hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. H. F. Lee 24 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 16 0 Browse Search
James E. Jackson 16 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 11 1 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 10 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 10 0 Browse Search
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Gen Hooker 10 0 Browse Search
Gen Banks 10 0 Browse Search
Wirt Adams 9 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 17 total hits in 4 results.

Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
. According to General Lee the enemy was on that day, under the combined attack of Jackson in the rear and Longstreet in front, driven to within one mile of Chancellorsville, probably a distance of four miles. The contest was renewed on Sunday morning, and the enemy "was dislodged from all his positions around Chancellorsville, aChancellorsville, and driven back to wards the Rappahannock," over which he was retreating when General Lee wrote his dispatch — at what hour on Sunday the paper itself does not show. Ere this goes to press we may have further particulars of this triumph, inferior in importance to none of the very many which have crowned the arms of the Southeror, contending, as it was, with the odds of numbers and superior appliances and enginery of war, must, of course, have a name. It is either to take that of "Chancellorsville" or "Wilderness." The latter would not be inappropriate. It was "out of the Wilderness" that Jackson drove the Yankees: equally merciful beasts of prey and
James E. Jackson (search for this): article 1
en behind the enemy begun on Saturday. According to General Lee the enemy was on that day, under the combined attack of Jackson in the rear and Longstreet in front, driven to within one mile of Chancellorsville, probably a distance of four miles. T that of "Chancellorsville" or "Wilderness." The latter would not be inappropriate. It was "out of the Wilderness" that Jackson drove the Yankees: equally merciful beasts of prey and plunder choose the Wilderness for a hiding place from which to deks and herds. To seek them there and end their depredations is the part of the sagacious, practiced, and brave hunter. Jackson is just such a hunter of the hordes which are infesting the homes, the garners, and fields of the South. He crashed upokson is just such a hunter of the hordes which are infesting the homes, the garners, and fields of the South. He crashed upon them in the Wilderness, killing and wounding and pursuing them. Thus "Jackson drove the Yankees out of the Wilderness."
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): article 1
rms, we were made to say the battle was fought on Saturday. The main fight after the heroic Jackson had gotten behind the enemy begun on Saturday. According to General Lee the enemy was on that day, under the combined attack of Jackson in the rear and Longstreet in front, driven to within one mile of Chancellorsville, probably a dning, and the enemy "was dislodged from all his positions around Chancellorsville, and driven back to wards the Rappahannock," over which he was retreating when General Lee wrote his dispatch — at what hour on Sunday the paper itself does not show. Ere this goes to press we may have further particulars of this triumph, inferior in importance to none of the very many which have crowned the arms of the Southern Confederacy. With only the brief message of Gen. Lee to inform us everybody knows the victory is great. That distinguished military leader, whose modesty is equal to his merits, and one of whose prominent traits is his conscientiousness, would n
Longstreet (search for this): article 1
The great victory. Owing to an omission in printing some remarks in yesterday's Dispatch upon the last important victory of Southern arms, we were made to say the battle was fought on Saturday. The main fight after the heroic Jackson had gotten behind the enemy begun on Saturday. According to General Lee the enemy was on that day, under the combined attack of Jackson in the rear and Longstreet in front, driven to within one mile of Chancellorsville, probably a distance of four miles. The contest was renewed on Sunday morning, and the enemy "was dislodged from all his positions around Chancellorsville, and driven back to wards the Rappahannock," over which he was retreating when General Lee wrote his dispatch — at what hour on Sunday the paper itself does not show. Ere this goes to press we may have further particulars of this triumph, inferior in importance to none of the very many which have crowned the arms of the Southern Confederacy. With only the brief message of Gen.