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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 1, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
Whatever they were, we have no more doubt than we have of our own existence that Mr Greene came from Mr. Davis at Richmond to President Lincoln at Washington, and we have no more doubt than we have of our own existence that the Administration at Washington believe that he thus cames. We reserve further comment on the extraordinary attitude of the administration and mean while perhaps the public will hear from Mr. Greene again in our next issue. Arrests in Western Virginia. The Wheeling (Va.) Press gives the following samples of despotism in that overrun section of the State: On Saturday James Herriott, of this city, who was some time ago admitted to ball upon an indictment for treason, in the U. S. Court, having recently been using treasonable language in discouragement of enlistments was arrested by Deputy Marshal Irwin, and lodged in the Athen where we trust he will remain until tried. Miss Eliza Hughes, M. D. sister of the well known Dr. Alfred Hughes, now a
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 7
two or three days earlier the Administration authorized the statement to be telegraphed to the country that no communication embodying peace propositions has been made to them in any way. Let us exercise patience, and trust that we shall yet extort the truth in this business even from the Administration. We now desire to put a few specific questions to the Administration. 1. Do the Administration deny that the President received a letter from Mr. J. Wesley Greene, date Pittsburg Pa., November 10th, 1862 containing certain information concerning an alleged visit of Mr. Greene to Richmond? 2. Do the Administration deny that on the 15th of November the Secretary of War sent a tole graphic dispatch to Mr. J. Wesley Greene, at Pittsburg, requesting him to come immediately to Washington, and that at the same time the war Department provided transportation for Mr. Greene from Pittsburg to Washington? 3. Do the Administration deny that, in response to the dispatch of the
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
o have been sincere. Whatever they were, we have no more doubt than we have of our own existence that Mr Greene came from Mr. Davis at Richmond to President Lincoln at Washington, and we have no more doubt than we have of our own existence that the Administration at Washington believe that he thus cames. We reserve further comment on the extraordinary attitude of the administration and mean while perhaps the public will hear from Mr. Greene again in our next issue. Arrests in Western Virginia. The Wheeling (Va.) Press gives the following samples of despotism in that overrun section of the State: On Saturday James Herriott, of this city, who was some time ago admitted to ball upon an indictment for treason, in the U. S. Court, having recently been using treasonable language in discouragement of enlistments was arrested by Deputy Marshal Irwin, and lodged in the Athen where we trust he will remain until tried. Miss Eliza Hughes, M. D. sister of the well known Dr
Saturday James Herriott (search for this): article 7
chmond to President Lincoln at Washington, and we have no more doubt than we have of our own existence that the Administration at Washington believe that he thus cames. We reserve further comment on the extraordinary attitude of the administration and mean while perhaps the public will hear from Mr. Greene again in our next issue. Arrests in Western Virginia. The Wheeling (Va.) Press gives the following samples of despotism in that overrun section of the State: On Saturday James Herriott, of this city, who was some time ago admitted to ball upon an indictment for treason, in the U. S. Court, having recently been using treasonable language in discouragement of enlistments was arrested by Deputy Marshal Irwin, and lodged in the Athen where we trust he will remain until tried. Miss Eliza Hughes, M. D. sister of the well known Dr. Alfred Hughes, now an inmate of Camp chase, was arrested and lodged in the Athen on Saturday, for refusing to take the oath of allegian
Gen Butler (search for this): article 7
ess of the war, from lack of sinews to make it move. Jeff. Davis's Fulmination against General Butler. [From the Washington Chronicle,Dec. 27] We publish this morning a proclamation of the President of the so called Southern Confederacy aimed expressly and definitely at Gen. Butler, our energetic commander at New Orleans. We think our readers will justify us in characterizing this as t the royalist party — the centre around which all the opponents of the rebellion raided. But Gen. Butler is simply a subordinate, commanding a small department, obeying the orders of his superiors, ernment. For menus the New York World and Herald have teemed with the grossest slanders upon Gen. Butler, and have clamored most furiously for his removal. The capture of New Orleans was the hardest blow the Secessionists have yet received. The vigorous administration of Gen Butler, and his eternal vigilance which has prevented the enemy from getting at him or getting out of his has exaspera
