hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 20 0 Browse Search
France (France) 20 0 Browse Search
Zuni (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Chas Johnson 8 0 Browse Search
Henry A. Wise 8 2 Browse Search
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
E. D. Keyes 8 0 Browse Search
F. Smith 8 0 Browse Search
Jacob T. Crowder 8 0 Browse Search
R. N. Wilkinson 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 38 total hits in 8 results.

Blackwater Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
Fighting at Blackwater. A gentleman who came from the line of the Blackwater River on Friday evening, says that the entire Yankee army is supposed to have marched out from Suffolk Thursday afternoon, but the column observed by our scouts numbered only 1,500, consisting of about 1,000 infantry and 500 cavalry. This column moved off in the direction of Isle of Wight Court-House, but at dusk suddenly diverged and bore towards Zuni and Joyner's Ford, bivouacking for the night at the farm of Robert D. Marshall. Zuni and Joyner's Ford, are near the sources of the Blackwater River, and but four miles distant from each other. At day dawn Friday morning the enemy made a simultaneous attack upon our troops at Zuni and Joyner's Ford, there being one company of Col. Claiborne's Rangers at each place. The rangers were dismounted, and fought gallantly, repulsing the enemy at each place, and driving him from the opposite bank of the narrow stream. About 8 o'clock, the enemy's caval
Ivor (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
Joyner's Ford, suddenly made their appearance in the rear of Capt. Sykes's company at Joyner's Ford, charging upon them with a yell, which was distinctly heard at Ivor, three miles distant. Capt. Sykes and, his 35 men were taken prisoners. Capt. S. had dispatched three of his men to Gen. Pryor's headquarters for reinforcemen About 9 o'clock reinforcements came up to Joyner's Ford, and the enemy's cavalry recrossed, but took their prisoners along with them. When the cars left Ivor Friday afternoon, a fight was progressing at Zuni, but up to a late hour last night we were unable to obtain any of the particu- lars. And here we would mentfact which shows that there are black hearted traitors in our midst. During Thursday night, the telegraph wires on the Norfolk line were out at some point between Ivor and Petersburg, and no communication could be had yesterday with headquarters in this place. The Abolition army at Suffolk was supposed to number about 30,000 on
Zuni (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
off in the direction of Isle of Wight Court-House, but at dusk suddenly diverged and bore towards Zuni and Joyner's Ford, bivouacking for the night at the farm of Robert D. Marshall. Zuni and Joyner'Zuni and Joyner's Ford, are near the sources of the Blackwater River, and but four miles distant from each other. At day dawn Friday morning the enemy made a simultaneous attack upon our troops at Zuni and JoyneZuni and Joyner's Ford, there being one company of Col. Claiborne's Rangers at each place. The rangers were dismounted, and fought gallantly, repulsing the enemy at each place, and driving him from the opposite ba About 8 o'clock, the enemy's cavalry having succeeded in fording or swimming the river, between Zuni and Joyner's Ford, suddenly made their appearance in the rear of Capt. Sykes's company at Joyner'soners along with them. When the cars left Ivor Friday afternoon, a fight was progressing at Zuni, but up to a late hour last night we were unable to obtain any of the particu- lars. And he
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
Fighting at Blackwater. A gentleman who came from the line of the Blackwater River on Friday evening, says that the entire Yankee army is supposed to have marched out from Suffolk Thursday afternoon, but the column observed by our scouts numbered only 1,500, consisting of about 1,000 infantry and 500 cavalry. This column moved off in the direction of Isle of Wight Court-House, but at dusk suddenly diverged and bore towards Zuni and Joyner's Ford, bivouacking for the night at the farm of a fight was progressing at Zuni, but up to a late hour last night we were unable to obtain any of the particu- lars. And here we would mention a fact which shows that there are black hearted traitors in our midst. During Thursday night, the telegraph wires on the Norfolk line were out at some point between Ivor and Petersburg, and no communication could be had yesterday with headquarters in this place. The Abolition army at Suffolk was supposed to number about 30,000 on Tuesday last.
