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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): article 5
The opening of the session of the French Corps Legislatif. The Paris correspondent of the Chicago Times gives an interesting description of the scenes at the recent opening of the session of the Corps Legislatif of France, which was attended with much pomp and show of imperial grandeur. He says: All the persons who received cards of invitation were required to be present before a quarter past 12 o'clock, when the doors were closed. The hall in which the ceremony took place was hung with crimson velvet, and all the seats were covered with the same material. At the upper end was an estrade, on which was placed the Emperor's throne, over which was a canopy of crimson velvet, decorated with glided eagles. Along the middle of the hall was a wide passage for the imperial cortege, and on each side were seats for the members of the Senate and Legislative body.--Close to the throne on each side were the great officers of State, ministers, cardinals, marshals, and admirals. Near
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 5
was most imposing. The Emperor wore a General's uniform, the Princes also being in military costume. The Empress's dress was almost entirely covered with a magnificent bournous of gold tissue, (a recent gift from a distinguished manufacturer of Lyons) with a wavy fringe of glittering gold thread, and hemmed with three heavy gold tassels at the back. Her hat was of while crape, with white feathers. The Princess Clothilde wore a blue sating dress, of the color which is called here blue Mexico, (a mere suspicion lighter than what has been called Marie Louise,) with an Indian shawl with very large design upon it, her hat being also of white crape, with blue feathers the same shade as the dress. The Princess Mathilde's dress was of purple velvet; she wore a black lace shawl and white crape hat with a plume the color of the dress. The Princess Anna Murat wore a white silk dress, with light blue flounces and sash, and, being noted for her fine figure, came in without any drapery, ha
vely discourse interchanged; even grave counselors of State and solemn-looking masters of ceremonies were not relentlessly rigid, and found places for their favorites which strict etiquette did not grant to them, and for which the recipients of these distinguished favors were doubtless proportionately grateful. After the conclusion of the Emperor's speech, oaths were administered to the Senators and Deputies, who had been nominated since the last session. The Minister of State (Count Walewski) then declared that the session of 1863 was open, and requested the members of the two Chambers to assemble the next day in their respective places of sitting for the dispatch of business. Their Majesties them withdrew in the same order as they had arrived, and a second salute of artillery announced that the ceremony had terminated. On the same day a grand dinner was given at the Tulleries, at which 42 persons were present — the members of the Imperial family, and the officers
Anna Murat (search for this): article 5
hat was of while crape, with white feathers. The Princess Clothilde wore a blue sating dress, of the color which is called here blue Mexico, (a mere suspicion lighter than what has been called Marie Louise,) with an Indian shawl with very large design upon it, her hat being also of white crape, with blue feathers the same shade as the dress. The Princess Mathilde's dress was of purple velvet; she wore a black lace shawl and white crape hat with a plume the color of the dress. The Princess Anna Murat wore a white silk dress, with light blue flounces and sash, and, being noted for her fine figure, came in without any drapery, having left her shawl in her carriage. Her hat was of white crape, with pink roses inside and outside. Before the arrival of the august personages who gave solemnity to the assemblage, there was, as is usual where there are "fair women and brave men" met together, a great deal of gallantry and lively discourse interchanged; even grave counselors of Sta
all was a wide passage for the imperial cortege, and on each side were seats for the members of the Senate and Legislative body.--Close to the throne on each side were the great officers of State, ministers, cardinals, marshals, and admirals. Near the steps of the estrade were the members of the Privy Council, grand officers of the Legion of Honor, and other distinguished personages. Opposite the throne was the gallery, occupied by deputations from the various civil courts, the Prefects of Paris, and superior officers of the various military corps. Just over the throne the diplomatic corps had their places, and the galleries on each side were filled with ladies. A little before 1 o'clock a master of ceremonies announced. "The Empress," and the whole assembly rose. Her Majesty and the Prince Imperial entered, preceded and followed by the great officers and ladies of the household, and were received with cries of " Vive l' Imperatrics!" " Vive is Princes Imperial!" Her Majesty
Lucien Bonaparte (search for this): article 5
numerous suite. His Majesty was accompanied also by the Princes of the imperial family, (or, as La Patric, which delights in the grandiose, expresses it, by the Princes of the blood,) and was received with the same enthusiasm which was testified on the entry of the Empress — cries of " Vive l'empereur!" continuing until he had taken his seat upon the throne. On the right hand of his Majesty was seated Prince Napoleon, and next were placed the Princes Murat and Prince Charles and Prince Lucien Bonaparte. The Grand Master then requested all to be seated and the Emperor, rising, delivered his address in a very clear and distinct voice. All of the gentlemen were in uniform, and the ladies were in full dress visiting toilette, and the general effect was most imposing. The Emperor wore a General's uniform, the Princes also being in military costume. The Empress's dress was almost entirely covered with a magnificent bournous of gold tissue, (a recent gift from a distinguished man
Marie Louise (search for this): article 5
rinces also being in military costume. The Empress's dress was almost entirely covered with a magnificent bournous of gold tissue, (a recent gift from a distinguished manufacturer of Lyons) with a wavy fringe of glittering gold thread, and hemmed with three heavy gold tassels at the back. Her hat was of while crape, with white feathers. The Princess Clothilde wore a blue sating dress, of the color which is called here blue Mexico, (a mere suspicion lighter than what has been called Marie Louise,) with an Indian shawl with very large design upon it, her hat being also of white crape, with blue feathers the same shade as the dress. The Princess Mathilde's dress was of purple velvet; she wore a black lace shawl and white crape hat with a plume the color of the dress. The Princess Anna Murat wore a white silk dress, with light blue flounces and sash, and, being noted for her fine figure, came in without any drapery, having left her shawl in her carriage. Her hat was of white crap
The Grand Master then requested all to be seated and the Emperor, rising, delivered his address in a very clear and distinct voice. All of the gentlemen were in uniform, and the ladies were in full dress visiting toilette, and the general effect was most imposing. The Emperor wore a General's uniform, the Princes also being in military costume. The Empress's dress was almost entirely covered with a magnificent bournous of gold tissue, (a recent gift from a distinguished manufacturer of Lyons) with a wavy fringe of glittering gold thread, and hemmed with three heavy gold tassels at the back. Her hat was of while crape, with white feathers. The Princess Clothilde wore a blue sating dress, of the color which is called here blue Mexico, (a mere suspicion lighter than what has been called Marie Louise,) with an Indian shawl with very large design upon it, her hat being also of white crape, with blue feathers the same shade as the dress. The Princess Mathilde's dress was of pur
elors of State and solemn-looking masters of ceremonies were not relentlessly rigid, and found places for their favorites which strict etiquette did not grant to them, and for which the recipients of these distinguished favors were doubtless proportionately grateful. After the conclusion of the Emperor's speech, oaths were administered to the Senators and Deputies, who had been nominated since the last session. The Minister of State (Count Walewski) then declared that the session of 1863 was open, and requested the members of the two Chambers to assemble the next day in their respective places of sitting for the dispatch of business. Their Majesties them withdrew in the same order as they had arrived, and a second salute of artillery announced that the ceremony had terminated. On the same day a grand dinner was given at the Tulleries, at which 42 persons were present — the members of the Imperial family, and the officers of the Cent Gardes who had served as escort i