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ngton Chronicle says "the call of the nation, in her great agony, (for five hundred thousand men,) should reach every heart." We have no doubt it will; but the sensations produced will be anything but agreeable. The nation (meaning thereby Lincoln & Co.) may call with all its lungs; but when the details of the ghastly carnage at the Wilderness come to be known, the call will awaken "an agony" of horror in every heart which it reaches. The natural response will be, "Why don't you go yoursnviting other people to?" But all these remonstrances will be of no avail. The five hundred thousand may as well make up their minds to follow the five hundred thousand who have gone before them.--And if they have not the courage to resist Lincoln's standing army, what may they expect when they come to confront the warriors who have so often cut the minions of Lincolnism to pieces? There is a dismal prospect before them. Their only encouragement is the confession which the late battle h
W. H. Seward (search for this): article 3
"the call of the nation, in her great agony, (for five hundred thousand men,) should reach every heart." We have no doubt it will; but the sensations produced will be anything but agreeable. The nation (meaning thereby Lincoln & Co.) may call with all its lungs; but when the details of the ghastly carnage at the Wilderness come to be known, the call will awaken "an agony" of horror in every heart which it reaches. The natural response will be, "Why don't you go yourself? Old Abe, W. H. Seward, Washington Chronicle, and other bellicose throats of the nation, all nearer the scene of conflict than those you call upon, why don't you girl on your swords and hurry to the bloody banquet you are so fond of inviting other people to?" But all these remonstrances will be of no avail. The five hundred thousand may as well make up their minds to follow the five hundred thousand who have gone before them.--And if they have not the courage to resist Lincoln's standing army, what may th