hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Gen Burnside 26 0 Browse Search
Gen Floyd 16 0 Browse Search
France (France) 14 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Lee 13 5 Browse Search
Lincoln 11 1 Browse Search
Index 10 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 16 total hits in 8 results.

Brazil, Clay County, Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 11
Alleged Cure for small-pox. A correspondent in Covington sends the following "alleged cure for small-pox." He says he cut it from a paper some years since. The remedy may be a good one, and if so, its publication at this time may be attended with benefit to those who are so unfortunate as to contract that loathsome disease, now becoming so prevalent in different portions of our Confederacy: The United States Consul at the Rio Grande de Sul, Brazil, has transmitted to the Department of State a very interesting communication from Dr. R. Landell, of Post Alegre, claiming the discovery of a cure for the small-pox. Dr. Landell states that the idea of using the remedy to be mentioned first occurred to him during a terrible epidemic of the disease in 1837; but that he first administered it in 1842, since which time his success, and that of his son, Dr. John Landell, and other colleagues in the treatment of small-pox, has been most flattering.--As the Secretary of State has commu
United States (United States) (search for this): article 11
ery of a cure for the small-pox. Dr. Landell states that the idea of using the remedy to be mentioned first occurred to him during a terrible epidemic of the disease in 1837; but that he first administered it in 1842, since which time his success, and that of his son, Dr. John Landell, and other colleagues in the treatment of small-pox, has been most flattering.--As the Secretary of State has communicated Dr. Landell's paper entire to the leading journal of the medical profession in the United States, (says the Washington Union, from which we copy) it is only necessary for our purpose to extract that portion of the paper which discloses the remedy and its proper exhibition: Dissolve the vaccine that is contained in a scab on a pair of plates or a capillary tube, which is about four or six ounces of sold water, and give to the patient a tablespoonful every two or three hours. The favorable result of this exhibition is, that it mitigates the symptoms, modifies the species, an
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 11
Alleged Cure for small-pox. A correspondent in Covington sends the following "alleged cure for small-pox." He says he cut it from a paper some years since. The remedy may be a good one, and if so, its publication at this time may be attended with benefit to those who are so unfortunate as to contract that loathsome disease, now becoming so prevalent in different portions of our Confederacy: The United States Consul at the Rio Grande de Sul, Brazil, has transmitted to the Department of State a very interesting communication from Dr. R. Landell, of Post Alegre, claiming the discovery of a cure for the small-pox. Dr. Landell states that the idea of using the remedy to be mentioned first occurred to him during a terrible epidemic of the disease in 1837; but that he first administered it in 1842, since which time his success, and that of his son, Dr. John Landell, and other colleagues in the treatment of small-pox, has been most flattering.--As the Secretary of State has comm
John Landell (search for this): article 11
pox. Dr. Landell states that the idea of using the remedy to be mentioned first occurred to him during a terrible epidemic of the disease in 1837; but that he first administered it in 1842, since which time his success, and that of his son, Dr. John Landell, and other colleagues in the treatment of small-pox, has been most flattering.--As the Secretary of State has communicated Dr. Landell's paper entire to the leading journal of the medical profession in the United States, (says the WashingtonDr. Landell's paper entire to the leading journal of the medical profession in the United States, (says the Washington Union, from which we copy) it is only necessary for our purpose to extract that portion of the paper which discloses the remedy and its proper exhibition: Dissolve the vaccine that is contained in a scab on a pair of plates or a capillary tube, which is about four or six ounces of sold water, and give to the patient a tablespoonful every two or three hours. The favorable result of this exhibition is, that it mitigates the symptoms, modifies the species, and cures the small-pox.
R. Landell (search for this): article 11
ract that loathsome disease, now becoming so prevalent in different portions of our Confederacy: The United States Consul at the Rio Grande de Sul, Brazil, has transmitted to the Department of State a very interesting communication from Dr. R. Landell, of Post Alegre, claiming the discovery of a cure for the small-pox. Dr. Landell states that the idea of using the remedy to be mentioned first occurred to him during a terrible epidemic of the disease in 1837; but that he first administeredDr. Landell states that the idea of using the remedy to be mentioned first occurred to him during a terrible epidemic of the disease in 1837; but that he first administered it in 1842, since which time his success, and that of his son, Dr. John Landell, and other colleagues in the treatment of small-pox, has been most flattering.--As the Secretary of State has communicated Dr. Landell's paper entire to the leading journal of the medical profession in the United States, (says the Washington Union, from which we copy) it is only necessary for our purpose to extract that portion of the paper which discloses the remedy and its proper exhibition: Dissolve the vac
erm is thickened and in a state of congestion, and in five days becomes dry without suppuration. Applying the same treatment on the fourth or fifth day of the eruption, the small pox become as if they were the true vaccine; fill and dry in the space of ten days, with suppuration. Considering then than the vesicles and pustules ought to be opened, for two or three times, always that they contain any liquid, and beginning the third day to prevent the secondary fever. I have had since 1843 more than thirty cases, and in fourteen paid particular attention; there were three severe continent cases, eleven less severe, although distinct. Since I had recourse to this treatment I have not lost a single patient by the small pox. At my request, some of my colleagues are using this system, and they are well as I, have reaped the most Battering results. These effects are supporter to my expectation, and even to my comprehension; in fact, the vaccine neutralizes the variola vir
who are so unfortunate as to contract that loathsome disease, now becoming so prevalent in different portions of our Confederacy: The United States Consul at the Rio Grande de Sul, Brazil, has transmitted to the Department of State a very interesting communication from Dr. R. Landell, of Post Alegre, claiming the discovery of a cure for the small-pox. Dr. Landell states that the idea of using the remedy to be mentioned first occurred to him during a terrible epidemic of the disease in 1837; but that he first administered it in 1842, since which time his success, and that of his son, Dr. John Landell, and other colleagues in the treatment of small-pox, has been most flattering.--As the Secretary of State has communicated Dr. Landell's paper entire to the leading journal of the medical profession in the United States, (says the Washington Union, from which we copy) it is only necessary for our purpose to extract that portion of the paper which discloses the remedy and its proper
loathsome disease, now becoming so prevalent in different portions of our Confederacy: The United States Consul at the Rio Grande de Sul, Brazil, has transmitted to the Department of State a very interesting communication from Dr. R. Landell, of Post Alegre, claiming the discovery of a cure for the small-pox. Dr. Landell states that the idea of using the remedy to be mentioned first occurred to him during a terrible epidemic of the disease in 1837; but that he first administered it in 1842, since which time his success, and that of his son, Dr. John Landell, and other colleagues in the treatment of small-pox, has been most flattering.--As the Secretary of State has communicated Dr. Landell's paper entire to the leading journal of the medical profession in the United States, (says the Washington Union, from which we copy) it is only necessary for our purpose to extract that portion of the paper which discloses the remedy and its proper exhibition: Dissolve the vaccine that