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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: May 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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James Harrison (search for this): article 5
The paroled story. --Mr. James Harrison, who was charged upon the authority of Lieut. Lee in the New York Tribune with asserting to him (Lee) in the Libby prison, that three hundred of Stoneman's Yankees could have entered this city and destroyed a great deal of property, and gotten off safely, utterly denies the story. He asserts, on the contrary, that he assumed that the city was so well guarded that Stoneman could not have reached it at all — making his remark to this effect in reply to Lee, who contended that the city could have been surprised by a small force.
The paroled story. --Mr. James Harrison, who was charged upon the authority of Lieut. Lee in the New York Tribune with asserting to him (Lee) in the Libby prison, that three hundred of Stoneman's Yankees could have entered this city and destroyed a great deal of property, and gotten off safely, utterly denies the story. He Lee) in the Libby prison, that three hundred of Stoneman's Yankees could have entered this city and destroyed a great deal of property, and gotten off safely, utterly denies the story. He asserts, on the contrary, that he assumed that the city was so well guarded that Stoneman could not have reached it at all — making his remark to this effect in reply to Lee, who contended that the city could have been surprised by a small force. royed a great deal of property, and gotten off safely, utterly denies the story. He asserts, on the contrary, that he assumed that the city was so well guarded that Stoneman could not have reached it at all — making his remark to this effect in reply to Lee, who contended that the city could have been surprised by a small forc
The paroled story. --Mr. James Harrison, who was charged upon the authority of Lieut. Lee in the New York Tribune with asserting to him (Lee) in the Libby prison, that three hundred of Stoneman's Yankees could have entered this city and destroyed a great deal of property, and gotten off safely, utterly denies the story. He asserts, on the contrary, that he assumed that the city was so well guarded that Stoneman could not have reached it at all — making his remark to this effect in reply ty of Lieut. Lee in the New York Tribune with asserting to him (Lee) in the Libby prison, that three hundred of Stoneman's Yankees could have entered this city and destroyed a great deal of property, and gotten off safely, utterly denies the story. He asserts, on the contrary, that he assumed that the city was so well guarded that Stoneman could not have reached it at all — making his remark to this effect in reply to Lee, who contended that the city could have been surprised by a small forc