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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 10, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Northern Virginia--a raid of the enemy at Fredericksburg. We have very little later intelligence of operations in Northern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry, u
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Northern Virginia--a raid of the enemy at Fredericksburg. We have very little later intelligence of operations in Northern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry,
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Northern Virginia--a raid of the enemy at Fredericksburg. We have very little later intelligence of operations in Northern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence ofNorthern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry,
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
day night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry, under Lt. Col. Critcher, and two companies of the Chesapeake cavalry, of Col. Bell's command. Colonel Critcher, with his force, was quartered at the hospital building, near the railroad depot. The enemy seemed to be fully aware of his position, and at once charged his camp, capturing about twenty-five or thirty of his men. The remainder of his force
R. H. Mullen (search for this): article 1
icksburg. We have very little later intelligence of operations in Northern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry, under Lt. Col. Critcher, and two companies of the Chesap
nemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry, under Lt. Col. Critcher, and two companies of the Chesapeake cavalry, of Col. Bell's command. Colonel Critcher, with his force, was quartered at the hospital building, near the railroad depot. The enemy seemed to be fully aware of his position, and at once chargColonel Critcher, with his force, was quartered at the hospital building, near the railroad depot. The enemy seemed to be fully aware of his position, and at once charged his camp, capturing about twenty-five or thirty of his men. The remainder of his force made their escape, and afterwards formed on the outskirts of the town, where a fight ensued, the Yankees attacking them. Meantime the two companies of the Chesapeake cavalry, under Lieut. Welford Corbin, made a dash upon the guard who had Colonel C.'s men in charge, and succeeded in releasing nearly all of them, besides capturing a Yankee Captain and three privates. In these two skirmishes Mr. M. thinks w
From Northern Virginia--a raid of the enemy at Fredericksburg. We have very little later intelligence of operations in Northern Virginia. So far as we are informed, indications seem to justify the conclusion that an advance of the enemy is contemplated. It is said that the corps of the Dutch General Sigel crossed the Rappahannock river on Friday night last. Considerable skirmishing has occurred within the last two or three days in the vicinity of Warrenton. We have intelligence of a Yankee raid upon the town of Fredericksburg. Mr. R. H. Mullen, who left the town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry,
Welford Corbin (search for this): article 1
he Chesapeake cavalry, of Col. Bell's command. Colonel Critcher, with his force, was quartered at the hospital building, near the railroad depot. The enemy seemed to be fully aware of his position, and at once charged his camp, capturing about twenty-five or thirty of his men. The remainder of his force made their escape, and afterwards formed on the outskirts of the town, where a fight ensued, the Yankees attacking them. Meantime the two companies of the Chesapeake cavalry, under Lieut. Welford Corbin, made a dash upon the guard who had Colonel C.'s men in charge, and succeeded in releasing nearly all of them, besides capturing a Yankee Captain and three privates. In these two skirmishes Mr. M. thinks we had two men killed and one or two wounded. The Yankees had six or seven killed and as many wounded. The Yankees captured state that their force in the neighborhood consisted of an Ohio and an Indiana regiment of cavalry, in all numbering about 1,480 men. It will be perceive
town after our own troops had retired, and while the enemy were still in possession, has furnished as with the following account of the raid. About 9 o'clock yesterday morning the enemy's cavalry, supposed to number some three or four hundred, crossed the river at Falmouth, and dashed into the town, through Commerce, Main, and Princess Anne streets. Our forces in the town consisted of four companies of cavalry, under Lt. Col. Critcher, and two companies of the Chesapeake cavalry, of Col. Bell's command. Colonel Critcher, with his force, was quartered at the hospital building, near the railroad depot. The enemy seemed to be fully aware of his position, and at once charged his camp, capturing about twenty-five or thirty of his men. The remainder of his force made their escape, and afterwards formed on the outskirts of the town, where a fight ensued, the Yankees attacking them. Meantime the two companies of the Chesapeake cavalry, under Lieut. Welford Corbin, made a dash upon t
Yankee Captain (search for this): article 1
he enemy seemed to be fully aware of his position, and at once charged his camp, capturing about twenty-five or thirty of his men. The remainder of his force made their escape, and afterwards formed on the outskirts of the town, where a fight ensued, the Yankees attacking them. Meantime the two companies of the Chesapeake cavalry, under Lieut. Welford Corbin, made a dash upon the guard who had Colonel C.'s men in charge, and succeeded in releasing nearly all of them, besides capturing a Yankee Captain and three privates. In these two skirmishes Mr. M. thinks we had two men killed and one or two wounded. The Yankees had six or seven killed and as many wounded. The Yankees captured state that their force in the neighborhood consisted of an Ohio and an Indiana regiment of cavalry, in all numbering about 1,480 men. It will be perceived by the dispatch of the Associated Press, received at 9 o'clock last night, that the town has been evacuated by the enemy, and that the statement of