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Clinton (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 7
d it was countermanded. In Kentucky matters are assuming a serious aspect, the rebels being reported in force across the Cumberland. Morgan, with the commands of Forrest and Wheeler, is at Monticello, the espital of Wayne county, 100 miles south from Frankfort. Our forces are confronting the rebels, and we may expect, stirring word from Southern Kentucky in a brief period. Little that is satisfactory has been received from Gen. Grant. He met the rebels, under Gen. Bowen, at Clinton, Miss., and, after a well-fought engagement; defeated and forced them back upon Jackson; but discovering that heavy columns of troops were reinforcing them from Charleston and Mobile, he judiciously retired toward the river. Joseph E. Johnston is expected by the rebels to reach Vicksburg in time to command in the coming battle. They believe themselves competent to hold the city against Grant, but think that, it Vicksburg falls, their hopes of a Southern Confederacy are dashed forever. Fr
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 7
crossing the Rappahannock again, according to the plan conceived before his retirement; but General Halleck did not approve the new movement, and it was countermanded. In Kentucky matters are assuming a serious aspect, the rebels being reported in force across the Cumberland. Morgan, with the commands of Forrest and Wheeler, is at Monticello, the espital of Wayne county, 100 miles south from Frankfort. Our forces are confronting the rebels, and we may expect, stirring word from Southern Kentucky in a brief period. Little that is satisfactory has been received from Gen. Grant. He met the rebels, under Gen. Bowen, at Clinton, Miss., and, after a well-fought engagement; defeated and forced them back upon Jackson; but discovering that heavy columns of troops were reinforcing them from Charleston and Mobile, he judiciously retired toward the river. Joseph E. Johnston is expected by the rebels to reach Vicksburg in time to command in the coming battle. They believe themselve
New Creek (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
d toward the river. Joseph E. Johnston is expected by the rebels to reach Vicksburg in time to command in the coming battle. They believe themselves competent to hold the city against Grant, but think that, it Vicksburg falls, their hopes of a Southern Confederacy are dashed forever. From West Virginia we learn that Floyd is moving forward at the head of ten thousand men to reinforce Jones and Imboden, with a view to advance upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at some point between New Creek and Wheeling. Energetic measures have been taken by Gen-Kelly to rid West Virginia of the prowling bandits who have infested the mountains and valleys for some time past, and it is now hoped that quiet will be speedily restored to the State. The iron-clads were still in the vicinity of Port Royal, and no indications of an attack upon Fort Sumter were apparent. The Northern press on the death of Stonewall Jackson. We are enabled to give fuller extracts from the Northern press
Dry Tortugas (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 7
to sending him South. In reference to the case of Vallandigham, the American says: "The true friends of the Union will learn with infinite satisfaction that the pestilent traitor — Vallandigham — so long permitted to defy and insult the Government, and all who stand by it to put down a godless rebellion, has at last a prospect of getting a modicum of his dues in being assigned to the care of his congeners in Dixie — a commutation of that sentence which should have sent him a felon to Dry Tortugas." A dispatch from New York, dated the 14th has the following news about the "pirate"Alabama: The ship Antelope, from Calcutta, reports as follows: April 23d, in lat. 2 N., long, 29:31 W., spoke the British ship Victory, the captain of which reported that on the 10th of April, ten miles south of the equator, in long 29:40, at 8 A. M., was boarded by an officer from a steamer, who reported her as the United States steamer Iroquois, and was anxious to know if the Victory had seen a<
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
river. Joseph E. Johnston is expected by the rebels to reach Vicksburg in time to command in the coming battle. They believe themselves competent to hold the city against Grant, but think that, it Vicksburg falls, their hopes of a Southern Confederacy are dashed forever. From West Virginia we learn that Floyd is moving forward at the head of ten thousand men to reinforce Jones and Imboden, with a view to advance upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at some point between New Creek and Wheeling. Energetic measures have been taken by Gen-Kelly to rid West Virginia of the prowling bandits who have infested the mountains and valleys for some time past, and it is now hoped that quiet will be speedily restored to the State. The iron-clads were still in the vicinity of Port Royal, and no indications of an attack upon Fort Sumter were apparent. The Northern press on the death of Stonewall Jackson. We are enabled to give fuller extracts from the Northern press written after
