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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 6, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
Dowell has been ordered to march upon that city by the shortest route. He is ordered — keeping himself always in a position to cover the capital from all possible attack — so to operate as to put, his left wing in communication with your right, and you are instructed to co-operate so as to establish this communication as soon as possible, by extending your right wing to the north of Richmond.--It is believed that this communication can be safely established, either north or south of the Pamunkey river. In any event you will be able to prevent the main body of the enemy's forces from leaving Richmond and falling in overwhelming force upon General McDowell. He will move with between thirty-five and forty thousand men. A copy of the instructions to Major-Gen. McDowell are with this. The specific task a signed to his command has been to provide against any danger to the capital of the nation. At your earliest call for reinforcements he is sent forward to co-operate in the reduction of
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
efensive purposes, but not with a view to make a forward movement. (Signed) H. Van Renssleer. Inspector General. War Department, Washington,May 17, 1862. To Maj. Gen. McDowell, Commanding Department of the Rappahannock: General: Upon being joined by Shields's division, you will move upon Richmond by the general route of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad, co-operating with the forces under Gen. McClellan, now threatening Richmond from the line of the Patounkey and James rivers. While seeking to establish, as soon as possible, communication between your left wing and the right wing of McClellan, you will hold yourself always in such a position as to cover the capital of the nation against a sudden dash by any large body of the rebel forces. Gen. McClellan will be furnished with a copy of these instructions, and will be directed to hold himself in readiness to establish communication with your left, and prevent the main body of the enemy's army from leaving Ric
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
s to you in relation to that co-operation. Major-Gen. Shields will join me to-day as soon as the necessary preparations for the march can be completed, which I think will be by the 24th instant. We shall set forward in the general direction ordered. There is in front of us to impede our advance the secession army of the Rappahannock, so called, under the command of J. R. Anderson, of the Tredegar Iron Works. His force is from twelve to fifteen thousand men, mostly South Carolina and Georgia troops. We should engage this force on our first day's march, as they are within six or eight miles of us, posted on and to the right and left of the F. and R. railroad, and in a position of considerable strength. It is my purpose to turn their position by throwing a large force on their left flank, and cut off their opportunity of receiving any reinforcements from the direction of Gordonsville, and at the same time endeavor to save the railroad bridges. If this can be done another chann
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
ion on your right his supplies must be drawn from West Point, and you will Instruct your staff officers to be prepared to supply him by that route. The President directs that Gen. McDowell retain command of the Department of the Rappahannock and forces with which he moves forward. (Signed) E. M. Stanton, Sec'y of War. Gen. McDowell to Gen. McClellan. Headq's Dep't of Rappahannock,Opposite Fredericksburg,May 20, 1862. Major-Gen. George B. McClellan, Com'g Army of the Potomac, White House, Va.: I have received the orders of the Secretary of War to move with the army under my command and co-operate with yours in the reduction of Richmond, and also a copy of his instructions to you in relation to that co-operation. Major-Gen. Shields will join me to-day as soon as the necessary preparations for the march can be completed, which I think will be by the 24th instant. We shall set forward in the general direction ordered. There is in front of us to impede our advance th
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
his instructions to you in relation to that co-operation. Major-Gen. Shields will join me to-day as soon as the necessary preparations for the march can be completed, which I think will be by the 24th instant. We shall set forward in the general direction ordered. There is in front of us to impede our advance the secession army of the Rappahannock, so called, under the command of J. R. Anderson, of the Tredegar Iron Works. His force is from twelve to fifteen thousand men, mostly South Carolina and Georgia troops. We should engage this force on our first day's march, as they are within six or eight miles of us, posted on and to the right and left of the F. and R. railroad, and in a position of considerable strength. It is my purpose to turn their position by throwing a large force on their left flank, and cut off their opportunity of receiving any reinforcements from the direction of Gordonsville, and at the same time endeavor to save the railroad bridges. If this can be don
