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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): article 6
omac, South, (the very case which has occurred,) was not within the scope of General S.'s "provisional remedies;" that is to say, to establish by force, if necessary, the continuity of our territory. In his "views" he also states as follows: "But break this glorious Union by whatever line or lines that political madness may contrive, and there would be no hope of recruiting the fragments except by the laceration and despotism of the sword. To effect such result the intestine wars of our Mexican neighbors would, in comparison with ours, sink into mere child's play." In the General's opinion, "a smaller evil (than these intestine wars) would be to allow the fragments of the great Republic to form themselves into new Confederacies, probably four. " He then points out what ought to be the boundaries between the new Unions; and at the end of each, goes so far as even to indicate the cities which ought to be the capitals of the three first on this side of the Rocky Mountains t
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 6
rs, to protect the inhabitants and the emigrants on their way thither against the attacks of hostile Indians All were insufficient, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdraw troops from one frontier in order to reinforce another, the weakened points have been instantly attacked or threatene
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): article 6
the emigrants on their way thither against the attacks of hostile Indians All were insufficient, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdraw troops from one frontier in order to reinforce another, the weakened points have been instantly attacked or threatened with formidable invasion."
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 6
and even expresses the extraordinary opinion that, with the possession of these forts, "the rebels might have purchased an early recognition." I shall next advert to the statement that the expedition under Captain Ward, "of three or four small steamers belonging to the coast survey," was kept back by something like a truce or armistice, [made here,] embracing Charleston and Pensacola harbors, agreed upon between the President and certain principal seceders of South Carolina, Florida, Louisiana, &c. And this truce lasted to the end of the Administration." Things altogether distinct in their nature are often so blended in this statement that it is difficult to separate them. Such is eminently the case in connecting the facts relative to Charleston with Pensacola. Having already treated of the charge of having kept back reinforcements from Pensacola, I shall now say something of the charge of having also kept them back from Charleston. Neither a truce, nor a quasi truce, nor
Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): article 6
eir way thither against the attacks of hostile Indians All were insufficient, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdraw troops from one frontier in order to reinforce another, the weakened points have been instantly attacked or threatened with formidable invasion." These "views" of Ge
Nebraska (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): article 6
rants on their way thither against the attacks of hostile Indians All were insufficient, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdraw troops from one frontier in order to reinforce another, the weakened points have been instantly attacked or threatened with formidable invasion." These "vi
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): article 6
tect the inhabitants and the emigrants on their way thither against the attacks of hostile Indians All were insufficient, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdraw troops from one frontier in order to reinforce another, the weakened points have been instantly attacked or threatened with for
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
ally necessary to disentangle the statement of Gen. Scott. The South Carolina Commissioners were appointed on the 22d, and arrived in Washingy the General, in his statement, should have asserted that "the South Carolina commissioners had already been many days in Washington, and no force Fort Sumter, because he was holding negotiations with the South Carolina Commissioners. And still again, that "afterwards Secretary Holember, I suggested to him that, although I had not received the South Carolina Commissioners in their official capacity, but merely as privateed upon between the President and certain principal seceders of South Carolina, Florida, Louisiana, &c. And this truce lasted to the end of thny human authority concerning Charleston. On the contrary, the South Carolina Commissioners, first and last, and all the time, were informed he sent on his part, Hon. J. W. Hayne, the Attorney General of South Carolina, to Washington, whilst Major Anderson deputed Lieut. Hall, of t
Utah (Utah, United States) (search for this): article 6
s of hostile Indians All were insufficient, and both Gen. Scott and myself had endeavored in vain to prevail upon Congress to raise several additional regiments for this purpose. In recommending this augmentation of the army, the General states in his report to the War Department of November, 1857, that "it would not more than furnish the reinforcements now greatly needed in Florida, Texas, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, (T) Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, leaving not a company for Utah." And again, in his report of November, 1858, he says: "This want of troops to give reasonable security to our citizens in distant settlements, including emigrants on the plains, can scarcely be too strongly stated; but I will only add that as often as we have been obliged to withdraw troops from one frontier in order to reinforce another, the weakened points have been instantly attacked or threatened with formidable invasion." These "views" of Gen. Scott exhibit the crude notions
United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
pter in the Mystery of the War — Reply of James Buchanan to the Statements of Gen. Scott. James Buchanan, the "old pub. func.," who presided over the late United States, has seen General Scott's long explanation published in the National Intelligencer, and through the same paper publishes a reply. The first allegation of Scotreason to be satisfied with the arrangement, will appear from the following statement: A revolutionary outbreak had occurred in Florida; the troops of the United States had been expelled from Pensacola and the adjacent navy-yard; and Lieutenant Slemmer, of the artillery, with his brave little command, had been forced to take rstatement, should have asserted that "the South Carolina commissioners had already been many days in Washington, and no movement of defence (on the part of the United States) was permitted" These commissioners arrived in Washington on the 27th of December; Gen. Scott's request was made to the President on the 30th. It was complie
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