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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 28, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
t all is quiet, and that, notwithstanding the boasts of Northern papers that Burnside would lead the Yankee hosts to Richmond in less than ten days, his columns are still quartered on the northern bank of the Rappahannock, without an apparent effort to force its passage. Unless the pressure of the radicals should urge him to advance, it is likely that his "on to Richmond" march will not be resumed until the enemy's forces on the South side of James river are ready to move upon Petersburg or Weldon. His theory no doubt is, that a simultaneous attack from both points would render the capture of the city a feat easy of accomplishment. Meanwhile the public confidence in the ability of our army to resist the invading columns remains unshaken. The people have faith in Gen. Lee and the tried veterans under his command. Since writing the foregoing, we have received information from Gordonsville which indicates that Burnside is moving up the Rappahannock again, some of his forces h
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
g from the neighborhood of Fredericksburg, that all is quiet, and that, notwithstanding the boasts of Northern papers that Burnside would lead the Yankee hosts to Richmond in less than ten days, his columns are still quartered on the northern bank of the Rappahannock, without an apparent effort to force its passage. Unless the pressure of the radicals should urge him to advance, it is likely that his "on to Richmond" march will not be resumed until the enemy's forces on the South side of James river are ready to move upon Petersburg or Weldon. His theory no doubt is, that a simultaneous attack from both points would render the capture of the city a feat easy of accomplishment. Meanwhile the public confidence in the ability of our army to resist the invading columns remains unshaken. The people have faith in Gen. Lee and the tried veterans under his command. Since writing the foregoing, we have received information from Gordonsville which indicates that Burnside is moving
le to gather a single item of interest from the present seat of war. We are told, in answer to inquiries from parties coming from the neighborhood of Fredericksburg, that all is quiet, and that, notwithstanding the boasts of Northern papers that Burnside would lead the Yankee hosts to Richmond in less than ten days, his columns are still quartered on the northern bank of the Rappahannock, without an apparent effort to force its passage. Unless the pressure of the radicals should urge him to advrender the capture of the city a feat easy of accomplishment. Meanwhile the public confidence in the ability of our army to resist the invading columns remains unshaken. The people have faith in Gen. Lee and the tried veterans under his command. Since writing the foregoing, we have received information from Gordonsville which indicates that Burnside is moving up the Rappahannock again, some of his forces having gone up as far as eighteen miles in the direction of Warrenton Junction.
nside would lead the Yankee hosts to Richmond in less than ten days, his columns are still quartered on the northern bank of the Rappahannock, without an apparent effort to force its passage. Unless the pressure of the radicals should urge him to advance, it is likely that his "on to Richmond" march will not be resumed until the enemy's forces on the South side of James river are ready to move upon Petersburg or Weldon. His theory no doubt is, that a simultaneous attack from both points would render the capture of the city a feat easy of accomplishment. Meanwhile the public confidence in the ability of our army to resist the invading columns remains unshaken. The people have faith in Gen. Lee and the tried veterans under his command. Since writing the foregoing, we have received information from Gordonsville which indicates that Burnside is moving up the Rappahannock again, some of his forces having gone up as far as eighteen miles in the direction of Warrenton Junction.