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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 10
City. Vallandigham and his New York the withdrawal of New Jersey from Pennsylvania. The New York correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, writing on the 24th ult.; says: The steamship British Queen is the next packet due from Nassau, N. P., and a certain class of politicians among us are chuckling over the chances of Clement L. Vallandigham being a passenger. It is, of course, impossible to say upon what grounds that expectation ascertaining ceeded in communicating with theen. I must not be supposed that all Democrat concur in the propriety of a demonstration of that land, in favor of such a man, at such a time. On the contrary, many of them wish him in Davy Jones's locker; or, it not there, that he will go from Nassau to Halifax, or anywhere than to New York, though, at the same they say that if chance should really back here they would have no to "stand by him." The reception are understood to be in communication with a high official functionary at Alban
Madison (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 10
k in military and political circles. The ing opinion is, that the Governor need not have been in so unseemly a hurry to master the men out of the service, seeing that, even while he was writing the proclamation to that effect, the Harrisburg telegrams must have informed him that the danger of a rebel invasion was now more threatening than ever. Grand Gulf to be evacuated — the movement against Grant's Communications. A letter from Grand Gulf, Miss., of the 9th inst., to the Madison (Wisconsin) Journal, referring to the movements of the 12th Wisconsin regiment, says: We have orders to join our division at Vicksburg, and with this end in view all negroes, horses, mules and extras have been sent up the river, and most likely we shall leave here ourselves in a day or two. This point seem to be destined for complete evacuation by our forces, but a surveillance by gunboats will be kept up to prevent reoccupation by the rebels Since General Grant opened his bast of supplies
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 10
that we will dodge our pursuers for a short time. It is my intention to go along the coast, with the view of burning the shipping in some exposed harbor, and of cutting out a steamer." L. P. Jewett, the Yankee Collector of the Port at Portland, Me., telegraphed the following about the affair to Washington. It contains a few particulars not yet printed. They intended to burn the two gunboats here, transfer the anchors and armament to the cutter, and burn and destroy on the coast of Maine. The men are in Port guard. Lieut. C. W. Reed, of the Confederate Navy, was in command, and is a prisoner. The crew of the cutter seemed to have escaped before she was blown up, in the boats probably, to a schooner near by, as the Forest City chased one down towards Green Island, caught her, and is towing her in. The Forest City had only 12 pounders, I understand, and the Chesapeake only 6 pounders; but their intention was to run the cutter down at once, as they had no match for h
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 10
n brought him to a stand-still. Captain Davis came up, when Dr. Walker informed him he was a surgeon. Davis then said, "That's all right; consider yourself paroled," and rode off. Thus the evening wore away till about 9 o'clock, when the party left the city and returned to the reserved posted on the hill outside. Before leaving, the rebels visited many of the stores, and bought liquor, cigars, and some small articles, for which they tendered payment in Richmond corporation notes and Georgia money. They made no attempt to take goods by force. They boasted they had plenty of "greenbacks" to pay for what they bought, but in no case that I could learn did they offer any in payment. Sunday dawned bright and clear. The citizens were greatly alarmed, for they knew not what excesses the raiders might commit. The churches, of which there are several fine ones in the city, were all open as usual, but rather slimly attended. The Rev. Dr. Zachariah, of the German Reformed, praye
Alexandria (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 10
eem to be destined for complete evacuation by our forces, but a surveillance by gunboats will be kept up to prevent reoccupation by the rebels Since General Grant opened his bast of supplies at Memphis, and encircled the stronghold of the rebels from Haines's Bluff, to Warrenton, this point has lost its grand importance as the key to Vicksburg, while it lies exposed to attacks from both sides of the river. A few days ago the rebel General Dick Taylor, with a division of troops from Alexandria, La., and General Walker's Texas division, passed by this point up the river. It is believed that a force from Little Rock, Arkansas, is massing preparatory to an attack on the river to cut off Grant's communication with Memphis, and compel him to raise the siege; but all the rebel movements are closely watched and doubtless will be frustrated. Confederate fare in South Carolina. The Richmond correspondent of the London Standard writes that paper an account of his visit to the for
