hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
McClellan 21 3 Browse Search
United States (United States) 12 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 10 0 Browse Search
Loudoun (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
John Brown 8 0 Browse Search
Abe Lincoln 8 0 Browse Search
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
John Darracott 7 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 8, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 32 total hits in 13 results.

1 2
Natchez (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 2
visiting a lady of his acquaintance at Rouen. They were engaged in earnest conversation on the subject of the future prospects of the lady's children, the youngest of whom — a girl of eighteen--sat working beside them. Suddenly the latter started from her seat with a loud shriek, and threw herself into her mother's arms. On being questioned as to the cause of her agitation, she pointed to a sofa, and, weeping bitterly, declared she had seen descend upon it the figure of her elder sister, Rosalie, then on a visit to some relations at or near Havre. The countenance of the phantom was pale and death-stricken.--This occurred at 4 o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th September. Two days after, tidings arrived that Rosalie L — had been unhappily drowned in a boating excursion at Havre, at (it was affirmed) the precise moment of the appearance. As another instance, here is a circumstance minutely related by Monsieur M--, a retired French officer, in a letter to a friend: "Left
Rouen (France) (search for this): article 2
ood and innocent, And love the living. They are cheerful creatures-- And quiet as the sunbeams — and most like, In grace, and patient love, and spotless beauty, The new-born of mankind. To proceed at once to illustration, here are two instances of "intuition," both brief and true. The first is supplied by a gentleman well known in French literary circles, whom it induced to bestow much attention on that and kindred subjects. In 1845 he was visiting a lady of his acquaintance at Rouen. They were engaged in earnest conversation on the subject of the future prospects of the lady's children, the youngest of whom — a girl of eighteen--sat working beside them. Suddenly the latter started from her seat with a loud shriek, and threw herself into her mother's arms. On being questioned as to the cause of her agitation, she pointed to a sofa, and, weeping bitterly, declared she had seen descend upon it the figure of her elder sister, Rosalie, then on a visit to some relations at
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
ed in prayer as he was desired, he felt as though at once environed by all the powers of evil. Nevertheless, with reeling brain and bursting heart, and all but overcome, he steeled himself to the very utmost, and struggling on through unutterable mental torture, at length regained his calm. But never more, for him, such fearful championship! A broad distinction, of course, lies between cases of mere cerebral excitement and such as we have before adduced. Hallucinations are as fully recognized, if not quite so common, as colds in the head. Few of those who must have noticed the twitch or toss of the head peculiar to the late eminent counsel, Mr. B--, were aware that it was engendered by a perpetual vision of a raven perched on his left shoulder. A gentleman now residing in Broadway, New York, transacts business daily under the immediate supervision of his great-uncle, who, in a laced coat and ruffles, occupies a large arm-chair placed expressly to receive the honored vision.
Harfleur (France) (search for this): article 2
ber. Two days after, tidings arrived that Rosalie L — had been unhappily drowned in a boating excursion at Havre, at (it was affirmed) the precise moment of the appearance. As another instance, here is a circumstance minutely related by Monsieur M--, a retired French officer, in a letter to a friend: "Left an orphan at an early age, I was brought up under the care of a kind-hearted god-mother, who could scarcely have cherished me more had I been her own offspring. She resided at Harfleur, and, being in easy circumstances, refused me nothing that could contribute to my youthful pleasure, keeping my pockets withal comfortably lined with that material which rendered my frequent visits to the Sunday fetes in the neighborhood doubly agreeable. On one occasion I had started, as usual, in company with a band of young vagabonds like myself, to attend a fete at Quillebouf, on the opposite side of the Seine. "Contrary to my natural habit, I felt uneasy and depressed. An inexpl
Havre (France) (search for this): article 2
to her mother's arms. On being questioned as to the cause of her agitation, she pointed to a sofa, and, weeping bitterly, declared she had seen descend upon it the figure of her elder sister, Rosalie, then on a visit to some relations at or near Havre. The countenance of the phantom was pale and death-stricken.--This occurred at 4 o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th September. Two days after, tidings arrived that Rosalie L — had been unhappily drowned in a boating excursion at Havre, at (it Havre, at (it was affirmed) the precise moment of the appearance. As another instance, here is a circumstance minutely related by Monsieur M--, a retired French officer, in a letter to a friend: "Left an orphan at an early age, I was brought up under the care of a kind-hearted god-mother, who could scarcely have cherished me more had I been her own offspring. She resided at Harfleur, and, being in easy circumstances, refused me nothing that could contribute to my youthful pleasure, keeping my poc
