hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Columbus Lee 16 0 Browse Search
Burnside 12 8 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Butler 8 0 Browse Search
Sheridan Knowles 8 0 Browse Search
Nassau River (Florida, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 6 0 Browse Search
Chase 6 2 Browse Search
Gen Stuart 6 0 Browse Search
Seward 5 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 2, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 24 total hits in 17 results.

1 2
Drury lane (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 13
Death of Sheridan Knowles. --Sheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are
Belfast, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 13
Death of Sheridan Knowles. --Sheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are
Robert Peel (search for this): article 13
d it was curious to see the interest with which the good, pious women of the May meetings looked up from their knitting or their provision bag to base at the strange being who had been a play actor, my dear, but was happily converted, and so forth.--Knowles was an earnest man in his last as in his earlier vocations, but in his curiousness he lost none of his old cheerfulness of spirit. He did not become a retired monk, like Ballico, and Gerald Griffin, but was still a good man of the world while busiest in showing the way to the next. He was a capital story teller, and a smoker of the good old school of men who seemed inspired by the pipes which rested on their lips. His dignity as post he asserted by declining a small annuity offered him; but he accepted one of $200 per annum, conferred by Sir Robert Peel. His last days were spent patiently amid much pain, and he pursed away calmly in his seventy-eighth year, leaving a reputation in an age when reputations are not easily made."
William Tell (search for this): article 13
Death of Sheridan Knowles. --Sheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are
gland, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are wont to be in their own country, and gentlemen are who, being heroes, are not so to the
Bethnal Green (search for this): article 13
an Knowles. --Sheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are wont to be in th
Sheridan Knowles (search for this): article 13
Death of Sheridan Knowles. --Sheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twentySheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind res in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are wont to be in their own coprovision bag to base at the strange being who had been a play actor, my dear, but was happily converted, and so forth.--Knowles was an earnest man in his last as in his earlier vocations, but in his curiousness he lost none of his old cheerfulness
Death of Sheridan Knowles. --Sheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are
Death of Sheridan Knowles. --Sheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are
Edmund Kean (search for this): article 13
Death of Sheridan Knowles. --Sheridan Knowles, the dramatist, has just died in England, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was born in Cork, when Kemble and Siddons were in the first day of their triumphs at Drury Lane. At the age of twenty-four he made the acquaintance of Edmund Kean, for whom he wrote his first play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are
1 2