warriors were all upon the war path against the rebels. Private advises from General McClellan's headquarters assure us that the President's emancipation proclamation is heartily approved by the Union men in Maryland and Virginia, whose only regret expressed is that it does not sooner take effect. In saloons even and in private circles a here drinking is done — the common toast is "Lincoln's proclamation, little McClellan, Burnside, and the Union army." The enthusiasm for these officials is described as very great in this vicinity. Another evidence of the sturdy treason of Lower Maryland is found in the fact that a large exodus of male population there is taking place into Virginia. The lower counties of the State will not be able to furnish more than a fourth part of their quota under the draft. It every male individual of Charles and St. Mary's counties were to be impressed, still the quotas of these two coun
Christian (search for this): article 1
t of disunion, which also threatened to forever divide a united Church. He then proceeded to observe that our country was now contending with one of he most devastating rebellions that ever cursed a nation. He said he would view some of the causes of this crisis.--he would not undertake to consider the political causes. We had, as a nation, by pride and vain boasting. With an our boasting of religions belief there was, verify less real religion in this than in my nation prot to be Christian, in the world. The name of God was profaned the Sabbath was desecrated. Our intellectual men have become refined, religious philosophers. It was no wonder that, in the midst of such a state of things, men sought out methods to avoid the offence of their own actions, and that God's judgments should fall upon us. Corruption had become so common that it was now a matter of course. There were to-day thousands crying to God crying against the practices which have brought all this offering
the spot the negroes succeeded in making their escape. Col. Jadd, of the 106th New York infantry, now stationed at New Creek, Virginia, has been taken to Wheeling, having manifested symptoms of insanity. The Quakers of Illinois are to be subject to the draft, and those who are drafted are to fall in or pay two hundred dollars each. The Governor of Ohio has ordered that the ministers of the Gospel in charge of regular congregations shall be exempt from the draft. Sixty men employed in Colt's armory were among the drafted soldiers in Hartford. The Government ordered their discharge from the military service, and sent them back to the armory. There were one hundred and seventeen deaths in New Orleans during the week ending on the 21st ult., and one of the persons deceased was one hundred and seventeen years old. Fifty-nine men are all that remain of the Second Wisconsin regiment, that left the Stole but little over a year ago nearly eleven hundred strong.
gion pure and holy and its had not been filled with panderers to public favor. She must continue what she had been, the great conservative element in the nation. The communion service was conducted by Bishops Remper, of Wisconsin, De Laucey, of Western New York; Whittington of Maryland; Bishopric king of Vermont, and others. The large congregation participated in the communion. The right reverend clergy then returned to the House of Bishops, where they organized by electing the Rev. Dr. Creek, of Kentucky, president, and the Rev. Dr. Kendall, of Boston secretary. The Convention held its fourth daily session on Saturday. The attendance was large, and a question of the forms of the Rubric, and of special prayer in reference to the present national emergency led to protracted and animated debates.--The feature of the session was the address of Hon. Horatin Seymour candidate for the Governorship of New York, who while favoring a special form of prayer, adjured the Conventi
giments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was at one time an apprehension that the Northwestern Indiana would make common cause with the Sioux, in rebelling against the Government authority. They seemed to have an idea that the white warriors were all upon t
General a message here from Column a large of wounded. was killed the United States of the sent at 3 P. M., on the following intelligence had bee there. of 40,000 men, attacked Gen. our troops, who manner. was killed at the head of his captured a large number of guns and prisoners. undoubtedly be completely destroyed The New York Herald, on these dispatch and repeats its the Southern States to return to the under Price and Van Dorn had been force in that vicinity, made up Corinth army. brought away from New Orleans and the new After their defeat at the rebels rapidly as possible all the forces they that neighborhood for the purpose of a sudden blow at Corinth, overweighting was securing that important. strategic plan for future operations. This on Friday last with forty thousand men, defeated and is a very important one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of
Charles J. Faulkner (search for this): article 1
alse. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was at one time an apprehension that the Northwestern Indiana
r, but are resorting to the old Manassas game of holding a superior force in check by making a bold show of resistance. All the rebel troops in the vicinity of the Blackwater are green conscripts hastily pushed forward, and will hardly stand fire if assailed by our formidable force. Under the able administration of Maj. Gen. Peck the condition of affairs in Suffolk has greatly improved. The soldiers are better cared for and the place generally has become more confident and comfortable. Gen. Ferry had too much regard for the ' key in the wood pile,' and carried his Tribune so far as to disgust not only the army bu citizens of the town generally, everybody supposing that Gen. F. was so particularly attached to Sambo as to have no kind of regard for white men at al in a subordinate position, however, abolition Generals have little power for harm. Among the recruits recently arrived for the New York mounted rifles noticed the somewhat famous E. Z. C. Judson. (Ned Buntline,) who
W. J. Florence (search for this): article 1
received here shows that that is the estimate put upon him by the good people of Frederick, and indeed the whole of Maryland. Affairs in Washington. The Washington dispatches of the 5th, in the New York papers, contain some matters of interest Col. H. F. Saunders, of the 19th Wisconsin, has been dismissed from the service. About 2,000 soldiers of Pope's army are still straggling about Washington. Pope is to return to that city shortly to testify in the Bull Run defeat case. W. J. Florence, the actor, had been badly injured by being thrown from his horse. We give the following from the dispatches: The Washington correspondent of a Western journal states that Gen. McClernand denies having endorsed the President's emancipation proclamation, and pronounces the statements published in the papers as unqualifiedly false. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regime
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