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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Kingston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
The attack on Knoxville. The pretty full telegrams from Knoxville give us the particulars of the Federal attack on Knoxville, Tenn, on Saturday last, and a letter from Chattanooga enables us to supply the particulars of the movements of the Yankees before the attack was made. The party was commanded by Gen. Carter, the Tennessee renegade, and numbered about 2,000 men. They penetrated into East Tennessee through a gap in the mountains near Kingston, and marched on London, a town of 1,500 inhabitants, on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, 28 miles west of Knoxville, intending to burn the railroad bridge at that place; but, finding the bridge well surrounded by stockades and defended by artillery, they moved off to Lenoir, about seven miles nearer Knoxville, on the same road. Here they burnt the mammoth factory of the Lenoir Brothers, with all the out- buildings and the residence of the owners, and tore up the track for several miles. The 54th Virginia regiment, which had b
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
and a letter from Chattanooga enables us to supply the particulars of the movements of the Yankees before the attack was made. The party was commanded by Gen. Carter, the Tennessee renegade, and numbered about 2,000 men. They penetrated into East Tennessee through a gap in the mountains near Kingston, and marched on London, a town of 1,500 inhabitants, on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, 28 miles west of Knoxville, intending to burn the railroad bridge at that place; but, finding the bEast Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, 28 miles west of Knoxville, intending to burn the railroad bridge at that place; but, finding the bridge well surrounded by stockades and defended by artillery, they moved off to Lenoir, about seven miles nearer Knoxville, on the same road. Here they burnt the mammoth factory of the Lenoir Brothers, with all the out- buildings and the residence of the owners, and tore up the track for several miles. The 54th Virginia regiment, which had been stationed there, had just left that morning for Knoxville, and the place was therefore defenceless. They told two citizens, whom they captured there,
Morristown, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
the out- buildings and the residence of the owners, and tore up the track for several miles. The 54th Virginia regiment, which had been stationed there, had just left that morning for Knoxville, and the place was therefore defenceless. They told two citizens, whom they captured there, that they were going on to burn Knoxville. The result of their going on is given in the telegraphic dispatches. The raid came just as the section of country South of London had been transferred from Gen. Buckner's department to that of Gen. Jackson, at Chattanooga, and in the movement or troops consequent on the change several places were left undefended, which would not have been the case if the transfer had taken place a few days later or earlier. It will be seen from the telegrams that after their repulse at Knoxville the Yankees came as far east as Morristown, on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, which is 88 miles from Bristol. There, it appears, they were likely to come to grief.
Lenoirs (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
of the Yankees before the attack was made. The party was commanded by Gen. Carter, the Tennessee renegade, and numbered about 2,000 men. They penetrated into East Tennessee through a gap in the mountains near Kingston, and marched on London, a town of 1,500 inhabitants, on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, 28 miles west of Knoxville, intending to burn the railroad bridge at that place; but, finding the bridge well surrounded by stockades and defended by artillery, they moved off to Lenoir, about seven miles nearer Knoxville, on the same road. Here they burnt the mammoth factory of the Lenoir Brothers, with all the out- buildings and the residence of the owners, and tore up the track for several miles. The 54th Virginia regiment, which had been stationed there, had just left that morning for Knoxville, and the place was therefore defenceless. They told two citizens, whom they captured there, that they were going on to burn Knoxville. The result of their going on is given i
all the out- buildings and the residence of the owners, and tore up the track for several miles. The 54th Virginia regiment, which had been stationed there, had just left that morning for Knoxville, and the place was therefore defenceless. They told two citizens, whom they captured there, that they were going on to burn Knoxville. The result of their going on is given in the telegraphic dispatches. The raid came just as the section of country South of London had been transferred from Gen. Buckner's department to that of Gen. Jackson, at Chattanooga, and in the movement or troops consequent on the change several places were left undefended, which would not have been the case if the transfer had taken place a few days later or earlier. It will be seen from the telegrams that after their repulse at Knoxville the Yankees came as far east as Morristown, on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, which is 88 miles from Bristol. There, it appears, they were likely to come to grie
the out- buildings and the residence of the owners, and tore up the track for several miles. The 54th Virginia regiment, which had been stationed there, had just left that morning for Knoxville, and the place was therefore defenceless. They told two citizens, whom they captured there, that they were going on to burn Knoxville. The result of their going on is given in the telegraphic dispatches. The raid came just as the section of country South of London had been transferred from Gen. Buckner's department to that of Gen. Jackson, at Chattanooga, and in the movement or troops consequent on the change several places were left undefended, which would not have been the case if the transfer had taken place a few days later or earlier. It will be seen from the telegrams that after their repulse at Knoxville the Yankees came as far east as Morristown, on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, which is 88 miles from Bristol. There, it appears, they were likely to come to grief.
Frances Carter (search for this): article 7
The attack on Knoxville. The pretty full telegrams from Knoxville give us the particulars of the Federal attack on Knoxville, Tenn, on Saturday last, and a letter from Chattanooga enables us to supply the particulars of the movements of the Yankees before the attack was made. The party was commanded by Gen. Carter, the Tennessee renegade, and numbered about 2,000 men. They penetrated into East Tennessee through a gap in the mountains near Kingston, and marched on London, a town of 1,500 inhabitants, on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, 28 miles west of Knoxville, intending to burn the railroad bridge at that place; but, finding the bridge well surrounded by stockades and defended by artillery, they moved off to Lenoir, about seven miles nearer Knoxville, on the same road. Here they burnt the mammoth factory of the Lenoir Brothers, with all the out- buildings and the residence of the owners, and tore up the track for several miles. The 54th Virginia regiment, which had