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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Yazoo River (United States) (search for this): article 7
One of the enemy's "Rams" destroyed by torpedoes on the Yazoo river. --On Friday last, the 12th inst, three gunboats and two "rams" ascended the Yazoo river as far as the "town of St. Charles, or Blake's lower negro quarter. Only of the vessels, however returned--one of the rams having been destroyed by the explosion of pedo. Evidences of the wreck are very abundant, and the point where the smash up occurred has been visited by large numbers. That the boat carried guns of heavy calibreYazoo river as far as the "town of St. Charles, or Blake's lower negro quarter. Only of the vessels, however returned--one of the rams having been destroyed by the explosion of pedo. Evidences of the wreck are very abundant, and the point where the smash up occurred has been visited by large numbers. That the boat carried guns of heavy calibre is proven by the large sponge staffs which were found. Among the other relics of the wreck is the following epistle indicates the designs of the fleet on the "town of St. Charles:" December 10, 1862. Dear Wife. I write these few lines to you hoping they will find you both in good health as this leaves me at present. Thank God for his goodness towards us all. Dear, the letter I sent you dated the 8th I hope you will excuse it for not being finished, but the mail was just going off
St. Charles, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 7
s" destroyed by torpedoes on the Yazoo river. --On Friday last, the 12th inst, three gunboats and two "rams" ascended the Yazoo river as far as the "town of St. Charles, or Blake's lower negro quarter. Only of the vessels, however returned--one of the rams having been destroyed by the explosion of pedo. Evidences of the wreckn by the large sponge staffs which were found. Among the other relics of the wreck is the following epistle indicates the designs of the fleet on the "town of St. Charles:" December 10, 1862. Dear Wife. I write these few lines to you hoping they will find you both in good health as this leaves me at present. Thank God red to you. We have been up the Yazoo. We were to-day within four miles of Vicksburg. We do not see any gunboats of any kind; but when we got to a town called St. Charles, (Blake's lower negro quarter,) we got within a quarter of a mile of it, we came to two torpedoes in the river, which exploded, but did us no harm. We then cam
Yazoo City (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 7
ng off and I had only just time to get it in. Dear, the man that was shot in the arm had it took off the same evening. We are still lying within about 12 miles of Vicksburg. All is quiet so far. The weather is very warm in the day time, but rather cool of nights and mornings. The leaves are on the trees in a good many places, and grass on the ground pretty green. It is warm enough to go in your shirt sleeves, and be comfortable. Dear, we have not got any money yet I think we shall go up Yazoo to morrow. If we do I expect we shall see some warm work. The rebels are well fortified, and I should not be surprised if we don't lose quite a number of men before we get back. I must bid you good night and may God bless you and our darling is the warmest prayer of your husband, till death. Wm. Yates. Cheer up, love, and all will be well, I hope — Kiss our darling boy for me, and don't forget your self. December 11, 1862. Dear Ann: I am still spared to you. We have been up
One of the enemy's "Rams" destroyed by torpedoes on the Yazoo river. --On Friday last, the 12th inst, three gunboats and two "rams" ascended the Yazoo river as far as the "town of St. Charles, or Blake's lower negro quarter. Only of the vessels, however returned--one of the rams having been destroyed by the explosion of pedo. Evidences of the wreck are very abundant, and the point where the smash up occurred has been visited by large numbers. That the boat carried guns of heavy calibreforget your self. December 11, 1862. Dear Ann: I am still spared to you. We have been up the Yazoo. We were to-day within four miles of Vicksburg. We do not see any gunboats of any kind; but when we got to a town called St. Charles, (Blake's lower negro quarter,) we got within a quarter of a mile of it, we came to two torpedoes in the river, which exploded, but did us no harm. We then came back to the fleet. I think it is likely that we shall go again to-morrow, and blow the town
William Yates (search for this): article 7
s in a good many places, and grass on the ground pretty green. It is warm enough to go in your shirt sleeves, and be comfortable. Dear, we have not got any money yet I think we shall go up Yazoo to morrow. If we do I expect we shall see some warm work. The rebels are well fortified, and I should not be surprised if we don't lose quite a number of men before we get back. I must bid you good night and may God bless you and our darling is the warmest prayer of your husband, till death. Wm. Yates. Cheer up, love, and all will be well, I hope — Kiss our darling boy for me, and don't forget your self. December 11, 1862. Dear Ann: I am still spared to you. We have been up the Yazoo. We were to-day within four miles of Vicksburg. We do not see any gunboats of any kind; but when we got to a town called St. Charles, (Blake's lower negro quarter,) we got within a quarter of a mile of it, we came to two torpedoes in the river, which exploded, but did us no harm. We then came
December 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 7
s, or Blake's lower negro quarter. Only of the vessels, however returned--one of the rams having been destroyed by the explosion of pedo. Evidences of the wreck are very abundant, and the point where the smash up occurred has been visited by large numbers. That the boat carried guns of heavy calibre is proven by the large sponge staffs which were found. Among the other relics of the wreck is the following epistle indicates the designs of the fleet on the "town of St. Charles:" December 10, 1862. Dear Wife. I write these few lines to you hoping they will find you both in good health as this leaves me at present. Thank God for his goodness towards us all. Dear, the letter I sent you dated the 8th I hope you will excuse it for not being finished, but the mail was just going off and I had only just time to get it in. Dear, the man that was shot in the arm had it took off the same evening. We are still lying within about 12 miles of Vicksburg. All is quiet so far. The weat
December 11th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 7
able. Dear, we have not got any money yet I think we shall go up Yazoo to morrow. If we do I expect we shall see some warm work. The rebels are well fortified, and I should not be surprised if we don't lose quite a number of men before we get back. I must bid you good night and may God bless you and our darling is the warmest prayer of your husband, till death. Wm. Yates. Cheer up, love, and all will be well, I hope — Kiss our darling boy for me, and don't forget your self. December 11, 1862. Dear Ann: I am still spared to you. We have been up the Yazoo. We were to-day within four miles of Vicksburg. We do not see any gunboats of any kind; but when we got to a town called St. Charles, (Blake's lower negro quarter,) we got within a quarter of a mile of it, we came to two torpedoes in the river, which exploded, but did us no harm. We then came back to the fleet. I think it is likely that we shall go again to-morrow, and blow the town down. I hope so, anyhow. Good