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United States (United States) (search for this): article 9
subject to the civil authority, and by proper legislation give it a practical meaning by providing for its maintenance at all hazards. It is but just to add that this accusation does not apply indiscriminately to all the regiments that have been quartered in Kentucky. The commanders of many of them oppose the practice so far as they can do so consistently with what they believe to be their duty as subject to the rules and articles of war and the proclamation of the President of the United States, issued on the 22d of September last. Lincoln's emancipation proclamation. As an operative edict in the Southern rebellious States, it can have no other effect than to strengthen them in their rebellion, and give a tolerable pretext to their cause. He might with as much reason have issued a proclamation to them to lay down their arms. Both equally expose him to a contemptuous rejection of his scheme. But he makes a distinction between slavery in the rebel States and slave
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): article 9
act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity." If military necessity is not to be measured by constitutional limits we are no longer a free people. The sword has become paramount, and the civil authority subordinate.--The monstrous doctrine has already received an indignant rebuke from the people themselves. The great States of New York, Ohio, Indians, New Jersey, and Illinois in their recent elections have put their veto upon it; and later returns indicate that Connecticut and other paris of New England will soon add their emphatic condemnation. Indeed, it is apparent that the people are aroused to the sense of the danger that threatens their constitutional liberties, and will, in good time, come to the rescue. Until that day — which is unquestionably near at hand — arrives, it becomes Kentucky to maintain the position she has hitherto occupied.--Let her not abate one lot or little of her opposition to Succession or Abolition; but let her poise herself up
New England (United States) (search for this): article 9
e Constitution upon military necessity." If military necessity is not to be measured by constitutional limits we are no longer a free people. The sword has become paramount, and the civil authority subordinate.--The monstrous doctrine has already received an indignant rebuke from the people themselves. The great States of New York, Ohio, Indians, New Jersey, and Illinois in their recent elections have put their veto upon it; and later returns indicate that Connecticut and other paris of New England will soon add their emphatic condemnation. Indeed, it is apparent that the people are aroused to the sense of the danger that threatens their constitutional liberties, and will, in good time, come to the rescue. Until that day — which is unquestionably near at hand — arrives, it becomes Kentucky to maintain the position she has hitherto occupied.--Let her not abate one lot or little of her opposition to Succession or Abolition; but let her poise herself upon the great truth that man is
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 9
rs of the Government upon the specious pretext that the President "sincerely believes it to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity." If military necessity is not to be measured by constitutional limits we are no longer a free people. The sword has become paramount, and the civil authority subordinate.--The monstrous doctrine has already received an indignant rebuke from the people themselves. The great States of New York, Ohio, Indians, New Jersey, and Illinois in their recent elections have put their veto upon it; and later returns indicate that Connecticut and other paris of New England will soon add their emphatic condemnation. Indeed, it is apparent that the people are aroused to the sense of the danger that threatens their constitutional liberties, and will, in good time, come to the rescue. Until that day — which is unquestionably near at hand — arrives, it becomes Kentucky to maintain the position she has hitherto occupied.--Let her not a
ursued, and the aid she has rendered to the national Government. He approves of the grant made by Congress for the establishment of agricultural colleges, and recommends the Legislature to take steps to comply with the conditions of the grant. The second half of the message is devoted to the slavery question, in relation to the President's proclamation of emancipation. It is from this portion that we make the following extracts, showing what that unhappy State has suffered at the hands of Yankee "friends." What She has a right to complain of. She has a right to complain that her neutrality has been denounced in the Halls of Congress as either treasonable or cowardly or both. This is a most unkind return to those patriotic and loyal men, who, perfectly understanding the difficulties in their path, adopted the only line of policy that could stem the tide of Southern sympathy, and in so doing keep safely to her moorings a great State which, if it had been lost to the Union, wo
assistance of any outside administration of her affairs, she claims the privilege of originating the suggestion. I would, therefore suggest the propriety of your passing a resolution, by way of response to the President's proposition, that Kentucky rejects it; and at the same time, in behalf of her own unquestioned rights as an independent power in the control of her own State polity protests against any interference with it as unwarranted by the Constitution of the United States. A Dim Ray of light for the Future. But by far the most alarming aspect in which the proclamation presents itself is its usurpations of the powers of the Government upon the specious pretext that the President "sincerely believes it to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity." If military necessity is not to be measured by constitutional limits we are no longer a free people. The sword has become paramount, and the civil authority subordinate.--The monstrous doct
ion give it a practical meaning by providing for its maintenance at all hazards. It is but just to add that this accusation does not apply indiscriminately to all the regiments that have been quartered in Kentucky. The commanders of many of them oppose the practice so far as they can do so consistently with what they believe to be their duty as subject to the rules and articles of war and the proclamation of the President of the United States, issued on the 22d of September last. Lincoln's emancipation proclamation. As an operative edict in the Southern rebellious States, it can have no other effect than to strengthen them in their rebellion, and give a tolerable pretext to their cause. He might with as much reason have issued a proclamation to them to lay down their arms. Both equally expose him to a contemptuous rejection of his scheme. But he makes a distinction between slavery in the rebel States and slavery in the loyal States, and proposes to the latter com
Message of the (Union) Governor of Kentucky. We have received a copy of the message of Gov. Robinson the Union Governor of Kentucky. The first part is devoted to a brief review of the origin of the rebellion, the course Kentucky has pursued, and the aid she has rendered to the national Government. He approves of the grant made by Congress for the establishment of agricultural colleges, and recommends the Legislature to take steps to comply with the conditions of the grant. The second half of the message is devoted to the slavery question, in relation to the President's proclamation of emancipation. It is from this portion that we make the following extracts, showing what that unhappy State has suffered at the hands of Yankee "friends." What She has a right to complain of. She has a right to complain that her neutrality has been denounced in the Halls of Congress as either treasonable or cowardly or both. This is a most unkind return to those patriotic and loyal men,
s usurpations of the powers of the Government upon the specious pretext that the President "sincerely believes it to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity." If military necessity is not to be measured by constitutional limits we are no longer a free people. The sword has become paramount, and the civil authority subordinate.--The monstrous doctrine has already received an indignant rebuke from the people themselves. The great States of New York, Ohio, Indians, New Jersey, and Illinois in their recent elections have put their veto upon it; and later returns indicate that Connecticut and other paris of New England will soon add their emphatic condemnation. Indeed, it is apparent that the people are aroused to the sense of the danger that threatens their constitutional liberties, and will, in good time, come to the rescue. Until that day — which is unquestionably near at hand — arrives, it becomes Kentucky to maintain the position she has hithert
September 22nd (search for this): article 9
, and by proper legislation give it a practical meaning by providing for its maintenance at all hazards. It is but just to add that this accusation does not apply indiscriminately to all the regiments that have been quartered in Kentucky. The commanders of many of them oppose the practice so far as they can do so consistently with what they believe to be their duty as subject to the rules and articles of war and the proclamation of the President of the United States, issued on the 22d of September last. Lincoln's emancipation proclamation. As an operative edict in the Southern rebellious States, it can have no other effect than to strengthen them in their rebellion, and give a tolerable pretext to their cause. He might with as much reason have issued a proclamation to them to lay down their arms. Both equally expose him to a contemptuous rejection of his scheme. But he makes a distinction between slavery in the rebel States and slavery in the loyal States, and pro