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for it, the rebels ought to thank us for giving them a chance to save slavery by resuming their allegiance. The rebels had no more right to demand that we should not use that weapon of welfare than they had to say we should substitute pop-guns for rifled cannon. [Applause and laughter.] As for what Europe thought of the proclamation, he had caused to trouble himself about it.--[Applause and laughter.] England stood ready to take any side of any question in order to injure this country. Mr. Roebuck stated the true reason of this feeling when he said that it was jealousy of our growing power; and in that statement Mr. Mosburk fully represented the British people. All we asked was for Europe to let us alone, and we would take care that Europe did let us alone England might upbraid us for being slow, out she should remember the history of the Crimes They forget the battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than the
Whittington (search for this): article 1
s and present the grand antidote to the evil which had been so thoroughly prevalent so free to prevail. There never was a time when the energies of the Church were more loud called for. Already the Church has preserved religion pure and holy and its had not been filled with panderers to public favor. She must continue what she had been, the great conservative element in the nation. The communion service was conducted by Bishops Remper, of Wisconsin, De Laucey, of Western New York; Whittington of Maryland; Bishopric king of Vermont, and others. The large congregation participated in the communion. The right reverend clergy then returned to the House of Bishops, where they organized by electing the Rev. Dr. Creek, of Kentucky, president, and the Rev. Dr. Kendall, of Boston secretary. The Convention held its fourth daily session on Saturday. The attendance was large, and a question of the forms of the Rubric, and of special prayer in reference to the present national em
eighteen Lieutenants. Gen. George W. Morgan, with his entire force in good health, and with all his artillery and trains, arrived at Greensburg, Ky., on the Ohio river, fifteen miles from Portsmouth, on Friday evening. An affray occurred in New York Sunday morning between a number of white men and negroes, which resulted in the killing of one white man and the seriously wounding of another. Before the police arrived on the spot the negroes succeeded in making their escape. Col. Jadd, of the 106th New York infantry, now stationed at New Creek, Virginia, has been taken to Wheeling, having manifested symptoms of insanity. The Quakers of Illinois are to be subject to the draft, and those who are drafted are to fall in or pay two hundred dollars each. The Governor of Ohio has ordered that the ministers of the Gospel in charge of regular congregations shall be exempt from the draft. Sixty men employed in Colt's armory were among the drafted soldiers in Hartfo
George B. McClellan (search for this): article 1
ce Washington. These prisoners From McClellan's army. A dispatch from McClellan's headeen sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of ery respectfully and sincerely, yours, George B. McClellan, Major-General, U. S. Army. Sous said that he is perfectly satisfied with Gen. McClellan and his army. He passed two days and nigh to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreetst the rebels. Private advises from General McClellan's headquarters assure us that the Presidmon toast is "Lincoln's proclamation, little McClellan, Burnside, and the Union army." The enthusian of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "L Washington, D. C., Sept. 30, 1862. Maj. Gen. McClellan, Commanding, &c.: General: Your re living. H. W. Halleck Gen. in-Chief. Gen. McClellan has issued an order against pillaging, as [1 more...]
ry's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafting. On more than one battle field he was his gallant reported that General Buell retains his command on the recommendation of General Thomas and nearly all the other division officers of the Army of the Ohio. Generals D. and Boyle are to command divisions. General Rousseau's splendid division, comprising thereon regiments of about 6,200 men, and four batteries, paraded our streets yesterday. Latest papers from Nashville date the 23d.--Nashville was then in our possession. Fully 200,000 letters for Buell's army are said to have accumulated at Louisville, and 30,000 letters to have been sent yesterday from this post of
egiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was at one time an apprehension that the Northwestern Indiana would make common cause with the Sioux, in rebellin
, is of the Confederate Peace Washington. These prisoners From McClellan's army. A dispatch from McClellan's headquarters, dated the says that a company of the 54th Pennsylvania, who were guarding the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Pan-Pan, about half way between and Cumberland, were yesterday attacked by a rebel force and all taken prisoners. The dispatch adds: At the same time a cavalry force, under Colonel McReynolds. Captured the encampment of the rebels bringing awaPan, about half way between and Cumberland, were yesterday attacked by a rebel force and all taken prisoners. The dispatch adds: At the same time a cavalry force, under Colonel McReynolds. Captured the encampment of the rebels bringing away two pieces of artillery, ten wagons and sixty horses and mules. A strong cavalry force, under General Averill, has been sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of Pa.: Hdq'rs Army of the Potomac,Sharpsburg, Sept. 27, 1862. Governor. --I beg to avail myself of a most the first I have had since the recent battles to tender to you my thanks for your wise and energetic action in calling out the militia of Pennsylvania for its def
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 1
mphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forces in Arkansas, and Lee's troops the Virginia. Thus the is Now with a million of fresh men in the what is there for the rebels. The President given them ninety days for reflectiother regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports
of all measures aimed at the rebellion, were referred to appropriate committees, instructed to report on Thursday next. The red flannel badge. The following paragraph is from the Baltimore American: Some time since the lamented General Kearney ordered his officers to wear, sewed on their caps, a square bit of red flannel, that he might the more easily recognise them. They have determined to adopt this red badge as an honorary distinction, and their now commander General Stoneman, approves of it. Field and staff officers wear it on the crown of their caps, line officers on the front of their caps, and privates on the right side. In the next fight in which they may be engaged, Kearney's men, with their badge, will avenge their beloved commander. The New York Stock Market. The New York Herald, of the 6th, says there was no abatement of speculative excitement on Saturday, and adds: At the first board there was an advance of 3 per cent in Missouri 6 s, and 2
W. H. Polk (search for this): article 1
and Boyle are to command divisions. General Rousseau's splendid division, comprising thereon regiments of about 6,200 men, and four batteries, paraded our streets yesterday. Latest papers from Nashville date the 23d.--Nashville was then in our possession. Fully 200,000 letters for Buell's army are said to have accumulated at Louisville, and 30,000 letters to have been sent yesterday from this post office. The rebel army in Kentucky is now computed at about 80,000. However, Col. W. H. Polk, of Tennessee, is said to assert that Bragg has only 25,000, with which he frightened Buell and the Generals in command at Louisville. The invader's scout for pickets are within twelve miles of the city. Our inner line of trenches is within the corporation limits, and crosses our once beautiful cemetery Many graves are torn up, and tomo-stones and monuments thrown down. The stern necessities and terrible realities of war surround and press upon us. The invader a Legislature meets to-
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