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
for reinforcements he is sent forward to co-operate in the reduction of Richmond, but charged, in attempting this, not to uncover the city of Washington, and you will give no orders, either before or after your junction, which can put him out of position to cover this city. You and he will communicate with each other by telegraph, or otherwise, as frequently as may be necessary for efficient co-operation. When General McDowell is in position on your right his supplies must be drawn from West Point, and you will Instruct your staff officers to be prepared to supply him by that route. The President directs that Gen. McDowell retain command of the Department of the Rappahannock and forces with which he moves forward. (Signed) E. M. Stanton, Sec'y of War. Gen. McDowell to Gen. McClellan. Headq's Dep't of Rappahannock,Opposite Fredericksburg,May 20, 1862. Major-Gen. George B. McClellan, Com'g Army of the Potomac, White House, Va.: I have received the orders of the Secret
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
tions to Gen. McClellan. War Department.Washington,May 17th, 1862. Maj. Gen. Geo. B. McClellan, Commanding Army of the Potomac before Richmond: General: Your dispatch to the President, asking for reinforcements, has been received and carefully considered. The President is not willing to uncover the capital entirely, and believed that even if this were prudent it would require more time to effect a junction between your army and that of the Rappahannock, by way of the Potomac and York rivers, than by a land march. In order, therefore, to increase the strength of the attack upon Richmond at the earliest moment, Gen. McDowell has been ordered to march upon that city by the shortest route. He is ordered — keeping himself always in a position to cover the capital from all possible attack — so to operate as to put, his left wing in communication with your right, and you are instructed to co-operate so as to establish this communication as soon as possible, by extending your righ
lay of Major-General Banks to relieve the division of my command in the valley beyond the time I had calculated on, will prevent my joining you with the remainder of the troops I am to take below at as early as day as I named. My third division (McCall's) is now on the way. Please do me the favor to so place it that it may be in a position to join the others as they come down from Fredericksburg. Irwin McDowell., Major General Commanding. General McDowell to General McClellan. June 1rd time I am ordered to join you, and hope this time to get through. In view of the remarks made with reference to my leaving you and not joining you before by your friends, and of something I have heard as coming from you on that subject, I wish to say I go with the greatest satisfaction, and hope to arrive with my main body in time to be of service. McCall goes in advance by water. I will be with you in ten days with the remainder by Fredericksburg. Irwin McDowell, Major-Gen'l comd'g.
General. War Department, Washington,May 17, 1862. To Maj. Gen. McDowell, Commanding Department of the Rappahannock: General: Upon being joined by Shields's division, you will move upon Richmond by the general route of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad, co-operating with the forces under Gen. McClellan, now t army under my command and co-operate with yours in the reduction of Richmond, and also a copy of his instructions to you in relation to that co-operation. Major-Gen. Shields will join me to-day as soon as the necessary preparations for the march can be completed, which I think will be by the 24th instant. We shall set forward ius all back, and from Richmond north we shall have all our large masses paralyzed, and shall have to repeat what we have just accomplished. I have ordered Gen. Shields to commence a movement by tomorrow morning. A second division will follow in the afternoon. Did I understand you aright that you wished me in accompany t
J. R. Anderson (search for this): article 3
h the army under my command and co-operate with yours in the reduction of Richmond, and also a copy of his instructions to you in relation to that co-operation. Major-Gen. Shields will join me to-day as soon as the necessary preparations for the march can be completed, which I think will be by the 24th instant. We shall set forward in the general direction ordered. There is in front of us to impede our advance the secession army of the Rappahannock, so called, under the command of J. R. Anderson, of the Tredegar Iron Works. His force is from twelve to fifteen thousand men, mostly South Carolina and Georgia troops. We should engage this force on our first day's march, as they are within six or eight miles of us, posted on and to the right and left of the F. and R. railroad, and in a position of considerable strength. It is my purpose to turn their position by throwing a large force on their left flank, and cut off their opportunity of receiving any reinforcements from the dire
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