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time, brought so many delays and reverses on our guns. It will be readily perceived that to permit the Governors of States to assign troops to special officers, would be virtually conceding to them the right to make or unmake General son command. A band of thirty or forty marauders, stragglers and deserters from, and camp followers of, our army, are roaming over portions of London and Fairfax counties, insulting, maltreating, and plundering citizens with impurity. We trust that Gen. Banks will promptly send after them a body of cavalry with instructions to shoot or hang them on the spot where caught. Just prior to the visit paid to Warrenton by our forces, the Confederate authorities in anticipation of the away every negro in the neighborhood, slave or free, to a portion of The Northern Episcopal Convention. The opening discourse of this body, which is still in session at New York, was delivered by Bishop McCloskey, of Michigan. He began by observing t
ernment authority. They seemed to have an idea that the white warriors were all upon the war path against the rebels. Private advises from General McClellan's headquarters assure us that the President's emancipation proclamation is heartily approved by the Union men in Maryland and Virginia, whose only regret expressed is that it does not sooner take effect. In saloons even and in private circles a here drinking is done — the common toast is "Lincoln's proclamation, little McClellan, Burnside, and the Union army." The enthusiasm for these officials is described as very great in this vicinity. Another evidence of the sturdy treason of Lower Maryland is found in the fact that a large exodus of male population there is taking place into Virginia. The lower counties of the State will not be able to furnish more than a fourth part of their quota under the draft. It every male individual of Charles and St. Mary's counties were to be impressed, still the quotas of these two coun
gion pure and holy and its had not been filled with panderers to public favor. She must continue what she had been, the great conservative element in the nation. The communion service was conducted by Bishops Remper, of Wisconsin, De Laucey, of Western New York; Whittington of Maryland; Bishopric king of Vermont, and others. The large congregation participated in the communion. The right reverend clergy then returned to the House of Bishops, where they organized by electing the Rev. Dr. Creek, of Kentucky, president, and the Rev. Dr. Kendall, of Boston secretary. The Convention held its fourth daily session on Saturday. The attendance was large, and a question of the forms of the Rubric, and of special prayer in reference to the present national emergency led to protracted and animated debates.--The feature of the session was the address of Hon. Horatin Seymour candidate for the Governorship of New York, who while favoring a special form of prayer, adjured the Conventi
James Price (search for this): article 1
papers of Monday last October "> They contain brief dispatches a great Federal victory at Corinth. A Washington states that the Confederates the instant under Price and attached at but with great slaughter, and retreated, dead and wounded on the fled. The dispatch "our forces are in full pursuit." A dispatch the 5th, says: On Saturday morning General Price, attacked General right, while Generals with great determination. At was penetrated and the Corinth House, near the centre They at the point of the bayonet.--General his column over an abatts on the yards of They at the time to a scathing and driven back by a soners. undoubtedly be completely destroyed The New York Herald, on these dispatch and repeats its the Southern States to return to the under Price and Van Dorn had been force in that vicinity, made up Corinth army. brought away from New Orleans and the new After their defeat at the rebels rapidly as pos
nd people not including the wounded.--The Railroad is not The telegraph line has been repaired to General reached on Saturday to the with a large force General early this morning to to-day General of the Batchie river and The retreating. Their is very a large. General a message here from Column a large of wounded. was killed the United States of the sent at 3 P. M., on the following intelligence had bee there. of 40,000 men, attacked Gen. our troops, who manner. was killed at the head of his captured a large number of guns and prisoners. undoubtedly be completely destroyed The New York Herald, on these dispatch and repeats its the Southern States to return to the under Price and Van Dorn had been force in that vicinity, made up Corinth army. brought away from New Orleans and the new After their defeat at the rebels rapidly as possible all the forces they that neighborhood for
George S. Foote (search for this): article 1
n peace propositions and the Northern peace party. The New York Times has the following article as a leader: It is at least a curious circumstance that Mr. Foote, of Tennessee should have brought forward his propositions of peace in the rebel Congress at the precise moment when I has become important for the success of thhe party the justice to believe that they are laboring not for the independence of the South, but for the of the North. They the Confederacy, but merely to Mr. Foote, on the contrary, is earnestly bent upon achieving a complete separation of the two sections; and we interpret the conjunction of his remarkable speech at Richmolute enough to avail themselves at once. The foolish story set afloat by somebody in the office of the Philadelphia Inquirer who had taken the pains to lead Mr. Foote's speech, of the tenor of the Southern peace propositions, would not deserve a moment's attention, were it not to be feared that in some parts of the country it
Charles J. Faulkner (search for this): article 1
alse. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was at one time an apprehension that the Northwestern Indiana
John Morgan (search for this): article 1
nt one just at this Following up the triumphs at South and the success movements of Buell and Morgan in Kentucky it will have a greatly of Bragg's and South's army in Kentucky forces in Arkansa West--reported defeat of --the battle in &C. A dispatch Portsmouth, Ohio, says that Gen. John Morgan, with 1,000 Confederates, was defeated by the county Home Guard, at Olive Hill, Ky., . It says: After several skirmishing Morgan was several of his men killed. Morgan then retreated toward the river, burning thirty on his way. Last night Morgan Meanwhile Col. went and broughMorgan then retreated toward the river, burning thirty on his way. Last night Morgan Meanwhile Col. went and brought up 300 of the 117th A dispatch Louisville says the Confederate, had evacuated Baldstown, Ky., on the evening of the 4th instant, and it was shortly after by the Federal of corps. The disMorgan Meanwhile Col. went and brought up 300 of the 117th A dispatch Louisville says the Confederate, had evacuated Baldstown, Ky., on the evening of the 4th instant, and it was shortly after by the Federal of corps. The dispatch, which is dated the 5th, says: A has been prevalent here that General was attached by Kirby Smith a rebel force, at to-day, and driven This last is entirely dis Danville for Lex
W. J. Florence (search for this): article 1
received here shows that that is the estimate put upon him by the good people of Frederick, and indeed the whole of Maryland. Affairs in Washington. The Washington dispatches of the 5th, in the New York papers, contain some matters of interest Col. H. F. Saunders, of the 19th Wisconsin, has been dismissed from the service. About 2,000 soldiers of Pope's army are still straggling about Washington. Pope is to return to that city shortly to testify in the Bull Run defeat case. W. J. Florence, the actor, had been badly injured by being thrown from his horse. We give the following from the dispatches: The Washington correspondent of a Western journal states that Gen. McClernand denies having endorsed the President's emancipation proclamation, and pronounces the statements published in the papers as unqualifiedly false. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regime
dless of what Europe said [Applause.] Our first duty in sustaining the Government was to sustain its friends in the State canvass — the nominees of the Syracuse Convention on the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting adjourned. The difficulty with Gen. Sigel. The Washington Star announces officially that Gen. Sigel but requested to be relieved from his command. This man is, next to the leader of the German in the United States. with the failure to assign to his corps certain regiments recently raised which the Governors of the States in which they were raised promised to pend to him. No such agreement or arrangement between those functionaries and Gen. Sigel could be binding on the Department, which must necessarily assign troops as they come into the service just where the exigencies of the moment require them most imperatively. We are persuaded that a little reflection will open th
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