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Jefferson (search for this): article 1
e; and they prove their devotion to it by maintaining with their blood and their lives the rights and principles asserted by our fathers in 76. The Yankees will probably to-day renew their professions of respect and devotion for them, notwithstanding that they have crushed them into the dust. They are hypocrites and Pharisees enough for that. The Declaration of Independence, fringed and gilt with certain transcendentalisms, imbibed from the French philosophy of the day, with which Mr. Jefferson and his contemporaries had become somewhat inoculated, set forth the popular rights for which we are this day battling. The main principles it asserted the Yankees never could approve. It is that Governments, "derive their just powers from the consent of the governed." The Yankees think they have a right to govern the Southern people against their consent. They have desecrated both the day and the principles which it commemorates, and the very best way in which we can celebrate i
April, 7 AD (search for this): article 1
The Fourth of July. This is the Fourth of July. In former days it was saluted with the firing of guns, and was honored by grand parades, orations, dinners, and toasts. The Declaration of Independence was generally read. The exertions oratorical were considered too great for one man — so there was a reader and an orator. Fourth of July. In former days it was saluted with the firing of guns, and was honored by grand parades, orations, dinners, and toasts. The Declaration of Independence was generally read. The exertions oratorical were considered too great for one man — so there was a reader and an orator. The reader recited on solemn and emphatic tones the Declaration. He began with energy, and rose as he continued, until he thundered in the conclusion wherein our forefathers declared that held the British as they held "the rest of nkind --Enemies in War, in peace, friends." Here the roof was perceptibly stated by the powerful any for every nation; for no nation that is civilized and humanized can got along without its holidays-- days of festivity and general joy. Thus we had our Fourth of July. The day is now changed. We have no holiday. The ruthless enemy who has trampled upon every principle and right commemorated by the day itself, gives no in