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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 31, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): article 2
w York Herald of the 27th, gives the following summery of the news by the Etna, which left Liverpool on the 12th instant: We believe that the question of French intervention in our affairs has received a quietus in a dispatch recently issued by M Drouyn de L'Huys to the Minister of the French Governments at Washington, which comprises an answer to Mr. Seward's memorable note of the 6th ult. The spirit of the dispatch forwarded by M. Drouyn de L'Huys involves a withdrawal on the part of France from all further offer of mediation — a course which she has adopted with regret — and assumes henceforth the part of a simple spectator in the contest confining herself to following merely the course of events. At the same time the Cabinet of Louis Napoleon expresses its sorrow that its suggestions, as expressed in its counsels on the 9th of January, were not more fully comprehended by Mr. Seward; but it declares that its opinions remain uncharged, notwithstanding the arguments of our Secr
M. Drouyn (search for this): article 2
The intervention question. The New York Herald of the 27th, gives the following summery of the news by the Etna, which left Liverpool on the 12th instant: We believe that the question of French intervention in our affairs has received a quietus in a dispatch recently issued by M Drouyn de L'Huys to the Minister of the French Governments at Washington, which comprises an answer to Mr. Seward's memorable note of the 6th ult. The spirit of the dispatch forwarded by M. Drouyn de L'Huys involves a withdrawal on the part of France from all further offer of mediation — a course which she has adopted with regret — and assumes henceforth the part of a simple spectator in the contest confining herself to following merely the course of events. At the same time the Cabinet of Louis Napoleon expresses its sorrow that its suggestions, as expressed in its counsels on the 9th of January, were not more fully comprehended by Mr. Seward; but it declares that its opinions remain uncharged, no
h instant: We believe that the question of French intervention in our affairs has received a quietus in a dispatch recently issued by M Drouyn de L'Huys to the Minister of the French Governments at Washington, which comprises an answer to Mr. Seward's memorable note of the 6th ult. The spirit of the dispatch forwarded by M. Drouyn de L'Huys involves a withdrawal on the part of France from all further offer of mediation — a course which she has adopted with regret — and assumes henceforth tntest confining herself to following merely the course of events. At the same time the Cabinet of Louis Napoleon expresses its sorrow that its suggestions, as expressed in its counsels on the 9th of January, were not more fully comprehended by Mr. Seward; but it declares that its opinions remain uncharged, notwithstanding the arguments of our Secretary of State. The idea of French intervention may there are be considered as an end, unless the "course of events" should again call it into life.
Drouyn De L'Huys (search for this): article 2
The intervention question. The New York Herald of the 27th, gives the following summery of the news by the Etna, which left Liverpool on the 12th instant: We believe that the question of French intervention in our affairs has received a quietus in a dispatch recently issued by M Drouyn de L'Huys to the Minister of the French Governments at Washington, which comprises an answer to Mr. Seward's memorable note of the 6th ult. The spirit of the dispatch forwarded by M. Drouyn de L'Huys involves a withdrawal on the part of France from all further offer of mediation — a course which she has adopted with regret — and assumes henceforth the part of a simple spectator in the contest confining herself to following merely the course of events. At the same time the Cabinet of Louis Napoleon expresses its sorrow that its suggestions, as expressed in its counsels on the 9th of January, were not more fully comprehended by Mr. Seward; but it declares that its opinions remain uncharged, not
Louis Napoleon (search for this): article 2
uyn de L'Huys to the Minister of the French Governments at Washington, which comprises an answer to Mr. Seward's memorable note of the 6th ult. The spirit of the dispatch forwarded by M. Drouyn de L'Huys involves a withdrawal on the part of France from all further offer of mediation — a course which she has adopted with regret — and assumes henceforth the part of a simple spectator in the contest confining herself to following merely the course of events. At the same time the Cabinet of Louis Napoleon expresses its sorrow that its suggestions, as expressed in its counsels on the 9th of January, were not more fully comprehended by Mr. Seward; but it declares that its opinions remain uncharged, notwithstanding the arguments of our Secretary of State. The idea of French intervention may there are be considered as an end, unless the "course of events" should again call it into life. The London Times speculates in an editorial, on the probability that a strong Democratic party will b
The intervention question. The New York Herald of the 27th, gives the following summery of the news by the Etna, which left Liverpool on the 12th instant: We believe that the question of French intervention in our affairs has received a quietus in a dispatch recently issued by M Drouyn de L'Huys to the Minister of the French Governments at Washington, which comprises an answer to Mr. Seward's memorable note of the 6th ult. The spirit of the dispatch forwarded by M. Drouyn de L'Huys involves a withdrawal on the part of France from all further offer of mediation — a course which she has adopted with regret — and assumes henceforth the part of a simple spectator in the contest confining herself to following merely the course of events. At the same time the Cabinet of Louis Napoleon expresses its sorrow that its suggestions, as expressed in its counsels on the 9th of January, were not more fully comprehended by Mr. Seward; but it declares that its opinions remain uncharged, not
September, 1 AD (search for this): article 2
r to Mr. Seward's memorable note of the 6th ult. The spirit of the dispatch forwarded by M. Drouyn de L'Huys involves a withdrawal on the part of France from all further offer of mediation — a course which she has adopted with regret — and assumes henceforth the part of a simple spectator in the contest confining herself to following merely the course of events. At the same time the Cabinet of Louis Napoleon expresses its sorrow that its suggestions, as expressed in its counsels on the 9th of January, were not more fully comprehended by Mr. Seward; but it declares that its opinions remain uncharged, notwithstanding the arguments of our Secretary of State. The idea of French intervention may there are be considered as an end, unless the "course of events" should again call it into life. The London Times speculates in an editorial, on the probability that a strong Democratic party will be organized in the Northern States of America, on the basis of making an offer of peace to the
The intervention question. The New York Herald of the 27th, gives the following summery of the news by the Etna, which left Liverpool on the 12th instant: We believe that the question of French intervention in our affairs has received a quietus in a dispatch recently issued by M Drouyn de L'Huys to the Minister of the French Governments at Washington, which comprises an answer to Mr. Seward's memorable note of the 6th ult. The spirit of the dispatch forwarded by M. Drouyn de L'Huys involves a withdrawal on the part of France from all further offer of mediation — a course which she has adopted with regret — and assumes henceforth the part of a simple spectator in the contest confining herself to following merely the course of events. At the same time the Cabinet of Louis Napoleon expresses its sorrow that its suggestions, as expressed in its counsels on the 9th of January, were not more fully comprehended by Mr. Seward; but it declares that its opinions remain uncharged, not