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New England (United States) (search for this): article 5
om their families here to free negroes South, and this idea, you may rely upon it, will be worked out in the message. He will, at the same time reiterate his determination to push on the war for the suppression of the rebellion, pledging all the resources of New York, in men and money, if the President will but go for the "Union as it was, and the Constitution as it is." Another writer remarks that it is said that Governor Seymour's message will make a studied and venomous attack on New England, and, perhaps intimate a willingness for her expulsion from the Union as a necessary step to induce the South to return. The return of the Secretaries to the Yankee Cabinet — a most pleasant affair all around. The New York Tribunes has a short article on the recent resignations and return of Lincoln's Ministers. It appears after all that it was a delightful little joke and "pleasant" to all hands concerned.--It says: Those who hall the return of Mr. Seward to the State Depa
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
er.--I think it will amount to about ten thousand, altogether. Question — Have you any knowledge of the less of the enemy? Answer — I have not, except what I saw incidentally in a Richmond paper. Question.--Do I understand you to say that you concurred in the movement to cross the river? Answer — It was not my opinion that we could cross at any of the points indicated. Question.--Will you state whether or not it is your opinion that if the movement of the army from Warrenton had been delayed until the time the pontoons arrived here the army could have then come here, and with those pontoons have made a crossing here and occupied the Heights before the enemy could have reached here in sufficient force to have prevented it? Answer.--Yes, sir, that is my opinion. Question.--Then it is your opinion that if it had been ascertained that the pontoons could not possibly be here at the time Gen. Burnside expected them to be here, he should have been notified <
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): article 5
oons had been here? Answer.--That corps was to have crossed at once and taken possession of the heights. If the pontoons had been here there would have been very little difficulty in doing that. What Gov. Seymour Intends to do. Gov. Seymour assumed control of the State Government of New York yesterday. A New York letter-writer, in noticing the remark of a Washington correspondent, that it was understood there that Governor Seymour will allow of no more arbitrary arrests in New York State, says: The writer is perfectly correct (as I happen to know) as to the arbitrary arrests. The Governor's message, which is now about finished, and which will be sent in to the Legislature a week from tomorrow, will take unequivocal ground in that respect, but more immediately important than that, perhaps, will be the declared determination to permit no draft in this State unless the Federal Administration recede from its emancipation policy. I give you this as a matter of ne
t know what was behind them, or how much of a force the enemy had there. I know that wherever we appeared we found a great many more then than we had. I would like to impress as firmly upon the committee as it is impressed upon my mind, the fact that the whole disaster has resulted from the delay in the arrival of the pontoon bridges. Whoever is responsible for the delay is responsible for all the disasters which have followed. We were rather astonished when we came down here to find that Sumner had been here for some days and had not received the pontoon bridges. I think that is the main cause for this disaster. Question.--Do you know what the expectation was as to the pontoons being here? On the arrival of the first army corps that would get here, was it expected that the pontoons would be here? Answer.--Certainly, it was expected they would be here. Question.--What was that corps to have done if pontoons had been here? Answer.--That corps was to have crossed
Eugene Fuller (search for this): article 5
to the Senate for action that shall be at once wise and brave, and comport with the dignity and the rights of the representatives of States. Death of a fighting Chaplain. Rev. Arthur B. Fuller, Chaplain of a Massachusetts regiment, who was killed at Fredericksburg, was buried at Boston on Christmas eve. The Boston Journal says: There has been a singular fatality attached to the family of the lamented Chaplain Fuller. Three of the family have perished by untimely deaths. Eugene Fuller, one of the sons, was drowned on the voyage from New York to New Orleans in 1859, the same year that the mother died. Margaret Fuller, Countess of Cossoll, perished by shipwreck, on Fire Island, near New York, in 1850. She was returning, from Italy to her native land, from which she had long been absent. Her husband and child were lost with her. And now Arthur B. Fuller has been killed in battle. In every instance the surviving members of the family received the sad tidings by telegr
