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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 565 total hits in 251 results.

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May, 1 AD (search for this): article 6
would be to send a fast side-wheel mercantile steamer from New York with the reinforcement. Accordingly the "Star of the West" was selected for the duty. The substitution of this mercantile steamer for the Brooklyn, which would have been able to defend herself in case of attack, was reluctantly yielded by me to the high military judgment of Gen. Scott. The change of programme required a brief space of time, but the Star of the West left New York for Charleston on the evening of the 5th of Jan. On the very day however, when this ill-fated steamer left New York, a telegram was dispatched by General Scott to Colonel Scott to countermand her departure; but it did not reach its destination until after she had gone to sea. The reason for this countermand shall be stated in the language of Secretary Holt, to be found in a letter addressed by him to Mr. Thompson, the late Secretary of the interior, on the 5th of March, 1861, and published in the National Intelligence. Mr. Holt says:
September, 1 AD (search for this): article 6
nd to New York. A military necessity for a capitulation may have existed in case there should be an attack upon the fort, or a demand for its sur- render, but surely none such could have existed for its voluntary surrender and abandonment. Probably that to which the General meant to refer was not the quart, but the actual, truce of arms concluded at Charleston on the 11th of January, 1861, between Gov. Pickens and Major Anderson, without the knowledge of the President. It was on the 9th of January that the Star of the West under the American flag, was fired upon in the harbor of Charleston by order of Gov. Pickens. Immediately after this outrage Major Anderson sent a flag to the Governor stating that he presumed the act had been unauthorized, and for that reason he had not opened fire from Fort Sumter on the adjacent batteries, but demanding its disavowal, and if this were not sent in a reasonable time he would consider it war, and fire on any vessel that attempted to leave t
November, 1 AD (search for this): article 6
g, was fired upon in the harbor of Charleston by order of Gov. Pickens. Immediately after this outrage Major Anderson sent a flag to the Governor stating that he presumed the act had been unauthorized, and for that reason he had not opened fire from Fort Sumter on the adjacent batteries, but demanding its disavowal, and if this were not sent in a reasonable time he would consider it war, and fire on any vessel that attempted to leave the harbor. Two days after this occurrence, on the 11th of January, Governor Pickens had the audacity to demand of Major Anderson the surrender of the fort. In his answer of the same date the Major made the following proposition: "Should your Excellency deem fit, previous to a resort to arms, to refer this matter to Washington, it would afford me the sincerest pleasure to depute one of my officers to accompany any messenger you may deem proper to be the bearer of your demand." This proposition was promptly accepted by the Governor, and, in p
January, 10 AD (search for this): article 5
eneral Superintendent, for the fiscal year ending September 30th: The gross receipts of the company for the period indicated were larger than they ever were before, viz: $1.016,157.77; the expense of administration amounting to $371,809.96, left a balance of nett revenues of $644,347.81. A large proportion of this sum has been expended in paying dividends and other indebtedness of the company. Cost of road, including last ten miles from Jackson's river depot to Covington, and equipment to Oct. 1st, is $5.918,882.84. Total cost of completing road to Covington, $10,000 additional. Distance from Richmond to Eastern terminus of the Covington and Ohio Railroad, 205 miles; the Blue Ridge Railroad, owned by the State, 17 miles long, being included therein. Length of road owned by the company 188 miles; cost of same per mile, $30,535.61. Total liabilities of company, $1,357,198.30. In reference to the capacity of railroads to continue operations during the present war, it is stated th
35 Negroes for Sale at public auction. --In pursuance of a decree of the Circuit Court of the county of Henrico, in the suit of Darracott a guardian against Darracott and others, the undersigned will offer for sale at public auction; to the highest bidder, for cash in currant the late residence of Mr. John Darracott, deed about one mile from the city of Richmond, on the Brook. Turnpike on the 14th day of the present month. (November,) at 11 o'clock, thirty-five Negroes belonging to Mr. Darracott's estate. Many of them slaves are young and very likely. Some of them are house servants and five of them good workers and three many are, I am interested, good cooks, and being sold for no fault, persons desiring of procuring servants for their own use will have a opportunity of doing so. no 4 Benj. Pollard Com'r. Sale conducted by Goddin & Apperson, Aucts.
July, 11 AD (search for this): article 3
Railroad accident. Augusta, Nov. 7. --A collision occurred on the Columbia branch of the South Carolina Railroad yesterday, near Orangeburg. Lieut. Maroney, of the Palmetto Guards, was killed. Col. P. Phillips and family arrived at Mobile on the 4th, from New Orleans. [Mrs. Phillips is the lady who was imprisoned by Butler, for laughing while the funeral of De Kay, a Federal officer, was passing her house. She suffered much before her release from Ship Island.]
July, 11 AD (search for this): article 4
From Northern Mississippi. Holly Springs, Nov. 7. --The excitement consequent upon the reported advance of the Abolitionists has subsided. They did not come this side of Lamar.
August, 11 AD (search for this): article 15
Proceedings in the Courts. Mayor's Court, Saturday, Nov. 8th. --Elizabeth Palmeter was committed in default of surety on the charge of assaulting and abusing John D. Kawk. George Drew, mulatto, was brought up for examination for stealing $60 from Wm. H. Major. No evidence was offered against the accused, who has been in prison for several months past. The case was continued until the 17th inst. William M. Miller, for a violent assault on Macduff Liggon, was held to bail inf grown lad, said he was born in Jackson, Miss., and raised in Louisiana. Martin O'Brien, Pat Doyle, and Edward Hall, arrested as vagrants, having no visible means of support gave bail, and were released from jail. Hustings Court, Saturday, Nov. 8.--A special session of the Alderman's Court of Hustings con- vened to day for the examination of several cases of felony sent up from the Mayor. There were present Recorder Caskie, and Aldermen Bray, Anderson, Timberlake Lipscomb and Clopt
August, 11 AD (search for this): article 2
Messages of the Governor of Georgia. Milledgeville, Nov. 8. --Gov. Brown's annual Message was read to the Legislature for Thursday. He refers principally to topics of State interest. In a special Message he takes ground against the Conscript law, and submits the subject to the Legislature for action. He also recommends action on the subjects of martial law, habeas corpus, and impressment of private property.
September, 11 AD (search for this): article 1
The Yankee raid into Fredericksburg. Fredericksburg, Nov. 9. --Seventy-five Yankees came here to-day. They said that Stuart made a daring raid into Maryland Thursday, capturing 150 prisoners; that the Democrats have swept the North; that England and France have recognized the Confederacy, and that Lord Lyons is so instructed. The raid was most bold and daring.
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