e President, in many things, to yield to their demands against his own ingenious and conservative views, and in order to secure the wave and means to carry on the war. The abolition eradicate, then, and their managing agents in the Cabinet and War Office, are surpassable, in their disorganizing schemes and intrigues, for all the felling, and disasters of the war, including a derangement of our financial affairs and a of dollars a day to the national debt. Nor have we any doubt that Mr. Secretary Chase has been the prime mover in all these radical schemes, and an active no worker with his confederates of the Senate against Mr. Seward. Upon its face the volunteered resignation of the Secretary of the Treasury is very plausible; but it was, we suspect, only an adroit device to escape the consequences threatened him under cover of the smoke around him. The question, then, still recurs, is there any hops for a vigorous, harmonious, and successful prosecution of this war under the c
re cannot save it. The financial consideration involved in the appointment of the successors of the present imbeciles are of the gravest character, and ought to have a decided influence on the President's choice. The radicals intend to return the charge against Mr. Seward as soon as the present excitement subsides; but whether it will subside remains to be seen. If they succeed in forcing him out of the Cabinet, and causing other vacancies in order to have them filled up by such men as Sumner, Wade, and Fessenden, the war for the Union would be soon brought to a dead halt for want of the means to carry it on. The bankers and the moneyed interest in the large cities., who are practical men of business have no confidence in the radical faction, and will not lend money to be placed at the disposal of visionary fanatics, to squander it recklessly, and with it the lives of thousands of brave men without accomplishing any legitimate object of the war. The faction have already to misman
Fessenden (search for this): article 7
he financial consideration involved in the appointment of the successors of the present imbeciles are of the gravest character, and ought to have a decided influence on the President's choice. The radicals intend to return the charge against Mr. Seward as soon as the present excitement subsides; but whether it will subside remains to be seen. If they succeed in forcing him out of the Cabinet, and causing other vacancies in order to have them filled up by such men as Sumner, Wade, and Fessenden, the war for the Union would be soon brought to a dead halt for want of the means to carry it on. The bankers and the moneyed interest in the large cities., who are practical men of business have no confidence in the radical faction, and will not lend money to be placed at the disposal of visionary fanatics, to squander it recklessly, and with it the lives of thousands of brave men without accomplishing any legitimate object of the war. The faction have already to mismanaged the finances e
Eliza Hughes (search for this): article 7
in our next issue. Arrests in Western Virginia. The Wheeling (Va.) Press gives the following samples of despotism in that overrun section of the State: On Saturday James Herriott, of this city, who was some time ago admitted to ball upon an indictment for treason, in the U. S. Court, having recently been using treasonable language in discouragement of enlistments was arrested by Deputy Marshal Irwin, and lodged in the Athen where we trust he will remain until tried. Miss Eliza Hughes, M. D. sister of the well known Dr. Alfred Hughes, now an inmate of Camp chase, was arrested and lodged in the Athen on Saturday, for refusing to take the oath of allegiance, by order of Provost Marshal Darr, Subsequently Miss Hughes, having complained of being unwell, sent for Major Darr, and agreed to take the oath, which secured her release. Frank Vennum, a river man of this city, was also arrested, but look the oath. Likewise Miss Nancy Dqun. Acknowledgment of Confederat
ton, Dec. 10--J Wesley Greene, who furnished the Chicago Times some reported peace propositions from Jeff. Davis to President Lincoln, in an impostor. He came to Washington to see President Lincoln. who ascertained that there was no ground for hisPresident Lincoln. who ascertained that there was no ground for his nonsensical statements, " This was plain, blunt, and But as if not satisfied with this disposition of the matter, an hour or two later the Administration telegraphed to the country as follows: "Washington, Dec. 10.--On enquiry, it is hey were, we have no more doubt than we have of our own existence that Mr Greene came from Mr. Davis at Richmond to President Lincoln at Washington, and we have no more doubt than we have of our own existence that the Administration at Washington bents only a small popular of the loyal States, while the conserve supported by a substantial majority of the --Lot President Lincoln assume the responsibility to side with the public sentiment of the country, and he will be strong enough to command
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