Seymour Intends (search for this): article 5
t the expectation was as to the pontoons being here? On the arrival of the first army corps that would get here, was it expected that the pontoons would be here? Answer.--Certainly, it was expected they would be here. Question.--What was that corps to have done if pontoons had been here? Answer.--That corps was to have crossed at once and taken possession of the heights. If the pontoons had been here there would have been very little difficulty in doing that. What Gov. Seymour Intends to do. Gov. Seymour assumed control of the State Government of New York yesterday. A New York letter-writer, in noticing the remark of a Washington correspondent, that it was understood there that Governor Seymour will allow of no more arbitrary arrests in New York State, says: The writer is perfectly correct (as I happen to know) as to the arbitrary arrests. The Governor's message, which is now about finished, and which will be sent in to the Legislature a week from tomor
hose who hall the return of Mr. Seward to the State Department as the salvation of the country ascribe the merit of the work which brought it about jointly to Secretary Chase and the President, Mr. Chase having sent in his resignation, is said to have firmly refused to withdraw it if Mr. Seward retired from the Cabinet. The PresidMr. Chase having sent in his resignation, is said to have firmly refused to withdraw it if Mr. Seward retired from the Cabinet. The President as firmly refused to accept the resignation of either. To Mr. Seward he said that, although his feelings and interests perhaps distasted his withdrew from the Cabinet at this juncture, patrician required him to stay and help him through his Administration; and as his in leaving would do. prive him of the services of a Secreermined to support. This was the spirit of the caucus as well as of the committee. What course the Republican Senators will take, now that Secretaries Seward and Chase have withdrawn their resignations, we have no means of knowing. It is not becoming that we publish the rumors in regard to them. But it is significant that all i
ittle joke and "pleasant" to all hands concerned.--It says: Those who hall the return of Mr. Seward to the State Department as the salvation of the country ascribe the merit of the work which brnt, Mr. Chase having sent in his resignation, is said to have firmly refused to withdraw it if Mr. Seward retired from the Cabinet. The President as firmly refused to accept the resignation of either. To Mr. Seward he said that, although his feelings and interests perhaps distasted his withdrew from the Cabinet at this juncture, patrician required him to stay and help him through his Administratbers of the committee, (the dissentient being Mr. Harris) mount to intimate an opinion that Secretary Seward ought to be among the retiring ministers; not because he was personally objectionable, but ucus as well as of the committee. What course the Republican Senators will take, now that Secretaries Seward and Chase have withdrawn their resignations, we have no means of knowing. It is not becom
e to had it, and I brought up all the troops in reserve to hold that position; I held that position until I was ordered to recross the river, and from what I threw of our want of success on the right, and of the demoralized condition of the troops on the right and centre, as represented to me by their commanders, confess that I believe the order to recross was a very proper one. We recrossed on the night of the 15th, without the loss of a man, and with no trouble at all. Question by Mr. Gooch--Had the pontoons been here at the time of the arrival of the army, what would have probably been the result? Answer.--The probable result would have been that the army as much of it as General Burnside supposed was necessary, would have immediately crossed the river, driving away the enemy here, perhaps five hundred or one thousand men, and they would have occupied the very heights which we have since been obliged to attack; and that crossing would have been permanent and successful.
Progress of the War. As a part of the history of the war, and of one of the heaviest disasters yet sustained by the Yankees we publish the evidence given before the Investigating Committee in Washington by Maj-Gen. Franklin. He said the advance of the army war immediately proceeded with after the conference of Halleck and Meigs with Burnside. He said: I understand from Gen. Burnside that when the advance of his army arrived a front of Fredericksburg a pontoon train, enough build two bridges, was to meet him there. I know the advance of the army did arrive at Fredericksburg at the proper time, but there was no pontoon train to meet it there, and in consequence of that the army could not cross at the time we expected to cross. We were, therefore, delayed several days in consequence of the delay in the arrival of the pontoon train. After arriving here we accumulated provisions for twelve days. Then Gen. Burnside called a council, in which it was the unanimous opinion. I
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