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Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 6
From Nassau --A Colored Demonstration--A letter from Nassau, the 18th, to the Charleston Courtier, announces the sale arrival of the blockade-running steamer Ruby at Havana. The Ruby was obliged to put into Matanzas during heavy weather. The letter says: While there the Federal cruiser Sonora came in and anchored so near her that there was scarcely room for the two vessels to swing clear of each other. Capt Pest being determined to test the intentions of his neighbor, threw some shavings, &c., into his furnace, and made a smoke, whereupon the Federal got up steam, beat his men to quarters, and ran out his guns. Capt. Peat applied to the Spanish Admiral for protection, and was actuated that he should not be molested while he was within Spanish jurisdiction. The British war steamer Ariadne, just then arriving, took charge of the Ruby, and in broad daylight col. vowed her to Havana. The affair created much indignation among the British and Spaniards, and much impotent wr
Matanzas (Cuba) (search for this): article 6
From Nassau --A Colored Demonstration--A letter from Nassau, the 18th, to the Charleston Courtier, announces the sale arrival of the blockade-running steamer Ruby at Havana. The Ruby was obliged to put into Matanzas during heavy weather. The letter says: While there the Federal cruiser Sonora came in and anchored so near her that there was scarcely room for the two vessels to swing clear of each other. Capt Pest being determined to test the intentions of his neighbor, threw some shavings, &c., into his furnace, and made a smoke, whereupon the Federal got up steam, beat his men to quarters, and ran out his guns. Capt. Peat applied to the Spanish Admiral for protection, and was actuated that he should not be molested while he was within Spanish jurisdiction. The British war steamer Ariadne, just then arriving, took charge of the Ruby, and in broad daylight col. vowed her to Havana. The affair created much indignation among the British and Spaniards, and much impotent wr
Havana (Cuba) (search for this): article 6
o the Spanish Admiral for protection, and was actuated that he should not be molested while he was within Spanish jurisdiction. The British war steamer Ariadne, just then arriving, took charge of the Ruby, and in broad daylight col. vowed her to Havana. The affair created much indignation among the British and Spaniards, and much impotent wrath among the Yankees in Mataunas. I am informed that the Captain of the Arleane called on Admiral Wilkes, in Havans, and told him he would sink any Federal cruiser that should molest a English merchant steamer in neutral waters. On the 15th inst, the Yankee steamship Vanderbilt, Rear Admiral Wilker, from Havana, steamed up to Nassau and sent a boat ashore with dispatches for the Yankee Consul. The most ludicrous scene took place on the arrival of the small boat at one of the wharves. The fences and cotton bales around were covered with a swarm of Nassau negroes, who received the Yankees with and Black committee the faces of the crew, w
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 6
From Nassau --A Colored Demonstration--A letter from Nassau, the 18th, to the Charleston Courtier, announces the sale arrival of the blockade-running steamer Ruby at Havana. The Ruby was obliged to put into Matanzas during heavy weather. The letter says: While there the Federal cruiser Sonora came in and anchored so hould molest a English merchant steamer in neutral waters. On the 15th inst, the Yankee steamship Vanderbilt, Rear Admiral Wilker, from Havana, steamed up to Nassau and sent a boat ashore with dispatches for the Yankee Consul. The most ludicrous scene took place on the arrival of the small boat at one of the wharves. The fences and cotton bales around were covered with a swarm of Nassau negroes, who received the Yankees with and Black committee the faces of the crew, while the officer in command was evidently nervous and nonplussed — During the stay of the boat at the wharf, the darkles indulged in such cynical reflections as these: "Golly, how d
took place on the arrival of the small boat at one of the wharves. The fences and cotton bales around were covered with a swarm of Nassau negroes, who received the Yankees with and Black committee the faces of the crew, while the officer in command was evidently nervous and nonplussed — During the stay of the boat at the wharf, the darkles indulged in such cynical reflections as these: "Golly, how dey'd put out if de 290 was in sight." "I wonder if day's heard from Charleston?" "If Cap'n Maffit was here hold sick dom in two minutes" A big negro on a cotton bale, surrounded by his tatlelitre, gave a stentorian version of the Yankee national air of "John Brown lies a mouldering in the grave, " only he altered names and phrases to suit his disgust for his Northern auditors. He also produced "Dixie" and the "Bonnie Blue Flag." When the officer returned and the best pushed off, cheers were given for Jeff. Davis, and three tremendous groans for old Abe-Lincoln. The Yankees retorted not
