hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George G. Meade 27 1 Browse Search
Gen Reynolds 26 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 17 1 Browse Search
W. S. Rosecrans 16 0 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 14 0 Browse Search
McClellan 12 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 12 2 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 12 0 Browse Search
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 6, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 15 total hits in 7 results.

Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ne doubt, after this, that when the Yankees say an affair is indecisive, they are in fact badly whipped? But if they are not whipped, why do they shout so vociferously for reinforcements? The Baltimore American tells us that up to Thursday they had captured 6,000 prisoners. but it accounts for only 800, although General Schenck announces that 1,500 more were to come on. On Thursday there was no general battle, but heavy skirmishing, in which 5,000 prisoners, making 11,000 in all, were captured. The gallant Dutchmen who distinguished themselves by running so at Chancellorsville, it seems, demolished Longstreet's corps and captured a thousand prisoners. These lies are for gross even for Yankee credulity. The fact seems to be that a division of the army has kept the whole Yankee force at bay two days, and that Gen. Lee is rapidly concentrating in the neighborhood of Gettysburg In a few days we expect to hear that Meade's army has been defeated, and probably annihilated.
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
hantly beaten back. But a little farther on we discover that towards the close of the action these same "rebels" made an attack upon one of the enemy's flanks, and that he fell back a mile, fighting valiantly, of course, as Yankees always do--on paper.--Lastly, the Yankees say the affair is "indecisive," which is proof enough that they have been badly beaten. Had it--really been indecisive, they would have claimed a decided victory. It is only necessary to remember what McClellan did at Sharpsburg to be convinced of this. That affair was anything but indecisive McClellan was beaten with immense slaughter. He retreated in the night, and the next day Gen. Lee could hear nothing of him; although he shelled all the woods in the neighborhood to start him from his covert. Had Gen. Lee followed him, beyond a question he would have continued his retreat. But the force of that General was too feeble, in comparison with the enormous Yankee army, to justify the risk. After holding the bat
Gen Schenck (search for this): article 1
say that we really have gained a victory." He was so crippled, in the meantime, that he would not follow, and was removed for not doing what was impossible. Can any one doubt, after this, that when the Yankees say an affair is indecisive, they are in fact badly whipped? But if they are not whipped, why do they shout so vociferously for reinforcements? The Baltimore American tells us that up to Thursday they had captured 6,000 prisoners. but it accounts for only 800, although General Schenck announces that 1,500 more were to come on. On Thursday there was no general battle, but heavy skirmishing, in which 5,000 prisoners, making 11,000 in all, were captured. The gallant Dutchmen who distinguished themselves by running so at Chancellorsville, it seems, demolished Longstreet's corps and captured a thousand prisoners. These lies are for gross even for Yankee credulity. The fact seems to be that a division of the army has kept the whole Yankee force at bay two days, and t
George G. Meade (search for this): article 1
e doubt, after this, that when the Yankees say an affair is indecisive, they are in fact badly whipped? But if they are not whipped, why do they shout so vociferously for reinforcements? The Baltimore American tells us that up to Thursday they had captured 6,000 prisoners. but it accounts for only 800, although General Schenck announces that 1,500 more were to come on. On Thursday there was no general battle, but heavy skirmishing, in which 5,000 prisoners, making 11,000 in all, were captured. The gallant Dutchmen who distinguished themselves by running so at Chancellorsville, it seems, demolished Longstreet's corps and captured a thousand prisoners. These lies are for gross even for Yankee credulity. The fact seems to be that a division of the army has kept the whole Yankee force at bay two days, and that Gen. Lee is rapidly concentrating in the neighborhood of Gettysburg In a few days we expect to hear that Meade's army has been defeated, and probably annihilated.
Longstreet (search for this): article 1
ne doubt, after this, that when the Yankees say an affair is indecisive, they are in fact badly whipped? But if they are not whipped, why do they shout so vociferously for reinforcements? The Baltimore American tells us that up to Thursday they had captured 6,000 prisoners. but it accounts for only 800, although General Schenck announces that 1,500 more were to come on. On Thursday there was no general battle, but heavy skirmishing, in which 5,000 prisoners, making 11,000 in all, were captured. The gallant Dutchmen who distinguished themselves by running so at Chancellorsville, it seems, demolished Longstreet's corps and captured a thousand prisoners. These lies are for gross even for Yankee credulity. The fact seems to be that a division of the army has kept the whole Yankee force at bay two days, and that Gen. Lee is rapidly concentrating in the neighborhood of Gettysburg In a few days we expect to hear that Meade's army has been defeated, and probably annihilated.
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): article 1
sburg to be convinced of this. That affair was anything but indecisive McClellan was beaten with immense slaughter. He retreated in the night, and the next day Gen. Lee could hear nothing of him; although he shelled all the woods in the neighborhood to start him from his covert. Had Gen. Lee followed him, beyond a question he wGen. Lee followed him, beyond a question he would have continued his retreat. But the force of that General was too feeble, in comparison with the enormous Yankee army, to justify the risk. After holding the battle field twenty-four hours he withdrew, and McClellan, learning the fact by his scouts, sneaked up, occupied it, and wrote: "I think I may now say that we really rs. These lies are for gross even for Yankee credulity. The fact seems to be that a division of the army has kept the whole Yankee force at bay two days, and that Gen. Lee is rapidly concentrating in the neighborhood of Gettysburg In a few days we expect to hear that Meade's army has been defeated, and probably annihilated.
McClellan (search for this): article 1
proof enough that they have been badly beaten. Had it--really been indecisive, they would have claimed a decided victory. It is only necessary to remember what McClellan did at Sharpsburg to be convinced of this. That affair was anything but indecisive McClellan was beaten with immense slaughter. He retreated in the night, and McClellan was beaten with immense slaughter. He retreated in the night, and the next day Gen. Lee could hear nothing of him; although he shelled all the woods in the neighborhood to start him from his covert. Had Gen. Lee followed him, beyond a question he would have continued his retreat. But the force of that General was too feeble, in comparison with the enormous Yankee army, to justify the risk. After holding the battle field twenty-four hours he withdrew, and McClellan, learning the fact by his scouts, sneaked up, occupied it, and wrote: "I think I may now say that we really have gained a victory." He was so crippled, in the meantime, that he would not follow, and was removed for not doing what was impossible. Can any one