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George B. McClellan (search for this): article 1
ce Washington. These prisoners From McClellan's army. A dispatch from McClellan's headeen sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of ery respectfully and sincerely, yours, George B. McClellan, Major-General, U. S. Army. Sous said that he is perfectly satisfied with Gen. McClellan and his army. He passed two days and nigh to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreetst the rebels. Private advises from General McClellan's headquarters assure us that the Presidmon toast is "Lincoln's proclamation, little McClellan, Burnside, and the Union army." The enthusian of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "L Washington, D. C., Sept. 30, 1862. Maj. Gen. McClellan, Commanding, &c.: General: Your re living. H. W. Halleck Gen. in-Chief. Gen. McClellan has issued an order against pillaging, as [1 more...]
McClernand (search for this): article 1
h, in the New York papers, contain some matters of interest Col. H. F. Saunders, of the 19th Wisconsin, has been dismissed from the service. About 2,000 soldiers of Pope's army are still straggling about Washington. Pope is to return to that city shortly to testify in the Bull Run defeat case. W. J. Florence, the actor, had been badly injured by being thrown from his horse. We give the following from the dispatches: The Washington correspondent of a Western journal states that Gen. McClernand denies having endorsed the President's emancipation proclamation, and pronounces the statements published in the papers as unqualifiedly false. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to
McCloskey (search for this): article 1
dering citizens with impurity. We trust that Gen. Banks will promptly send after them a body of cavalry with instructions to shoot or hang them on the spot where caught. Just prior to the visit paid to Warrenton by our forces, the Confederate authorities in anticipation of the away every negro in the neighborhood, slave or free, to a portion of The Northern Episcopal Convention. The opening discourse of this body, which is still in session at New York, was delivered by Bishop McCloskey, of Michigan. He began by observing that this was a sad day. Our country was now engaged in an unhappy contest. He referred to the last general convention of the Church and the happy hours which the brothen of the Church then enjoyed the only dark shade in the picture being the threat of disunion, which also threatened to forever divide a united Church. He then proceeded to observe that our country was now contending with one of he most devastating rebellions that ever cursed
McReynolds (search for this): article 1
ast, who without the resistance. Col. the captured regiment, is of the Confederate Peace Washington. These prisoners From McClellan's army. A dispatch from McClellan's headquarters, dated the says that a company of the 54th Pennsylvania, who were guarding the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Pan-Pan, about half way between and Cumberland, were yesterday attacked by a rebel force and all taken prisoners. The dispatch adds: At the same time a cavalry force, under Colonel McReynolds. Captured the encampment of the rebels bringing away two pieces of artillery, ten wagons and sixty horses and mules. A strong cavalry force, under General Averill, has been sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of Pa.: Hdq'rs Army of the Potomac,Sharpsburg, Sept. 27, 1862. Governor. --I beg to avail myself of a most the first I have had since the recent battles to tender to you my thanks for your wise and energetic
George W. Morgan (search for this): article 1
Many graves are torn up, and tomo-stones and monuments thrown down. The stern necessities and terrible realities of war surround and press upon us. The invader a Legislature meets to-day at Danville.--We are concerned about the safety of General G. W. Morgan's command. He abandoned the Gap on the 25th. The Journal to-day says the Government should proceed to draft at once for the balance, and then call for 400,000 more to be held in reserve. "A peace must be conquered. Prosecute this wss of the enemy was at least 1,200 in killed and wounded, and 1,000 prisoners, among whom were Col. Mabree. First Texas Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel Gilmore, commanding Third Louisiana infantry; seven Captains and eighteen Lieutenants. Gen. George W. Morgan, with his entire force in good health, and with all his artillery and trains, arrived at Greensburg, Ky., on the Ohio river, fifteen miles from Portsmouth, on Friday evening. An affray occurred in New York Sunday morning between a nu
John Morgan (search for this): article 1
nt one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forces in Arkansa West--reported defeat of --the battle in &C. A dispatch Portsmouth, Ohio, says that Gen. John Morgan, with 1,000 Confederates, was defeated by the county Home Guard, at Olive Hill, Ky., . It says: After several skirmishing Morgan was several of his men killed. Morgan then retreated toward the river, burning thirty on his way. Last night Morgan Meanwhile Col. went and broughMorgan then retreated toward the river, burning thirty on his way. Last night Morgan Meanwhile Col. went and brought up 300 of the 117th A dispatch Louisville says the Confederate, had evacuated Baldstown, Ky., on the evening of the 4th instant, and it was shortly after by the Federal of corps. The disMorgan Meanwhile Col. went and brought up 300 of the 117th A dispatch Louisville says the Confederate, had evacuated Baldstown, Ky., on the evening of the 4th instant, and it was shortly after by the Federal of corps. The dispatch, which is dated the 5th, says: A has been prevalent here that General was attached by Kirby Smith a rebel force, at to-day, and driven This last is entirely dis Danville for Lex
re right to demand that we should not use that weapon of welfare than they had to say we should substitute pop-guns for rifled cannon. [Applause and laughter.] As for what Europe thought of the proclamation, he had caused to trouble himself about it.--[Applause and laughter.] England stood ready to take any side of any question in order to injure this country. Mr. Roebuck stated the true reason of this feeling when he said that it was jealousy of our growing power; and in that statement Mr. Mosburk fully represented the British people. All we asked was for Europe to let us alone, and we would take care that Europe did let us alone England might upbraid us for being slow, out she should remember the history of the Crimes They forget the battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than they originally landed. We had fought better than the Allies in the Crimes, and should fight it out regardless of what Europe said
the ' key in the wood pile,' and carried his Tribune so far as to disgust not only the army bu citizens of the town generally, everybody supposing that Gen. F. was so particularly attached to Sambo as to have no kind of regard for white men at al in a subordinate position, however, abolition Generals have little power for harm. Among the recruits recently arrived for the New York mounted rifles noticed the somewhat famous E. Z. C. Judson. ´╝łNed Buntline,) who had enlisted as a private. Ned was in good spirits and health, and sober, and as full of patriotism as he used to be of a hiskey. His love of adventure will now be gratified on land, as it has been on the sea and if he survives the term of enlistment his literary talent will no doubt be turned to the manufacture of thrilling army tales. From Western Virginia--Stampede of negroes. A letter from Gallipolis, Ohio situated on the river, says 300 runaway negroes from Western Virginia are now in that city. It adds:
T. A. R. Nelson (search for this): article 1
ing men into their ranks under the Conscription law of the Southern Confederacy. From Louisville. A letter from Louisville, dated the 1st, says that Bull Nelson was buried there the day before, with great pump, his coffin being mounted with massive silver ornaments and enveloped in "his country's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other division officers of the Army of the Ohio. Generals D. and Boyle are to command divisions. General Rousseau's splendid division, comprising thereon regiments o
e in full pursuit." A dispatch the 5th, says: On Saturday morning General Price, attacked General right, while Generals with great determination. At was penetrated and the Corinth House, near the centre They at the point of the bayonet.--General his column over an abatts on the yards of They at the time to a scathing and driven back by a The half past 11, when the the Batchie river. The died and wounded on either side Gen. was killed and Gen. Oglesby was wounded. Colonels Smith, are wounded. larger than ours. We have taken between seven hundred and other thousand people not including the wounded.--The Railroad is not The telegraph line has been repaired to General reached on Saturday to the with a large force General early this morning to to-day General of the Batchie river and The retreating. Their is very a large. General a message here from Column a large of wounded. was killed
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