Robert D. Marshall (search for this): article 3
ng at Blackwater. A gentleman who came from the line of the Blackwater River on Friday evening, says that the entire Yankee army is supposed to have marched out from Suffolk Thursday afternoon, but the column observed by our scouts numbered only 1,500, consisting of about 1,000 infantry and 500 cavalry. This column moved off in the direction of Isle of Wight Court-House, but at dusk suddenly diverged and bore towards Zuni and Joyner's Ford, bivouacking for the night at the farm of Robert D. Marshall. Zuni and Joyner's Ford, are near the sources of the Blackwater River, and but four miles distant from each other. At day dawn Friday morning the enemy made a simultaneous attack upon our troops at Zuni and Joyner's Ford, there being one company of Col. Claiborne's Rangers at each place. The rangers were dismounted, and fought gallantly, repulsing the enemy at each place, and driving him from the opposite bank of the narrow stream. About 8 o'clock, the enemy's cavalry havin
each place, and driving him from the opposite bank of the narrow stream. About 8 o'clock, the enemy's cavalry having succeeded in fording or swimming the river, between Zuni and Joyner's Ford, suddenly made their appearance in the rear of Capt. Sykes's company at Joyner's Ford, charging upon them with a yell, which was distinctly heard at Ivor, three miles distant. Capt. Sykes and, his 35 men were taken prisoners. Capt. S. had dispatched three of his men to Gen. Pryor's headquarters fCapt. Sykes and, his 35 men were taken prisoners. Capt. S. had dispatched three of his men to Gen. Pryor's headquarters for reinforcements, who were also instructed to remove all the horses and other valuables from the camp. This was accomplished, and the enemy got nothing but the men and their arms who were defending the ford. About 9 o'clock reinforcements came up to Joyner's Ford, and the enemy's cavalry recrossed, but took their prisoners along with them. When the cars left Ivor Friday afternoon, a fight was progressing at Zuni, but up to a late hour last night we were unable to obtain any of the p
repulsing the enemy at each place, and driving him from the opposite bank of the narrow stream. About 8 o'clock, the enemy's cavalry having succeeded in fording or swimming the river, between Zuni and Joyner's Ford, suddenly made their appearance in the rear of Capt. Sykes's company at Joyner's Ford, charging upon them with a yell, which was distinctly heard at Ivor, three miles distant. Capt. Sykes and, his 35 men were taken prisoners. Capt. S. had dispatched three of his men to Gen. Pryor's headquarters for reinforcements, who were also instructed to remove all the horses and other valuables from the camp. This was accomplished, and the enemy got nothing but the men and their arms who were defending the ford. About 9 o'clock reinforcements came up to Joyner's Ford, and the enemy's cavalry recrossed, but took their prisoners along with them. When the cars left Ivor Friday afternoon, a fight was progressing at Zuni, but up to a late hour last night we were unable t
Claiborne (search for this): article 3
bout 1,000 infantry and 500 cavalry. This column moved off in the direction of Isle of Wight Court-House, but at dusk suddenly diverged and bore towards Zuni and Joyner's Ford, bivouacking for the night at the farm of Robert D. Marshall. Zuni and Joyner's Ford, are near the sources of the Blackwater River, and but four miles distant from each other. At day dawn Friday morning the enemy made a simultaneous attack upon our troops at Zuni and Joyner's Ford, there being one company of Col. Claiborne's Rangers at each place. The rangers were dismounted, and fought gallantly, repulsing the enemy at each place, and driving him from the opposite bank of the narrow stream. About 8 o'clock, the enemy's cavalry having succeeded in fording or swimming the river, between Zuni and Joyner's Ford, suddenly made their appearance in the rear of Capt. Sykes's company at Joyner's Ford, charging upon them with a yell, which was distinctly heard at Ivor, three miles distant. Capt. Sykes and, hi