hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Butler 23 1 Browse Search
A. Lincoln 20 0 Browse Search
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
John J. Allen 10 2 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Taylor 10 0 Browse Search
John Kelly 8 0 Browse Search
Thos 8 0 Browse Search
John Staples 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 132 total hits in 65 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): article 14
the enemy has just reached here. God bless you, and all with you. Please tender to all, and accept for yourself, the nation's gratitude for your and their skill, endurance, and dauntless courage. "A. Lincoln." The Confederate success at Galveston. The Washington Chronicle announces the capture of the Harriet Lane and the surrender of the garrison at Galveston, Texas. It says: After a sharp fight, in which our troops defended themselves to the best of their ability, Magruder foGalveston, Texas. It says: After a sharp fight, in which our troops defended themselves to the best of their ability, Magruder forced them to surrender. Magruder was aided in his assault by five gunboats, protected with cotton, who simultaneously made an attack on our fleet. The rebel crew was composed of Texas riflemen, and after these had killed Captain Wamwright and most of the officers and crew of the Harriet lane, they boarded and took possession of her. The crew of the Union gunboat Westfield determined not to surrender her, and they blew her up. Commander Kenshaw and Lieut. Zimmerman did not get off the vessel in
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
been discharged without trial, there are yet there some four hundred. One or two hundred of these have arrived there within a few days past from Kentucky and Western Virginia. These men are taken from their homes, some from their beds at night, some from their homes in day time, and a great many of them are picked up in their fiepposed, and several other persons rushed in to part them, when the guards from the lookout above fired on them, killing an old man by the name of Jones, from Western Virginia, and a ball grazing the skull of another; he fell, and it was supposed at first he was killed also; another of the balls passed through a board at the head o he advises the Legislature to place on record their protest against the proclamation. The "State of Kanawha." The law for the erection of the new State of West Virginia was signed by Lincoln on the last day of the year; but by the terms of the bill it does not come immediately into the Union. After the Constitution recei
Franklin (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 14
t it is the forerunner of one that will apply to every officer of our armies if the proclamation threatened on the first of January is issued. The magnanimity of which Mr Seward assured the French Government would be observed by us toward the seceded States has grown small, by large degrees, under the fanaticism that demanded that the contest should not he a war, but a raid. The Horrors of a Northern prison Described by a Yankee paper — the sufferings of political prisoners. The Columbus (Ohio) Crisis, Gov. Mcdary's organ, which is a "conservative" paper, gives a description of the sufferings of those of its own party, as well as Southerners, who are arrested by Lincoln's minions as political prisoners. It says: We speak wholly of the political prison of the State, as we know nothing whatever of what occurs in the prisons where " rebels taken in arms" are kept — that is, the prisoners of war. It must not be forgotten that there have been from six to seven hundred p
Finn (Montana, United States) (search for this): article 14
an did not get off the vessel in time, and they were blown up with her. The other two gunboats escaped. Our loss is estimated at 150 killed and 200 taken prisoners. Later from New Orleans--Hon. Mr. Bouligny in prison. The Mobile Tribune has received a late New Orleans paper. From its summary of the news we take the following: Among the proceedings of the Provost Court we find the following item: "James Finland E. Bouligny had a row at J. Howkins's Bouligny shot three times at Finn, with whom he had been fighting, and who had knocked him down. None of the shots took effect. Both parties were arrested Finn was fined $25, and Bouligny was fined $100, and sent thirty days to the Parish prison." This is the same Bouligny who, at the time of the secession of Louisiana, was a representative in the Federal Congress from that State and who, born in the South, went over to her enemies. At the recent bogus election in New Orleans he was defeated for Congress by a man with
Columbia County (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 14
ng, and that has become filthy, worn out, and scarcely hangs upon their backs. They have no bedding, and are, therefore, compelled to sleep on the bare boards. They have not wood gh furnished them to keep fires up all night, and hence the suffering is intensified by the cold weather. If they attempt after night to walk out in the yard to take the chills off the dreary night, they are instantly threatened to be shot by the guards, as ordered by those in command. Dr. Allen, of Columbia county, Ohio, said he laid on a bare board until his hips were black and blue. The wood furnished them is four feet long, and they are compelled, mess to chop it up for themselves, and the provisions being furnished raw, they have to cook for themselves. Recollect, always, that these are political prisoners, against whom no one appears as accuse and no trial is permitted. The prison has become filthy — awfully so — and the rats are in droves. If the prisoners attempt to kill one of these