lockade-running steamer Ruby at Havana. The Ruby was obliged to put into Matanzas during heavy weather. The letter says: While there the Federal cruiser Sonora came in and anchored so near her that there was scarcely room for the two vessels to swing clear of each other. Capt Pest being determined to test the intentions of his neighbor, threw some shavings, &c., into his furnace, and made a smoke, whereupon the Federal got up steam, beat his men to quarters, and ran out his guns. Capt. Peat applied to the Spanish Admiral for protection, and was actuated that he should not be molested while he was within Spanish jurisdiction. The British war steamer Ariadne, just then arriving, took charge of the Ruby, and in broad daylight col. vowed her to Havana. The affair created much indignation among the British and Spaniards, and much impotent wrath among the Yankees in Mataunas. I am informed that the Captain of the Arleane called on Admiral Wilkes, in Havans, and told him he would
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 6
h and Black committee the faces of the crew, while the officer in command was evidently nervous and nonplussed — During the stay of the boat at the wharf, the darkles indulged in such cynical reflections as these: "Golly, how dey'd put out if de 290 was in sight." "I wonder if day's heard from Charleston?" "If Cap'n Maffit was here hold sick dom in two minutes" A big negro on a cotton bale, surrounded by his tatlelitre, gave a stentorian version of the Yankee national air of "John Brown lies a mouldering in the grave, " only he altered names and phrases to suit his disgust for his Northern auditors. He also produced "Dixie" and the "Bonnie Blue Flag." When the officer returned and the best pushed off, cheers were given for Jeff. Davis, and three tremendous groans for old Abe-Lincoln. The Yankees retorted not a word. When the sun rose the next day the Vanderbilt had disappeared — gone to Charleston, it is said. This ebony outbreak in favor of "Dixie" was entirely spontaneous
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 6
h and Black committee the faces of the crew, while the officer in command was evidently nervous and nonplussed — During the stay of the boat at the wharf, the darkles indulged in such cynical reflections as these: "Golly, how dey'd put out if de 290 was in sight." "I wonder if day's heard from Charleston?" "If Cap'n Maffit was here hold sick dom in two minutes" A big negro on a cotton bale, surrounded by his tatlelitre, gave a stentorian version of the Yankee national air of "John Brown lies a mouldering in the grave, " only he altered names and phrases to suit his disgust for his Northern auditors. He also produced "Dixie" and the "Bonnie Blue Flag." When the officer returned and the best pushed off, cheers were given for Jeff. Davis, and three tremendous groans for old Abe-Lincoln. The Yankees retorted not a word. When the sun rose the next day the Vanderbilt had disappeared — gone to Charleston, it is said. This ebony outbreak in favor of "Dixie" was entirely spontaneous
From Nassau --A Colored Demonstration--A letter from Nassau, the 18th, to the Charleston Courtier, announces the sale arrival of the blockade-running steamer Ruby at Havana. The Ruby was obliged to put into Matanzas during heavy weather. The letter says: While there the Federal cruiser Sonora came in and anchored so near her that there was scarcely room for the two vessels to swing clear of each other. Capt Pest being determined to test the intentions of his neighbor, threw some shavings, &c., into his furnace, and made a smoke, whereupon the Federal got up steam, beat his men to quarters, and ran out his guns. Capt. Peat applied to the Spanish Admiral for protection, and was actuated that he should not be molested while he was within Spanish jurisdiction. The British war steamer Ariadne, just then arriving, took charge of the Ruby, and in broad daylight col. vowed her to Havana. The affair created much indignation among the British and Spaniards, and much impotent wr
From Nassau --A Colored Demonstration--A letter from Nassau, the 18th, to the Charleston Courtier, announces the sale arrival of the blockade-running steamer Ruby at Havana. The Ruby was obliged to put into Matanzas during heavy weather. The letter says: While there the Federal cruiser Sonora came in and anchored so near her that there was scarcely room for the two vessels to swing clear of each other. Capt Pest being determined to test the intentions of his neighbor, threw some shavings, &c., into his furnace, and made a smoke, whereupon the Federal got up steam, beat his men to quarters, and ran out his guns. Capt. Peat applied to the Spanish Admiral for protection, and was actuated that he should not be molested while he was within Spanish jurisdiction. The British war steamer Ariadne, just then arriving, took charge of the Ruby, and in broad daylight col. vowed her to Havana. The affair created much indignation among the British and Spaniards, and much impotent w
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