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Maggie Carpenter (search for this): article 2
ofa, having exhausted the paper. "Visiting" replied his reverence. "I must go up to old Mrs. Balcomb's and see the Joneses, and try to prevail on Phil Taggart to let his children come to Sunday school once more. Then I have to see poor Maggie Carpenter, who is much worse again; and if I have time I shall get into the omnibus and ride out to the mills to see that girl Miss Flower mentioned to me yesterday. "What a round!" exclaimed Chrissy. "You will never get home to dinner at two o'moment. She picked up and replaced the scattered apparel, folded the snowy cravats, warmed her husband's overshoes, and saw that the beautiful little communion service, presented by a lady of the parish, and consecrated to such sufferers as Maggie Carpenter, was in readiness. Before he left the house, Mr. Ashton had forgotten both his fretfulness and its cause. He kissed his wife, and thanked her for her trouble, and proposed that she should send for Lilly to spend the day with her, and strod
Her features were not very regular, and she was not very ill, but her eyes were so bright and color and her figure so elastic and her abundant hair, and above all, her they manners, and the expression of sunny good temper and perfect openness lighting up her face, made most people consider her a very attractive woman. Forever one in the parish liked her, from the two old people, who eat near the above in church and always came round to get their dinner at the parsonage on Sunday, to Mrs. Dr. Rush, who was by far the grandest lady in the parish. Mr. and Mrs. Ashton had been married about six months, after an engagement of almost three years, during which time they had corresponded vigorously, but had seen very little of each other, for Mr. Ashton was an assistant in an overgrown parish in one of our larger cities, and could seldom be spared; and Chrissy was a teacher in another great city, where she supported herself and helped by her labors to educate one of her brothers for th
Blokets Clement (search for this): article 2
ed. You most content yourself to board a while longer with good friend, Mrs. Blokets Clement. And to the resolution she stead lastly ochered, despite Clement's Clement's persuasions and those of George who was much distressed at the thought that his sister's marriage should be put off on his account. Under these circumstances the loalf pathetic, which rung in Chrissy's ear's and made her heart ache long after Clement had forgotten the circumstance altogether. Strange as it may seem, Mr. Ashton shall in time lose the power of respecting my husband; and when respect goes, Clement, love does not last long. This very morning I found myself wishing I had neveown you." Chrissy burst into tears, an unusual demonstration for her, and Clement, springing up once more, traversed the room once or twice, and then sat down bcame to be buttonless. "No, don't say one word about them, my love," said Clement, impatiently. "I will never complain again, if the sleeves are missing as wel
She had suffered much on discovering that such was the cause, and felt inclined sometimes to wish never been disenchanted; but she was a very also woman; she knew her husband's excellences, and his strength as well as weakness and altering an old maxim to her purpose, she resolved both to endure and to cure. "What do you set about to day" said she, as Mr. Ashton arose from the corner of the sofa, having exhausted the paper. "Visiting" replied his reverence. "I must go up to old Mrs. Balcomb's and see the Joneses, and try to prevail on Phil Taggart to let his children come to Sunday school once more. Then I have to see poor Maggie Carpenter, who is much worse again; and if I have time I shall get into the omnibus and ride out to the mills to see that girl Miss Flower mentioned to me yesterday. "What a round!" exclaimed Chrissy. "You will never get home to dinner at two o'clock. I think I will put it off till six, and run the of being thought stuck up, like poor cousin
Phil Taggart (search for this): article 2
use, and felt inclined sometimes to wish never been disenchanted; but she was a very also woman; she knew her husband's excellences, and his strength as well as weakness and altering an old maxim to her purpose, she resolved both to endure and to cure. "What do you set about to day" said she, as Mr. Ashton arose from the corner of the sofa, having exhausted the paper. "Visiting" replied his reverence. "I must go up to old Mrs. Balcomb's and see the Joneses, and try to prevail on Phil Taggart to let his children come to Sunday school once more. Then I have to see poor Maggie Carpenter, who is much worse again; and if I have time I shall get into the omnibus and ride out to the mills to see that girl Miss Flower mentioned to me yesterday. "What a round!" exclaimed Chrissy. "You will never get home to dinner at two o'clock. I think I will put it off till six, and run the of being thought stuck up, like poor cousin Lilly?" "What do you mean?" "Why, you know they
was cleared away, the chairs set back, and Mrs. Ashton in a neat morning dress, with a pretty litt the subject, was entirely his affair. Mrs. Ashton, as she was styled by the parish — Christiaas by far the grandest lady in the parish. Mr. and Mrs. Ashton had been married about six montt so stuck up!" "Poor Lilly!" exclaimed Mr. Ashton, laughing. "What did she say? " "O, sh door after him with unnecessary force, and Mrs. Ashton returned to the fire and arranged her work ace. She was not left long undisturbed, for Mr. Ashton's voice was soon heard calling her in impatiich might have been justified. perhaps, if Mrs. Ashton had picked his pocket of his sermon as he wwas in readiness. Before he left the house, Mr. Ashton had forgotten both his fretfulness and its chimself could have produced the change. Mr. Ashton, exhausted with his day's work, toward home, Missus arose and went into the kitchen, and Mr. Ashton, taking a candle from the table, entered the[10 more...]
sing as well as the buttons. " "But I must tell you, because I really mean to have my housekeeping affairs in as good order as any one. I was looking over your shirts yesterday afternoon, and had put them all to rights but these two, when Mrs. Lenox came in, in great distress, to say that her sister's child was much worse, and, they feared, dying; so I dropped all and went over there. You know how it was. No one had any calmness or presence of mind; the child's convulsions were frightful to witness; the mother was in hysterics, and Mrs. Lenox worse than nobody at all. It was nearly midnight before I could get away, and in the mean time Amy had put the room in order and restored the shirts to their places." Here Amy put her head into the room. "If you please, Missus, a young woman in the kitchen would like to see Missus a minute." Missus arose and went into the kitchen, and Mr. Ashton, taking a candle from the table, entered the study and locked himself in.--Chrissy wa
Lilly?" "What do you mean?" "Why, you know they always dine at six to suit the Doctor's arrangements. One day Lilly called about some society matter on a lady who lives not a hundred miles from her street, about five o'clock in the afternoon.--The lady herself came to the door, and Lilly was about entering, when she thought she perceived the smell of roast meat in the hall; and said very politely, but perhaps it is now your dinner hour?" "No, indeed! replied madam, with indignation. We don't dine at this time of day; we are not so stuck up!" "Poor Lilly!" exclaimed Mr. Ashton, laughing. "What did she say? " "O, she did her errand and retired, of course. There was nothing to be said." Mr. Ashton turned is fretfulness and its cause. He kissed his wife, and thanked her for her trouble, and proposed that she should send for Lilly to spend the day with her, and strode away with his usual elasticity of step. Chrissy watched him from the door till