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E. Z. C. Judson (search for this): article 1
fident and comfortable. Gen. Ferry had too much regard for the ' key in the wood pile,' and carried his Tribune so far as to disgust not only the army bu citizens of the town generally, everybody supposing that Gen. F. was so particularly attached to Sambo as to have no kind of regard for white men at al in a subordinate position, however, abolition Generals have little power for harm. Among the recruits recently arrived for the New York mounted rifles noticed the somewhat famous E. Z. C. Judson. (Ned Buntline,) who had enlisted as a private. Ned was in good spirits and health, and sober, and as full of patriotism as he used to be of a hiskey. His love of adventure will now be gratified on land, as it has been on the sea and if he survives the term of enlistment his literary talent will no doubt be turned to the manufacture of thrilling army tales. From Western Virginia--Stampede of negroes. A letter from Gallipolis, Ohio situated on the river, says 300 runaway negr
McReynolds (search for this): article 1
ast, who without the resistance. Col. the captured regiment, is of the Confederate Peace Washington. These prisoners From McClellan's army. A dispatch from McClellan's headquarters, dated the says that a company of the 54th Pennsylvania, who were guarding the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Pan-Pan, about half way between and Cumberland, were yesterday attacked by a rebel force and all taken prisoners. The dispatch adds: At the same time a cavalry force, under Colonel McReynolds. Captured the encampment of the rebels bringing away two pieces of artillery, ten wagons and sixty horses and mules. A strong cavalry force, under General Averill, has been sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of Pa.: Hdq'rs Army of the Potomac,Sharpsburg, Sept. 27, 1862. Governor. --I beg to avail myself of a most the first I have had since the recent battles to tender to you my thanks for your wise and energetic
Francis Lambert (search for this): article 1
battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than they originally landed. We had fought better than the Allies in the Crimes, and should fight it out regardless of what Europe said [Applause.] Our first duty in sustaining the Government was to sustain its friends in the State canvass — the nominees of the Syracuse Convention on the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting adjourned. The difficulty with Gen. Sigel. The Washington Star announces officially that Gen. Sigel but requested to be relieved from his command. This man is, next to the leader of the German in the United States. with the failure to assign to his corps certain regiments recently raised which the Governors of the States in which they were raised promised to pend to him. No such agreement or arrangement between those functionaries and Gen. Sigel could
lation in stocks, and the regular lenders on stocks disposed of all their means at an early hour at 5 per cent., after which some loans were effected at 6. Exchange closed at 135½, gold rose to 12¼ and demand notes to 119¼. Miscellaneous. The latest letters from Mississippi represent the national loss in the battle of Lukas at 148 killed, 170 wounded, and 94 missing. Total 312. The loss of the enemy was at least 1,200 in killed and wounded, and 1,000 prisoners, among whom were Col. Mabree. First Texas Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel Gilmore, commanding Third Louisiana infantry; seven Captains and eighteen Lieutenants. Gen. George W. Morgan, with his entire force in good health, and with all his artillery and trains, arrived at Greensburg, Ky., on the Ohio river, fifteen miles from Portsmouth, on Friday evening. An affray occurred in New York Sunday morning between a number of white men and negroes, which resulted in the killing of one white man and the seriously wound
uyandotte, and have endeavored to capture some steamboats loaded with Government stores, but as have not been able either in capture any boats or prevent the navigation of a small boats running between here and Portsmouth. Squads of cavalry are moving over all this part of the State engaged in stealing horses, forage, &c., and forcing men into their ranks under the Conscription law of the Southern Confederacy. From Louisville. A letter from Louisville, dated the 1st, says that Bull Nelson was buried there the day before, with great pump, his coffin being mounted with massive silver ornaments and enveloped in "his country's flag" The letter says: Major General Buell yesterday announced the death of Major General Nelson in feeling and befitting terms. History will honor Gen. Nelson as one of the first to organize, by his own individual exertions, a military force in Kentucky, his native State, to rescue here from the vortex of rebellion, toward which she was crafti
