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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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East India (search for this): article 1
otal abandonment of its culture consists in mistaking the nature of the king dom of this potentate. His power is commercial, not financial. It has been one of the leading objects of Lord Palmerston ever since he has been in office to stimulate the production of cotton in his own dominions — or those of his sovereign — to as not to be dependent upon us for a supply. This he cannot do to any extent while his inexperienced producers have to competes with us. Cotton can be raised in their. East India possessions and those on the Western coast of Africa at 18 or 20 cents a pound, but it cannot be raised there proficably to any extent in competition with us at 8 or 10 cents. If assured, however, of no composition from this quarter they could, or it is believed would, after a while, get to producing it as cheaply as we can. Improvements in agriculture are blower in their progress than in any other department of life. No one can safely or wisely say how cheaply cotton may or may not
Crawfordsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The cotton-growing question. The following is an extract from a speech of Hon. A. H. Stephens, at Crawfordville, Ga., on the inst. It will set right the misunderstanding of the public of Mr. Stephens's former remarks on the object of planting cotton: But, besides the products necessary to sustain ourselves to support our armies, and carry on war, we have another clement of tremendous power, if properly used and applied — a recourse and power known in European wars, and unknown to our ancestors in the war of their revolution. Mr. S. here said he alluded to our great staple, cotton; and he should not have said more upon it at this than barely to ask those present to call to their minds what he had said to most of them last year upon that subject, when he addressed them upon the Cotton Loan, but for some misconceptions that have got in the public mind from a para report of some remarks he made at a meeting lately in Sparta. Some, from that report, said Mr. S., have taken t
clad steamers could have been contracted for and built in Europe. Steamers at the cost of two millions each could be procured every way equal to the Monitor. Thirty millions would have got fifteen of these which might have been enough for our purpose. Five might have been ready by the first of January last to open some one of our ports blockaded on our coast. Three of these could have been left to keep the port open, and two could have conveyed the cotton across the water, if necessary. Thos, the debt could have been promptly paid with cotton at a much higher price than it cost and a channel of trade kept open till others and as many more as necessary might have been built and paid for in the same way. At a cost of less than one month's present expenditure on our army our coast might have been cleared. In this way cotton, as a great element of power at our command — such an element as no other people ever had — might have been used not only in breaking up the blockade by our
A. H. Stephens (search for this): article 1
The cotton-growing question. The following is an extract from a speech of Hon. A. H. Stephens, at Crawfordville, Ga., on the inst. It will set right the misunderstanding of the public of Mr. Stephens's former remarks on the object of planting cotton: But, besides the products necessary to sustain ourselves to support our armies, and carry on war, we have another clement of tremendous power, if properly used and applied — a recourse and power known in European wars, and unknown to ouMr. Stephens's former remarks on the object of planting cotton: But, besides the products necessary to sustain ourselves to support our armies, and carry on war, we have another clement of tremendous power, if properly used and applied — a recourse and power known in European wars, and unknown to our ancestors in the war of their revolution. Mr. S. here said he alluded to our great staple, cotton; and he should not have said more upon it at this than barely to ask those present to call to their minds what he had said to most of them last year upon that subject, when he addressed them upon the Cotton Loan, but for some misconceptions that have got in the public mind from a para report of some remarks he made at a meeting lately in Sparta. Some, from that report, said Mr. S., have taken
I urged upon the planters there, first and above all, to grow grain and stock for home consumption and to supply the army. What I said at Sparta upon the subject of cotton, many of you have often heard me say in private conversation, and most of you in the public speech last year, to which I alluded. Cotton, I have maintained, and do maintain, is one of the greatest elements of power, if not the greatest, at our command, if it were but properly and effectually used, as it might be. Jameson's strength was in his locks. Our strength is in our locks — not of hair or wool, but in our looks of cotton. I believed from the beginning that the enemy would inflict upon us more serious injury by the blockade than by all other means combined — It was, in the judgment of all, a matter of the utmost, if not vital importance to have it raised, removed, or broken up. How was it to be done?--That was, and is the question. It was thought by many that such was the demand for cotton in Englan
January, 1 AD (search for this): article 1
nts, with bags of the average commercial weight, would have cost the Government one hundred millions of bonds. With this amount of cotton in hand as pledged any number, short of fifty, of the best iron clad steamers could have been contracted for and built in Europe. Steamers at the cost of two millions each could be procured every way equal to the Monitor. Thirty millions would have got fifteen of these which might have been enough for our purpose. Five might have been ready by the first of January last to open some one of our ports blockaded on our coast. Three of these could have been left to keep the port open, and two could have conveyed the cotton across the water, if necessary. Thos, the debt could have been promptly paid with cotton at a much higher price than it cost and a channel of trade kept open till others and as many more as necessary might have been built and paid for in the same way. At a cost of less than one month's present expenditure on our army our coast mig