United States (United States) (search for this): article 14
fairs. Third.--The Cabinet should be exclusively composed of statesmen who are the cordial, resolute, unwavering supporters of the principles and purposes first above stated. Fourth.--It is unwise and unsafe to commit the direction, conduct, or of any important military operations, or separate general command or enterprise in this war to any one who is not a cordial believer and supporter of the same principles and purposes first above stated. The Republican Senators of the United States, entertaining the most unqualified confidence in the integrity and patriotism of the identified as they are with the success of his Administration profoundly impressed with the critical condition of national affairs; and deeply convinced that the public confidence requires a practical regard to the above propositions and principles, feel it their duty, from the positions they occupy, respectfully to present them for Executive consideration and action. The Kentucky (Union) Governor
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 14
t all, have erred in judgment. Their hearts are above treachery, and their faith has been proved in the presence of death — while Butler, impeached by the united testimony of the people of New Orleans; by the inhabitants of all that portion of Louisiana west of the Mississippi which he has plundered; by all the Fortian Consuls within his lines; by the report of Reverdy Johnson, an able and upright Commissioner of the Government, and by his own illegal and inhuman orders, in ordered from New Oro had knocked him down. None of the shots took effect. Both parties were arrested Finn was fined $25, and Bouligny was fined $100, and sent thirty days to the Parish prison." This is the same Bouligny who, at the time of the secession of Louisiana, was a representative in the Federal Congress from that State and who, born in the South, went over to her enemies. At the recent bogus election in New Orleans he was defeated for Congress by a man with whom he would have scorned to associate
this city two or three months ago, had put in an appearance on the streets of New Orleans. Quite a number of persons, among them the James Finn mentioned above, were arrested Christmas day for "using seditious language and annoying loyal persons by hurrahing for Jeff Davis, Stonewall Jackson, and other rebel leaders." Miscellaneous. The Yankee dispatches from Fort Monroe say the Federals burnt a rebel baggage train at the White House and captured $50,000 worth of goods from "Jim Brown of Baltimore," a blockade runner who is now a prisoner aboard the gunboat Hatasken. Col. Ludlow, the U. S. agent for the exchange of prisoners, telegraphs that it is "highly probable that the rebel Government will rescind the order retaining U. S. officers." Secretary Chase is in New York holding a conference with the bank Presidents. Gen. McClernand has superceded Gen. Sherman on account of the Vicksburg disaster to the latter. A. Malero, a bookseller in New Orleans, h
te a number of persons, among them the James Finn mentioned above, were arrested Christmas day for "using seditious language and annoying loyal persons by hurrahing for Jeff Davis, Stonewall Jackson, and other rebel leaders." Miscellaneous. The Yankee dispatches from Fort Monroe say the Federals burnt a rebel baggage train at the White House and captured $50,000 worth of goods from "Jim Brown of Baltimore," a blockade runner who is now a prisoner aboard the gunboat Hatasken. Col. Ludlow, the U. S. agent for the exchange of prisoners, telegraphs that it is "highly probable that the rebel Government will rescind the order retaining U. S. officers." Secretary Chase is in New York holding a conference with the bank Presidents. Gen. McClernand has superceded Gen. Sherman on account of the Vicksburg disaster to the latter. A. Malero, a bookseller in New Orleans, has been fined $25 for exhibiting a painting of Stonewall Jackson in his window. J. A. Mondelli, the
J. B. Forman (search for this): article 14
e runner who is now a prisoner aboard the gunboat Hatasken. Col. Ludlow, the U. S. agent for the exchange of prisoners, telegraphs that it is "highly probable that the rebel Government will rescind the order retaining U. S. officers." Secretary Chase is in New York holding a conference with the bank Presidents. Gen. McClernand has superceded Gen. Sherman on account of the Vicksburg disaster to the latter. A. Malero, a bookseller in New Orleans, has been fined $25 for exhibiting a painting of Stonewall Jackson in his window. J. A. Mondelli, the artist who painted it, was fined $10. The Washington Republican states authoritatively that 40 vessels have recently left British ports to run the blockade. Col. J. B. Forman, 20 years of age, the youngest Colonel in the federal service, was killed at Murfreesboro'. It is now certain that Burnside will retire from the command of the army of the Potomac. He insists upon it himself. Hooker will succeed him.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...