is there more to dispute any advance from our side than to make any demonstration upon our position. The fact seems to be that the rebels are terribly scared in this quarter, but are resorting to the old Manassas game of holding a superior force in check by making a bold show of resistance. All the rebel troops in the vicinity of the Blackwater are green conscripts hastily pushed forward, and will hardly stand fire if assailed by our formidable force. Under the able administration of Maj. Gen. Peck the condition of affairs in Suffolk has greatly improved. The soldiers are better cared for and the place generally has become more confident and comfortable. Gen. Ferry had too much regard for the ' key in the wood pile,' and carried his Tribune so far as to disgust not only the army bu citizens of the town generally, everybody supposing that Gen. F. was so particularly attached to Sambo as to have no kind of regard for white men at al in a subordinate position, however, abolition Ge
t and great movements are to result." It is said that he is perfectly satisfied with Gen. McClellan and his army. He passed two days and nights will the General, and had a full and frank understanding with him. The correspondent of the New York Times gives a description of the guerilla's visit to Frederick, and his "model" speeches on the occasion: The party entered Frederick by Patrick street, passed through Court and Church streets, and then stopped at Mrs. Ramsey's house, to see Gen. Hartson who was wounded at Antietam. Here the President, being called on, made the following speech. "In my present position it is hardly proper for me to make speeches. Every word is so closely noted that it will not do to make trivial ones, and I cannot be expected to be prepared to make a matured on just now. It as I have been most of my life. I might, perhaps talk amusing to you for half an hour and it wouldn't hurt anybody, but as it is. I can only return you my sincere thanks for
Christian (search for this): article 1
t of disunion, which also threatened to forever divide a united Church. He then proceeded to observe that our country was now contending with one of he most devastating rebellions that ever cursed a nation. He said he would view some of the causes of this crisis.--he would not undertake to consider the political causes. We had, as a nation, by pride and vain boasting. With an our boasting of religions belief there was, verify less real religion in this than in my nation prot to be Christian, in the world. The name of God was profaned the Sabbath was desecrated. Our intellectual men have become refined, religious philosophers. It was no wonder that, in the midst of such a state of things, men sought out methods to avoid the offence of their own actions, and that God's judgments should fall upon us. Corruption had become so common that it was now a matter of course. There were to-day thousands crying to God crying against the practices which have brought all this offering
Washington (search for this): article 1
Union of ours, and I also return thanks not only to the soldiers, but to the good citizens of Maryland, and to all the good men and women in this land, for their devotion to our glorious cause. I say this without any in my heart to those who may have done otherwise. May our children and our children's children, to a thousand generations, continue to enjoy the benefits conferred upon us by a united country, and have cause yet to rejoice under those glorious institutions bequeathed us by Washington and his compeers. Now, my friends soldiers and citizens, I can only say once more, farewell. At the conclusion of this speech, which was delivered standing at the end of the car, the President entered amid the acclamations of the crowd, and the train moved off. Once again he appeared, waving his hat, and continued doing so until the train was lost in the distance. "Three cheers for the hope of America," was called out by one stentorian voice in front of Mrs. Ramsey's house, and
s on stocks disposed of all their means at an early hour at 5 per cent., after which some loans were effected at 6. Exchange closed at 135½, gold rose to 12¼ and demand notes to 119¼. Miscellaneous. The latest letters from Mississippi represent the national loss in the battle of Lukas at 148 killed, 170 wounded, and 94 missing. Total 312. The loss of the enemy was at least 1,200 in killed and wounded, and 1,000 prisoners, among whom were Col. Mabree. First Texas Legion, Lieutenant-Colonel Gilmore, commanding Third Louisiana infantry; seven Captains and eighteen Lieutenants. Gen. George W. Morgan, with his entire force in good health, and with all his artillery and trains, arrived at Greensburg, Ky., on the Ohio river, fifteen miles from Portsmouth, on Friday evening. An affray occurred in New York Sunday morning between a number of white men and negroes, which resulted in the killing of one white man and the seriously wounding of another. Before the police arrive
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