Chesapeake City (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 10
t their intention was to run the cutter down at once, as they had no match for her and her 32 pounders. The Che was manned by 27 men, of the 7th Maine regiment, under Col. Mason, together with company A, State Guards, and city company B, all of which were ready with full rains in half an hour, and also by as many armed citizens as could be conveniently taken, who volunteered with enthusiasm. Capt. Lighter, the Government inspector overseeing and building gunboats here, took charge of the Chesapeake battery. Capt. Willets commanded and Capt. Liscomb the Forest City. Vallandigham and his New York the withdrawal of New Jersey from Pennsylvania. The New York correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, writing on the 24th ult.; says: The steamship British Queen is the next packet due from Nassau, N. P., and a certain class of politicians among us are chuckling over the chances of Clement L. Vallandigham being a passenger. It is, of course, impossible to say upon what g
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
We have orders to join our division at Vicksburg, and with this end in view all negroes, horses, mules and extras have been sent up the river, and most likely we shall leave here ourselves in a day or two. This point seem to be destined for complete evacuation by our forces, but a surveillance by gunboats will be kept up to prevent reoccupation by the rebels Since General Grant opened his bast of supplies at Memphis, and encircled the stronghold of the rebels from Haines's Bluff, to Warrenton, this point has lost its grand importance as the key to Vicksburg, while it lies exposed to attacks from both sides of the river. A few days ago the rebel General Dick Taylor, with a division of troops from Alexandria, La., and General Walker's Texas division, passed by this point up the river. It is believed that a force from Little Rock, Arkansas, is massing preparatory to an attack on the river to cut off Grant's communication with Memphis, and compel him to raise the siege; but a
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 10
rew on board the schooner Archer, and at 2 A. M. set fire to the Tacony and steered west. The schooner Archer is a fishing vessel of 90 tons, sails well, and is easily hundred. No Yankee gunboat would ever dream of suspecting us. I, therefore, think that we will dodge our pursuers for a short time. It is my intention to go along the coast, with the view of burning the shipping in some exposed harbor, and of cutting out a steamer." L. P. Jewett, the Yankee Collector of the Port at Portland, Me., telegraphed the following about the affair to Washington. It contains a few particulars not yet printed. They intended to burn the two gunboats here, transfer the anchors and armament to the cutter, and burn and destroy on the coast of Maine. The men are in Port guard. Lieut. C. W. Reed, of the Confederate Navy, was in command, and is a prisoner. The crew of the cutter seemed to have escaped before she was blown up, in the boats probably, to a schooner near by, as the Forest
Boonsboro (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 10
five or thirty of the best horses in the city. The raiders were well clothed, well mounted on fine horses, and armed with carbines and two or three revolves per man. On Monday morning the rebels outside of the city left, going out towards Boonsboro'. In the morning Lieut. Col. Dorrell, 3d Delaware volunteers, and half a dozen others, mounted, came in from the Relay House on a scout. Finding the rebels gone, they returned Later in the day 56 men of the 2d United States regular cavalry, frck towards Frederick on the turnpike road. On approaching the city he made a detour of two or three miles, going round the city, and absolutely succeeded in getting the whole lot safely to Middletown, and thence into the rebel lines beyond Boonsboro' the same night. This was done while the 2d United States cavalry detachment was in Frederick, but the officers knew nothing of the affair until it was over. The Confederate Government and foreign Consult — Representations made at Europe
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 10
egiment, under Col. Mason, together with company A, State Guards, and city company B, all of which were ready with full rains in half an hour, and also by as many armed citizens as could be conveniently taken, who volunteered with enthusiasm. Capt. Lighter, the Government inspector overseeing and building gunboats here, took charge of the Chesapeake battery. Capt. Willets commanded and Capt. Liscomb the Forest City. Vallandigham and his New York the withdrawal of New Jersey from Pennsylvania. The New York correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, writing on the 24th ult.; says: The steamship British Queen is the next packet due from Nassau, N. P., and a certain class of politicians among us are chuckling over the chances of Clement L. Vallandigham being a passenger. It is, of course, impossible to say upon what grounds that expectation ascertaining ceeded in communicating with this city since his exit to Dixie, but this much you may rely upon: Preparation have b
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