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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Harrisonburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
Crops — impressments — Military Affairs in the Valley — the severe winter — Court days. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Harrisonburg, Va., March 16, 1863. From the severity of the past winter we are led to conclude that the season for all crops will be a very favorable one. It is true, not much wheat was put in the ground lest fall, owing to the long continued dry weather; but what there was planted will undoubtedly produce largely, giving nearly as much as usual. But what we will lack in wheat will be more than made up in the larger quantity of corn. The farmers are preparing, in the Valley generally I believe, for planting as much corn as possibly can be attended to. Some of our oldest citizens and most experienced farmers say that they have never known it to fail that good crops would follow a snowy winter. If there is any virtue in snow then we have been greatly blessed, for we have had twenty one so far and it may be we shall have more, as we have not pa
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
disturbs the monotony and quiet of Gen. Jones's camp Gen. Jones and Gen. Milroy seem to hold the same card, and consequently the game is blocked. Milroy wants Jones to come to Winchester, and vise versa. The atrocities perpetrated by Milroy are bearing hard upon the spirits of the good and loyal people of Winchester and of the surrounding counties.--It would be a very happy thing if the authorities would send "Stonewall" to the deliverance of these people. There is a negro regiment at Harper's Ferry, and a negro Captain, with his company, was in Charlestown, Jefferson county, a few days ago, searching the houses of white people, probably hunting "secesh" flag, guns, etc. This is the crowning act of infamy of the Lincoln Administration. The past winter has been a very severe one, and one which I presume will long he remembered for its many snows and severity, and the suffering which has necessarily ensued. Nothing short of an implicit faith in the great King of the Universe cou
Paul Jones (search for this): article 2
ntities. Let it be tried, at least. There is nothing of interest in the department of the Valley, commanded by Brig.-Gen. Jones. --A small skirmish now and then disturbs the monotony and quiet of Gen. Jones's camp Gen. Jones and Gen. Milroy seeGen. Jones's camp Gen. Jones and Gen. Milroy seem to hold the same card, and consequently the game is blocked. Milroy wants Jones to come to Winchester, and vise versa. The atrocities perpetrated by Milroy are bearing hard upon the spirits of the good and loyal people of Winchester and of the surGen. Jones and Gen. Milroy seem to hold the same card, and consequently the game is blocked. Milroy wants Jones to come to Winchester, and vise versa. The atrocities perpetrated by Milroy are bearing hard upon the spirits of the good and loyal people of Winchester and of the surrounding counties.--It would be a very happy thing if the authorities would send "Stonewall" to the deliverance of these people. There is a negro regiment at Harper's Ferry, and a negro Captain, with his company, was in Charlestown, Jefferson countyJones to come to Winchester, and vise versa. The atrocities perpetrated by Milroy are bearing hard upon the spirits of the good and loyal people of Winchester and of the surrounding counties.--It would be a very happy thing if the authorities would send "Stonewall" to the deliverance of these people. There is a negro regiment at Harper's Ferry, and a negro Captain, with his company, was in Charlestown, Jefferson county, a few days ago, searching the houses of white people, probably hunting "secesh" flag, guns, etc. This is the crowning act of infamy of the Lincoln Administration. The past winter has been a very severe one, and one which I presume will long h
the department of the Valley, commanded by Brig.-Gen. Jones. --A small skirmish now and then disturbs the monotony and quiet of Gen. Jones's camp Gen. Jones and Gen. Milroy seem to hold the same card, and consequently the game is blocked. Milroy wants Jones to come to Winchester, and vise versa. The atrocities perpetrated by MilroMilroy wants Jones to come to Winchester, and vise versa. The atrocities perpetrated by Milroy are bearing hard upon the spirits of the good and loyal people of Winchester and of the surrounding counties.--It would be a very happy thing if the authorities would send "Stonewall" to the deliverance of these people. There is a negro regiment at Harper's Ferry, and a negro Captain, with his company, was in Charlestown, JeffeMilroy are bearing hard upon the spirits of the good and loyal people of Winchester and of the surrounding counties.--It would be a very happy thing if the authorities would send "Stonewall" to the deliverance of these people. There is a negro regiment at Harper's Ferry, and a negro Captain, with his company, was in Charlestown, Jefferson county, a few days ago, searching the houses of white people, probably hunting "secesh" flag, guns, etc. This is the crowning act of infamy of the Lincoln Administration. The past winter has been a very severe one, and one which I presume will long he remembered for its many snows and severity, and the suffering which ha
Stonewall (search for this): article 2
t of the Valley, commanded by Brig.-Gen. Jones. --A small skirmish now and then disturbs the monotony and quiet of Gen. Jones's camp Gen. Jones and Gen. Milroy seem to hold the same card, and consequently the game is blocked. Milroy wants Jones to come to Winchester, and vise versa. The atrocities perpetrated by Milroy are bearing hard upon the spirits of the good and loyal people of Winchester and of the surrounding counties.--It would be a very happy thing if the authorities would send "Stonewall" to the deliverance of these people. There is a negro regiment at Harper's Ferry, and a negro Captain, with his company, was in Charlestown, Jefferson county, a few days ago, searching the houses of white people, probably hunting "secesh" flag, guns, etc. This is the crowning act of infamy of the Lincoln Administration. The past winter has been a very severe one, and one which I presume will long he remembered for its many snows and severity, and the suffering which has necessarily e
March 16th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 2
Crops — impressments — Military Affairs in the Valley — the severe winter — Court days. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Harrisonburg, Va., March 16, 1863. From the severity of the past winter we are led to conclude that the season for all crops will be a very favorable one. It is true, not much wheat was put in the ground lest fall, owing to the long continued dry weather; but what there was planted will undoubtedly produce largely, giving nearly as much as usual. But what we will lack in wheat will be more than made up in the larger quantity of corn. The farmers are preparing, in the Valley generally I believe, for planting as much corn as possibly can be attended to. Some of our oldest citizens and most experienced farmers say that they have never known it to fail that good crops would follow a snowy winter. If there is any virtue in snow then we have been greatly blessed, for we have had twenty one so far and it may be we shall have more, as we have not pas