Monticello (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 7
ellent, and that the men are drilling and are ready to give battle whenever their commander designates the time and place. It seems Gen. Hooker did design crossing the Rappahannock again, according to the plan conceived before his retirement; but General Halleck did not approve the new movement, and it was countermanded. In Kentucky matters are assuming a serious aspect, the rebels being reported in force across the Cumberland. Morgan, with the commands of Forrest and Wheeler, is at Monticello, the espital of Wayne county, 100 miles south from Frankfort. Our forces are confronting the rebels, and we may expect, stirring word from Southern Kentucky in a brief period. Little that is satisfactory has been received from Gen. Grant. He met the rebels, under Gen. Bowen, at Clinton, Miss., and, after a well-fought engagement; defeated and forced them back upon Jackson; but discovering that heavy columns of troops were reinforcing them from Charleston and Mobile, he judiciously
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
irginia we learn that Floyd is moving forward at the head of ten thousand men to reinforce Jones and Imboden, with a view to advance upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at some point between New Creek and Wheeling. Energetic measures have been taken by Gen-Kelly to rid West Virginia of the prowling bandits who have infested the mountains and valleys for some time past, and it is now hoped that quiet will be speedily restored to the State. The iron-clads were still in the vicinity of Port Royal, and no indications of an attack upon Fort Sumter were apparent. The Northern press on the death of Stonewall Jackson. We are enabled to give fuller extracts from the Northern press written after the receipt of the intelligence of the death of Gen. Jackson. The Herald says: By intelligence we published yesterday from Richmond, via Hooker's army on the Rappahannock, our readers have learned that the celebrated Stonewall Jackson died on Sunday last, partly from pneumonia and
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 7
icum of his dues in being assigned to the care of his congeners in Dixie — a commutation of that sentence which should have sent him a felon to Dry Tortugas." A dispatch from New York, dated the 14th has the following news about the "pirate"Alabama: The ship Antelope, from Calcutta, reports as follows: April 23d, in lat. 2 N., long, 29:31 W., spoke the British ship Victory, the captain of which reported that on the 10th of April, ten miles south of the equator, in long 29:40, at 8 A. oard his vessel, which then steamed towards the ship. It was calm all day, and at 7 o'clock they saw the ship on fire. The steamer was bark rigged, and mounted seven guns. She had a shield figure head, and was, undoubtedly, the British pirate Alabama. News from the Army of the Potomac represents everything as quiet. The troops are resting and preparing themselves for another encounter with the enemy. All accounts indicate that the morale of the several corps is excellent, and that the
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
n lat. 2 N., long, 29:31 W., spoke the British ship Victory, the captain of which reported that on the 10th of April, ten miles south of the equator, in long 29:40, at 8 A. M., was boarded by an officer from a steamer, who reported her as the United States steamer Iroquois, and was anxious to know if the Victory had seen any American vessels. There was then a ship in sight and the officer went aboard his vessel, which then steamed towards the ship. It was calm all day, and at 7 o'clock thpty of defenders as were the rebel earthworks at Richmond. Gen. Lee is presumed to be meditating the offensive, from the fact that he has detained the surgeons and nurses who crossed with the ambulances to look after our wounded. At the United States and Banks's fords he has placed batteries in position, and it looks much as if he designed an advance over the Rappahannock; and an attack upon our army. It may be, however, that he himself fears a forward movement on the part of Gen. Hooker
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
Banks's corps employed, and struck terror at Washington, by a rapid retrograde movement he appeared on the battle field, in the seven days fight on the Chickahominy, to turn the scale just at the critical moment, while McDowell was non est, like Patterson at Bull Run. --Again, when Pope was retreating from the Rapidan and the Rappahannock, Jackson, by forced marches, gained his flank, caused terrible confusion, and obtained vast spoil. Lastly, at the battle of Autistam, after capturing Harper's Ferry, he turned up on the right flank of our army in time to repulse Hooker, save the remnant of Lee's force, and prevent the battle from becoming a rout. Wherever Jackson appeared on any field victory seems to have perched upon his banners. In his demeanor he is represented as having been extremely quiet and modest, plain and unostentatious in his dress, silent and thoughtful; in his habits temperate, in his conduct strictly moral, and in religion he is said to have been almost a fanat
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