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Oshawa (Canada) (search for this): article 1
e on the deck of the Montauk with glass in hand, and presented the long wished for target. A Maynard rifle slug soon went whizzing by his ears, which startled and caused him to right about, when a second slug apparently took effect on his person, as with both hands raised he caught hold of the turret for support, and immediately clambered or was dragged in at a port hole. It is believed that the officer was killed. The display of awning on the Montauk the day following, and the funeral on Oshawa, Friday, give strength to the opinion. As soon as this shot was fired, the Montauk turned her guns upon the marsh and literally raked it with grapeshot. The riflemen, however, succeeded in changing their base in time and avoiding the missiles of the enemy. Not one of them was hurt. Too much credit cannot be bestowed on this daring act of a few brave men. The damage done to the garrison was confined to the wounding of one man in the knee, and another slightly in the face. Conside
Ogeechee (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The assault on Fort McAllister--iron-clads and Forts. Fort McAllister has been made the object of seven attacks from the Federal fleet. That the reader may better understand the position of affairs, we would state that Fort McAllister is situated on the right bank of the Ogeechee, and occupies the farthest point of mainland jutting out into the march. The river flows straight from a point about a mile above the fort to a distance of about a mile and a half below, where it makes a bend and runs almost south and behind a point of wood, thence onward to Oshawa Sound and the ocean. During the afternoon of Monday three iron Monitors — the Montauk, the second supposed, from the descriptions in the New York papers, to be the Passaic, and the third the Weehawken — steamed up from behind the point of wood, rounded the bend, and came up to within a short distance of the fort, the Montauk about 1,000 yards off, and the other two in the rear, some hundred and fifty yards from each other.
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The assault on Fort McAllister--iron-clads and Forts. Fort McAllister has been made the object of seven attacks from the Federal fleet. That the reader may better understand the position of affairs, we would state that Fort McAllister is situFort McAllister has been made the object of seven attacks from the Federal fleet. That the reader may better understand the position of affairs, we would state that Fort McAllister is situated on the right bank of the Ogeechee, and occupies the farthest point of mainland jutting out into the march. The river flows straight from a point about a mile above the fort to a distance of about a mile and a half below, where it makes a bend Fort McAllister is situated on the right bank of the Ogeechee, and occupies the farthest point of mainland jutting out into the march. The river flows straight from a point about a mile above the fort to a distance of about a mile and a half below, where it makes a bend and runs almost south and behind a point of wood, thence onward to Oshawa Sound and the ocean. During the afternoon of Monday three iron Monitors — the Montauk, the second supposed, from the descriptions in the New York papers, to be the Passaic, a inches in length, screaming along their destructive way like to many fiery demons, plunging into the earthwork's of Fort McAllister to the depth of eight or ten feet, or exploding with a voice of thunder and the jar of an earthquake, for more than
McAllister (search for this): article 1
schooners and an old steamer, which also took part in the fight and kept up a rapid fire throughout.--Such was the force and disposition of the enemy. The Montauk and another iron-clad were armed with one 15 inch and one 11-inch gun each, and the third with 8 inch rifle guns. The mortar boats threw 10 and 13 inch shells. Our battery remained us in the former fight, except that it had been reinforced with a 10 inch columbiad. Another part of our force was a detachment of rifles, Capt. McAllister, under command of 3d Lieut. B. A. Flatbee. These men went up the river and crossed over the marsh by night to a point about two hundred and fifty yards from the Montauk, and in full rifle range, where they dug out a rifle pit in the mud, and remained the greater part of the fight, it is believed, not without important success, as will be seen hereafter. Thus stood matters up to a quarter to nine o'clock Tuesday morning, when our troops, wearied with waiting on the enemy, opened on
B. A. Flatbee (search for this): article 1
so took part in the fight and kept up a rapid fire throughout.--Such was the force and disposition of the enemy. The Montauk and another iron-clad were armed with one 15 inch and one 11-inch gun each, and the third with 8 inch rifle guns. The mortar boats threw 10 and 13 inch shells. Our battery remained us in the former fight, except that it had been reinforced with a 10 inch columbiad. Another part of our force was a detachment of rifles, Capt. McAllister, under command of 3d Lieut. B. A. Flatbee. These men went up the river and crossed over the marsh by night to a point about two hundred and fifty yards from the Montauk, and in full rifle range, where they dug out a rifle pit in the mud, and remained the greater part of the fight, it is believed, not without important success, as will be seen hereafter. Thus stood matters up to a quarter to nine o'clock Tuesday morning, when our troops, wearied with waiting on the enemy, opened on the Montauk with the rifle gun. The 8
f sharpshooters volunteered to make the necessary repairs. Though under fire these brave men continued their work throughout the night, and at daylight the dismounted columbiad was again in position, all the breaches repaired, and the fort in complete order for another trial of strength with her formidable antagonists. At dawn the men were again at their guns; but hour after hour passed and no enemy hove in sight. The Yankees had received their fill, and concluded to let us alone. Lt. Elarben and his little band had taken their position under cover of the marsh, within rifle shot of the enemy's rams. It was one of extreme peril, being not only exposed to a raking fire from the gunboats should they be discovered, but also in a direct line with the fire from the fort. During the fight an officer made his appearance on the deck of the Montauk with glass in hand, and presented the long wished for target. A Maynard rifle slug soon went whizzing by his ears, which startled and ca
that her pilot house was taken down and the men were at work on her during the whole of that night and the day following. Thus ended the fight with the exception of a slow but continued fire, which was kept up from the mortar boats from behind the point of wood throughout the night, in order to prevent repairs on the fort. If, however, did little or no damage, nor did it cause a suspension of the work for a moment. The garrison being pretty well worn out by the labors of the day. Major Schnaff's battalion of sharpshooters volunteered to make the necessary repairs. Though under fire these brave men continued their work throughout the night, and at daylight the dismounted columbiad was again in position, all the breaches repaired, and the fort in complete order for another trial of strength with her formidable antagonists. At dawn the men were again at their guns; but hour after hour passed and no enemy hove in sight. The Yankees had received their fill, and concluded to let