Brighton (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
(but it is only report) dead." "He is dead," said Mrs. D--, quietly. "He died this morning." "You have a telegram?" "You shall hear." And Mrs. D — told her story to the wondering friends. As quickly as news could reach Brighton she received intimation of Mr. D--'s death at the hour of his appearance. A singular and suggestive statement is, that the scene witnessed by Mrs. D — at Brighton was being enacted in the death-chamber of Mr. W. D--, hundreds of miles distaBrighton was being enacted in the death-chamber of Mr. W. D--, hundreds of miles distant. His mind wandered somewhat as the end drew near, but perpetually returned to the subject of the unhappy lawsuit. Mistaking his sister for Mrs. D--, he addressed to her the most fervent entreaties for pardon, avowing his bitter regret, condemning his own injustice and covetousness, and declaring that he could not die in peace without her forgiveness. Three times the dying man raised his hands in the manner she had witnessed, and so expired. One morning, some years since, the lady of a
ly the latter started from her seat with a loud shriek, and threw herself into her mother's arms. On being questioned as to the cause of her agitation, she pointed to a sofa, and, weeping bitterly, declared she had seen descend upon it the figure of her elder sister, Rosalie, then on a visit to some relations at or near Havre. The countenance of the phantom was pale and death-stricken.--This occurred at 4 o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th September. Two days after, tidings arrived that Rosalie L — had been unhappily drowned in a boating excursion at Havre, at (it was affirmed) the precise moment of the appearance. As another instance, here is a circumstance minutely related by Monsieur M--, a retired French officer, in a letter to a friend: "Left an orphan at an early age, I was brought up under the care of a kind-hearted god-mother, who could scarcely have cherished me more had I been her own offspring. She resided at Harfleur, and, being in easy circumstances, refus
German Luther (search for this): article 2
might wrestle for her in prayer, and emancipate the afflicted spirit, if it might be, from its present intolerable condition. This condition she described as one of an eager longing to repent, but of perpetual contention with some terrible hindrance, only removable through the means suggested. Much troubled in mind, Madam L--, after some deliberation, resolved to appeal to the strongest and most ardent soul within the range of her acquaintance, in the person of--, sometimes called the "German Luther." To him, accordingly, she made her appeal. The good man consented, and redeemed his promise with characteristic zeal. Soon after, the apparition revisited Madame L--. This time with aspect more composed, but still marked with traces of suffering and anxiety, and, warmly thanking her friend for what had been already done, adjured her, in the most touching language, (repeated by the narrator with wonderful power and pathos,) to prevail upon the zealous intercessor to engage once mor
ed, but still marked with traces of suffering and anxiety, and, warmly thanking her friend for what had been already done, adjured her, in the most touching language, (repeated by the narrator with wonderful power and pathos,) to prevail upon the zealous intercessor to engage once more — but once again — in prayer, on her behalf. Madame L--, deeply moved, did as she was requested, and wrote at once to--, who happened at this time to be absent at the distance of two days journey. On the third night the spirit once more stood by her friend's side, with an aspect of complete tranquility, and surrounded with angelic radiance, declaring that all was now well. Two days more, and — bursts into Madame L--'s presence, pale, and greatly agitated. "Woman, woman!" he exclaimed, "what have you done? For no reward that could be proposed to me would I endure such another hour of conflict and agony as that which my compliance with your request has caused me." He then proceeded to rel<
dy: Tremble not, Fear not me: The dead are ever good and innocent, And love the living. They are cheerful creatures-- And quiet as the sunbeams — and most like, In grace, and patient love, and spotless beauty, The new-born of mankind. To proceed at once to illustration, here are two instances of "intuition," both brief and true. The first is supplied by a gentleman well known in French literary circles, whom it induced to bestow much attention on that and kindred subjects. In 1845 he was visiting a lady of his acquaintance at Rouen. They were engaged in earnest conversation on the subject of the future prospects of the lady's children, the youngest of whom — a girl of eighteen--sat working beside them. Suddenly the latter started from her seat with a loud shriek, and threw herself into her mother's arms. On being questioned as to the cause of her agitation, she pointed to a sofa, and, weeping bitterly, declared she had seen descend upon it the figure of her elder si
1 2