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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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March, 12 AD (search for this): article 6
ived in Washington on the 12th, and, accompanied by the Secretary of War, held a conversation with the President on the 15th of December. Whilst I have no recollection whatever of this conversation, he, doubtlessly states correctly that I did refuse to send 300 men to reinforce Major Anderson at Fort Moultrie, who had not then removed to Fort Sumter. The reason for this refusal is manifest to all who recollect the history of the time. But twelve days before, in the annual message of the 3d of December, I had urged upon Congress the adoption of amendments to the Constitution of the same character with those subsequently proposed by Mr. Crittenden, called the "Crittenden compromise."--At that time high hopes were entertained throughout the country that these would be adopted. Besides, I believed, and this correctly, as the event proved, that Major Anderson was then in no danger of attack. Indeed, he and his command were then treated with marked kindness by the authorities and people
Southern cotton and tobacco, the great staples of the world, all passed through their hands on their way to a foreign market. The very negroes, for whose sake they were constantly threatening the South, were a source of far more profit to them than they have ever been to their masters. The cotton and tobacco of the South were, indeed, the grand levers that set all Northern trade in motion. Without them New York would never have risen much above the figure that represented her population in 1810, and New England would have been, where she ought to be now, at the tall of the Union. The Democrats could see all this, but the Republicans could not, and they persisted until they destroyed the Union. The Democrats now wish to restore that Union, because while it existed it was a source of unalloyed prosperity. They see plainly enough that if the North be compelled to pay the same duties with England, England will supplant the manufactures of the North. They see that if direct trade
t present I shall specify only one. I could not have stated that on a future contingent occasion I would telegraph "Major Anderson, of Fort Moultrie, to hold the forts (Moultrie and Sumter) against attack;" because, with prudent precaution, this had already been done several days before, through a special messenger sent to Major Anderson for this very purpose. I refer to Major Buel, of the army. The General's supplementary note of the same day, presenting to me Gen Jackson's conduct in 1838 during the period of nullification, as an example, requires no special notice. Even if the cases were not entirely different, I had previously determined upon a policy of my own, as will appear from my annual message. This was, at every hazard, to collect the customs at Charleston, and outside of the port, if need be, in a vessel of war. Mr. Coloock, the existing collector, as I had anticipated, resigned his office about the end of December, and immediately thereafter I nominated to the Sen
November, 1857 AD (search for this): article 6
tion of a few hundred men, were out of reach, on our remote frontiers, where it had been continuously stationed for years, to protect the inhabitants and the emigrants on their way thither against the attacks of hostile Indians All were insufficient, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdr
November, 1858 AD (search for this): article 6
t, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdraw troops from one frontier in order to reinforce another, the weakened points have been instantly attacked or threatened with formidable invasion." These "views" of Gen. Scott exhibit the crude notions then prevailing even among intelligent a
January 2nd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
The South Carolina Commissioners were appointed on the 22d, and arrived in Washington on the 27th December. The day after their arrival it was announced that Major Anderson had removed from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter. This rendered them furious. On the same day they addressed an angry letter to the President demanding the surrender of Fort Sumter. The President answered this letter on the 30th December by a peremptory refusal. This brought forth a reply from the Commissioners on the 2d January, 1861, of such an insulting character that the President instantly returned it to them with the following endorsement: "This paper, just presented to the President, is of such a character that he declines to receive it." From that time forward all friendly political and personal intercourse finally ceased between the revolutionary Senators and the President, and he was severely attacked by them in the Senate, and especially by Mr. Jefferson Davis. Indeed, their intercourse had previously
January 5th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
rior, on the 5th of March, 1861, and published in the National Intelligence. Mr. Holt says: "The countermand spoken of (by Mr. Thompson) was not more cordially sanctioned by the President than it was by General Scott and myself; not because of any dissent from the order on the part of the President, but because of a letter received that day from Maj Anderson, stating, in effect, that he regarded himself secure in his position; and yet more from intelligence which late on Saturday evening, (5th January, 1861,) reached the Department that a heavy battery had been erected among the sand hills, at the entrance to Charleston harbor, which would probably destroy any unarmed vessel (and such was the Star of the West,) which might attempt to make its way to Fort Sumter. This important information satisfied the Government that there was no present necessity for sending reinforcements, and that when sent they should go, not in a vessel of commerce, but of war. Hence the countermand was d
January 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
evented into an interference with the Government in a vigorous prosecution of the war for the maintenance of the Constitution and the restoration of the Union, which was far very far, from my intention. After a careful retrospect, I can solemnly declare, before God and my country, that I cannot reproach myself with any act of commission or omission since the existing troubles commenced. I have never doubted that my countrymen would yet do me justice. In my special message of the 8th of January, 1861, I presented a full and fair exposition of the alarming condition of the country, and urged Congress either to adopt measures of compromise, or, failing in this, to prepare for the last alternative. In both aspects my recommendation was disregarded. I shall close this document with a quotation of the last sentences of that message, as follows: "In conclusion, it will be permitted me to remark that I have often warned my countrymen of the dangers which now surround us. This m
January 11th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
nstructed to evacuate the fort as soon as suitable transportations could be procured to carry himself and his command to New York. A military necessity for a capitulation may have existed in case there should be an attack upon the fort, or a demand for its sur- render, but surely none such could have existed for its voluntary surrender and abandonment. Probably that to which the General meant to refer was not the quart, but the actual, truce of arms concluded at Charleston on the 11th of January, 1861, between Gov. Pickens and Major Anderson, without the knowledge of the President. It was on the 9th of January that the Star of the West under the American flag, was fired upon in the harbor of Charleston by order of Gov. Pickens. Immediately after this outrage Major Anderson sent a flag to the Governor stating that he presumed the act had been unauthorized, and for that reason he had not opened fire from Fort Sumter on the adjacent batteries, but demanding its disavowal, and if
January 18th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
I trust I have said enough, and more than enough, to convince every mind why I did not, with a force of five companies, attempt to reinforce Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi, Fort Morgan, below Mobile; Forts Pickens and McRae, in Pensacola harbor; Fort Pulaski. below Savannah; Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Charleston harbor, and Fort Monroe, in Virginia. These "views," both original and supplementary, were published by Gen. Scott in the National Intelligencer, of January 18th, 1861, at the most important and critical period of the Administration.--Their publication at that time could do no possible good, and might do much harm. To have published them without the President's knowledge and consent, was as much in violation of the sacred confidence which ought to prevail between the Commanding General of the army and the Commander- in-Chief, as it would have been for the Secretary of War to publish the same documents without his authority. What is of more importan
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