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Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 5
Dr. Plumer. This distinguished Divine, so widely known at the South, and who, not long ago, was before the public at Pittsburg, Pa., upon the question of his loyalty, it is stated now has charge of a church in Philadelphia. Dr. Plumer's course on the occasion of his arraignment was quite strange in the opinion of his old friends at the South. He was President of Alleghany College, an institution established by the Presbyterian Church, and was also pastor of one of the churches of the city, having a large and wealthy congregation. Dr. P. did not please them on the subject of the war.--He was too non-committal, and would not pray for the success of the Federal arms. He would go no further than to pray for peace and restoration. They put him on trial, and he made a defence which satisfied a majority of his flock, and the balance withdrew from his church. Outsiders, however, caught up the matter, and the press became denunciatory. The Doctor at last yielded to the Abolition pr
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
ay for the success of the Federal arms. He would go no further than to pray for peace and restoration. They put him on trial, and he made a defence which satisfied a majority of his flock, and the balance withdrew from his church. Outsiders, however, caught up the matter, and the press became denunciatory. The Doctor at last yielded to the Abolition pressure so far as to publish a card, in which he declared that under the Providence of God he had been born under the Government of the United States, and believing that Governments were ordained of Heaven, to that his allegiance was due and should be given, even to the extent of his physical powers if needed. This was understood to quiet the excitement against him, but it is stated that he still persisted in his refusal to modify his prayers, and as we find him now pastor of a church in Philadelphia we infer that the Abolitionists of Pittsburg and Alleghany made his situation there too hot for him and he was forced to leave it.
Dr. Plumer. This distinguished Divine, so widely known at the South, and who, not long ago, was before the public at Pittsburg, Pa., upon the question of his loyalty, it is stated now has charge of a church in Philadelphia. Dr. Plumer's course on the occasion of his arraignment was quite strange in the opinion of his old friends at the South. He was President of Alleghany College, an institution established by the Presbyterian Church, and was also pastor of one of the churches of the citDr. Plumer's course on the occasion of his arraignment was quite strange in the opinion of his old friends at the South. He was President of Alleghany College, an institution established by the Presbyterian Church, and was also pastor of one of the churches of the city, having a large and wealthy congregation. Dr. P. did not please them on the subject of the war.--He was too non-committal, and would not pray for the success of the Federal arms. He would go no further than to pray for peace and restoration. They put him on trial, and he made a defence which satisfied a majority of his flock, and the balance withdrew from his church. Outsiders, however, caught up the matter, and the press became denunciatory. The Doctor at last yielded to the Abolition pr