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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 30, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
. It was doubtless a cheering scene. The correspondence from the army shows the army to be still (or a part of it,) at Falmouth, the letter-writers declaring that Burnside is a commander of "dash," but his "dash" falled through an accident. Mrore remarkable for what it than what it contains. There is not a word in it about the failure to have the pontoons at Falmouth at the proper time, which all the evidence taken by the committee shows to have been the prime cause of the disaster, aner to have the pontoons in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry sent to Washington, with a view to their being taken thence to Falmouth in the event of his upon a change of base. On the 7th or 8th. Burnside received the order investing him with the commrsed with Burnside the plan he proposed, and part of that plan was that Halleck should send down pontoons immediately to Falmouth for the purpose of crossing the river. So important was haste that he then and there sent a dispatch to Gen. Woodbury,
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
y will amount to much. A row occurred between Washington and New York on Wednesday night, by a negro demanding a sleeping both on a railroad car, and being sustained by Vice President Hamlin in the demand.--The conductor, however, overruled the "Vice President," and the negro was ejected. The following items from the Washington correspondence of the New York Herald, dated the 25th inst., will be found interesting: The President Exsected to Veto the bill Creating the New State of West Virginia. There is reason to believe that the President will return to Congress, with his objections, the bill for the erection of West Virginia into a separate State. Col. Forney and the weak Sacked Republicans. Col. Forney's organ is busy whipping in weak backed Republicans, who are already croaking about the necessity of recognizing the Southern Confederacy. In this list are found a number of Republican members of Congress, who openly express despair of the success of the Feder
Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
red in the preliminary proclamation, and precluded for the present any other representation of the loyalty of the people than can be furnished by the assurances of men of undoubted patriotism, who are familiar with the people of that State, Similar representations have been made on the part of the people of the 8th Congressional District of Virginia, known as the Harper's Ferry District, composed of the counties of Hampshire, Page, Warren, Clarke, Berkeley, Jefferson, Frederick, Morgan, and Loudoun. Numerous letters have been received here by the Marshal of the District of Columbia, a native of that section, and other prominent residents of Washington, complaining bitterly of the failure of Gov. Pierpoint to order an election. There was a time when it might have been held with comparative safety, and the Union sentiment of the district been freely represented. The responsibility for the Fredericksburg disaster — report of the Congressional Committee on the War. [From the N. Y.
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
s proved to be the delay on the part of the War Department in sending forward the pontoons, as agreed to by Gen. Halleck. With his usual foresight, Gen. McClellan, on the 6th of November, had dispatched an order to have the pontoons in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry sent to Washington, with a view to their being taken thence to Falmouth in the event of his upon a change of base. On the 7th or 8th. Burnside received the order investing him with the command Halleck and Meigs went down to Warrenton, and on the nights of the 11th and 12th of November discoursed with Burnside the plan he proposed, and part of that plan was that Halleck should send down pontoons immediately to Falmouth for the purpose of crossing the river. So important was haste that he then and there sent a dispatch to Gen. Woodbury, commanding the engineer brigade, to transport all the pontoon and bridge materials to Aquia Creek. On the 14th, Burnside, feeling uneasy that he had received no intelligence that the po
Hampshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 4
r soil by contending armies has prevented the holding of elections, as required in the preliminary proclamation, and precluded for the present any other representation of the loyalty of the people than can be furnished by the assurances of men of undoubted patriotism, who are familiar with the people of that State, Similar representations have been made on the part of the people of the 8th Congressional District of Virginia, known as the Harper's Ferry District, composed of the counties of Hampshire, Page, Warren, Clarke, Berkeley, Jefferson, Frederick, Morgan, and Loudoun. Numerous letters have been received here by the Marshal of the District of Columbia, a native of that section, and other prominent residents of Washington, complaining bitterly of the failure of Gov. Pierpoint to order an election. There was a time when it might have been held with comparative safety, and the Union sentiment of the district been freely represented. The responsibility for the Fredericksburg d
