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Whittington (search for this): article 1
s and present the grand antidote to the evil which had been so thoroughly prevalent so free to prevail. There never was a time when the energies of the Church were more loud called for. Already the Church has preserved religion pure and holy and its had not been filled with panderers to public favor. She must continue what she had been, the great conservative element in the nation. The communion service was conducted by Bishops Remper, of Wisconsin, De Laucey, of Western New York; Whittington of Maryland; Bishopric king of Vermont, and others. The large congregation participated in the communion. The right reverend clergy then returned to the House of Bishops, where they organized by electing the Rev. Dr. Creek, of Kentucky, president, and the Rev. Dr. Kendall, of Boston secretary. The Convention held its fourth daily session on Saturday. The attendance was large, and a question of the forms of the Rubric, and of special prayer in reference to the present national em
Washington (search for this): article 1
Union of ours, and I also return thanks not only to the soldiers, but to the good citizens of Maryland, and to all the good men and women in this land, for their devotion to our glorious cause. I say this without any in my heart to those who may have done otherwise. May our children and our children's children, to a thousand generations, continue to enjoy the benefits conferred upon us by a united country, and have cause yet to rejoice under those glorious institutions bequeathed us by Washington and his compeers. Now, my friends soldiers and citizens, I can only say once more, farewell. At the conclusion of this speech, which was delivered standing at the end of the car, the President entered amid the acclamations of the crowd, and the train moved off. Once again he appeared, waving his hat, and continued doing so until the train was lost in the distance. "Three cheers for the hope of America," was called out by one stentorian voice in front of Mrs. Ramsey's house, and
James S. Wadsworth (search for this): article 1
g to surrender it our own free choice to a tyranny more odious and far more fanatical. The very fact of such a man as Wadsworth being offered as candidate for Governor of this State speaks volumes of our retrograde movement, and indicates the fearn, once so American eyes, is no longer regarded as better than the prophecies of an old almanac. The antecedents of Gen. Wadsworth are well known. be elected Governor of this State, and no man's his or property will be worth three months purchasers. Of course, the proper punishment of a traitor is death, with the confiscation of his property. Those who vote for Wadsworth will therefore vote for the destruction of the lives and property, real and personal, of had their fellow-citizens of t ready to follow their fate it the country demanded it. Platform of the Government party at the North. Gen. James S. Wadsworth, the Republican nominee for Governor of New York and at present Military Governor of Washington, D. C., has writ
ry's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other division officers of the Army of the Ohio. Generals D. and Boyle are to command divisions. General Rousseau's splendid division, comprising thereon regiments of about 6,200 men, and four batteries, paraded our streets yesterday. Latest papers from Nashville date the 23d.--Nashville was then in our possession. Fully 200,000 letters for Buell's army are said to have accumulated at Louisville, and 30,000 letters to have been sent yesterday from this post of
Erie (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
nder. The New York Stock Market. The New York Herald, of the 6th, says there was no abatement of speculative excitement on Saturday, and adds: At the first board there was an advance of 3 per cent in Missouri 6 s, and 2 per cent. in Erie old, other descriptions being firm at the highest quotations of Friday evening. In the afternoon there was a rush to realize profits which led to a decline of 2 per cent. in Erie preferred, ½ in Illinois Central, and 1a1½ in other active shares. Erie preferred, ½ in Illinois Central, and 1a1½ in other active shares. After this decline new buyers came in, and the market closed firm at an advance of ½a1 per cent. from the lowest prices of the day. An active demand for money was created by the speculation in stocks, and the regular lenders on stocks disposed of all their means at an early hour at 5 per cent., after which some loans were effected at 6. Exchange closed at 135½, gold rose to 12¼ and demand notes to 119¼. Miscellaneous. The latest letters from Mississippi represent the national loss i
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
their defeat at the rebels rapidly as possible all the forces they that neighborhood for the purpose of a sudden blow at Corinth, overweighting was securing that important. strategic plan for future operations. This on Friday last with forty thousand men, defeated and is a very important one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forces in Arkansas, and Lee's troops the Virginia. Thus the is Now with a million of fresh men in the what is there for the rebels. The President given them ninety days for reflection Generals, with repeated blows, will of the of remaining in rebellion. --Let us that a second thought will come over the the portion of the their senses time to of the amnesty promised them in proclamation. A correspondent of the New York Herald, writing on the says: Major General now commands
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Marervation of order and discipline, instead of suffering our men to go about in small parties, lawlessly depredating upon their property." Reflections on old Abe's visit to the army. A correspondent of the New York Times, writing from Harper's Ferry about the visit of Lincoln to the army, laments the great change in it since the visit to Harrison's Landing. He says: Of some of the probable objects of the President's visit here, it is best not to speak. Among the reasons he had fo
Charles county (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
inking is done — the common toast is "Lincoln's proclamation, little McClellan, Burnside, and the Union army." The enthusiasm for these officials is described as very great in this vicinity. Another evidence of the sturdy treason of Lower Maryland is found in the fact that a large exodus of male population there is taking place into Virginia. The lower counties of the State will not be able to furnish more than a fourth part of their quota under the draft. It every male individual of Charles and St. Mary's counties were to be impressed, still the quotas of these two counties would remain unfilled. Most of the young men of this region are now serving in the rebel army. Geo. D. Spencer, an officer of the Criminal Court of this district, was to- day by order of Chief Detective Baker, on the charge of disloyalty. In conversation he endorsed the action of the rebel Government in raising the black flag, and said it should have been done long ago. He will be sent to the Old Ca
St. Marys county (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
he common toast is "Lincoln's proclamation, little McClellan, Burnside, and the Union army." The enthusiasm for these officials is described as very great in this vicinity. Another evidence of the sturdy treason of Lower Maryland is found in the fact that a large exodus of male population there is taking place into Virginia. The lower counties of the State will not be able to furnish more than a fourth part of their quota under the draft. It every male individual of Charles and St. Mary's counties were to be impressed, still the quotas of these two counties would remain unfilled. Most of the young men of this region are now serving in the rebel army. Geo. D. Spencer, an officer of the Criminal Court of this district, was to- day by order of Chief Detective Baker, on the charge of disloyalty. In conversation he endorsed the action of the rebel Government in raising the black flag, and said it should have been done long ago. He will be sent to the Old Capitol prison.
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
f Tennessee, is said to assert that Bragg has only 25,000, with which he frightened Buell and the Generals in command at Louisville. The invader's scout for pickets are within twelve miles of the city. Our inner line of trenches is within the corporation limits, and crosses our once beautiful cemetery Many graves are torn up, and tomo-stones and monuments thrown down. The stern necessities and terrible realities of war surround and press upon us. The invader a Legislature meets to-day at Danville.--We are concerned about the safety of General G. W. Morgan's command. He abandoned the Gap on the 25th. The Journal to-day says the Government should proceed to draft at once for the balance, and then call for 400,000 more to be held in reserve. "A peace must be conquered. Prosecute this war with all energy and an activity which assume that it can only terminate by the utter annihilation of the rebel army, and the destruction of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan.
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