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
ates and parts of States as have furnished evidences of loyalty, but have been prevented by the presence of a hostile army from complying with the terms of his proclamation of the 22d of September A strong protest has been presented to him from Tennessee, signed by Gov. Johnson and a large number of the most noted loyal Tennessean, claiming to be exempt from the emancipation proclamation upon the ground that, if an opportunity were offered to the people of Tennessee to express themselves, unmisTennessee to express themselves, unmistakable evidences of the loyalty of a majority of them would be shown; but that the occupation of their soil by contending armies has prevented the holding of elections, as required in the preliminary proclamation, and precluded for the present any other representation of the loyalty of the people than can be furnished by the assurances of men of undoubted patriotism, who are familiar with the people of that State, Similar representations have been made on the part of the people of the 8th Cong
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
o be the delay on the part of the War Department in sending forward the pontoons, as agreed to by Gen. Halleck. With his usual foresight, Gen. McClellan, on the 6th of November, had dispatched an order to have the pontoons in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry sent to Washington, with a view to their being taken thence to Falmouth in the event of his upon a change of base. On the 7th or 8th. Burnside received the order investing him with the command Halleck and Meigs went down to Warrenton, and the part of a mere clerk, copying orders but not seeing that they are carried out. He neither plans campaigns, nor gives efficient assistance to the Generals who do plan and fight them. The necessary supplies were withheld from McClellan at Harper's Ferry, at the time that the radical journals were clamoring against him for not moving on, and so it has been in the case of Burnside Gen. Franklin swears that, notwithstanding the delay of the pontoons, the position of the enemy would have been ca
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
Burnside received the order investing him with the command Halleck and Meigs went down to Warrenton, and on the nights of the 11th and 12th of November discoursed with Burnside the plan he proposed, and part of that plan was that Halleck should send down pontoons immediately to Falmouth for the purpose of crossing the river. So important was haste that he then and there sent a dispatch to Gen. Woodbury, commanding the engineer brigade, to transport all the pontoon and bridge materials to Aquia Creek. On the 14th, Burnside, feeling uneasy that he had received no intelligence that the pontoons had started, telegraphed to General Woodbury and Major Spaulding. It turned out that this was the first time that they had ever heard of the pontoons. Although Burnside had sent his plan to the authorities at Washington on the 9th, it was not till the 19th that the pontoons started, and they did not arrive till the 22d or 23d of November--ten days toe late, and when Lee had ample time to conce
Richard Lee (search for this): article 4
army in Virginia he made a sad business of it. Jackson is an enterprising brilliant General, with 20,000 or 30,000 men under his command; but give him the army that Lee commands, and the chances are ten to one that he would fail. The genius of McClellan is very like that of Lee, and he is the only man we know of at present who is Lee, and he is the only man we know of at present who is able to cope with him. Gen. Scott indicated him as the best commander for the whole army, and it is the rashest presumption on the part of more civilians--third rate lawyers — to remove him from it, and put in his place General untried upon a large scale. It is true, that the greatest Generals the world ever saw took command of ars at Washington on the 9th, it was not till the 19th that the pontoons started, and they did not arrive till the 22d or 23d of November--ten days toe late, and when Lee had ample time to concentrate his troops and fortify his position. Gen. Woodbury testifies that he did not receive information in time as to the movement which
McClellan is very like that of Lee, and he is the only man we know of at present who is able to cope with him. Gen. Scott indicated him as the best commander for the whole army, and it is the rashest presumption on the part of more civilians--third rate lawyers — to remove him from it, and put in his place General untried upon a large scale. It is true, that the greatest Generals the world ever saw took command of armies without ever having led a regiment against the enemy, Peter the Great, Conde, Frederick, and Napoleon, are examples, But these are exceptions to the general role, and we would be woefully deceived by following the exceptions instead of the rule — Even Napoleon — a General of such surpassing genius — did not suddenly assume the command of large armies. It was only by degrees that he acquired the skill to wield vast masses of men. McClellan with his larger experience and greater military knowledge, would not have assailed so strong a position as that of the enemy be
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