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April, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
t finally surrendered, and were brought to Richmond. A Federal gunboat was in the Mattaponi river, seven miles from its mouth, on the same day, and it is apprehended that the enemy, by way of revenge, will shell the houses at Walkerton and other points in the neighborhood. The gallant dead. Perhaps no regiment in the Confederate service has sustained a greater loss in officers since its entrance into service than the 2d regiment of Virginia volunteers. Since its organization in April, 1861, it has lost no less than three field officers. The first Lieutenant-Colonel, Luckland, who distinguished himself at the battle of Manassas, died a short time after that engagement from disease augmented by exposure; the second Colonel, J. W. Allen, who fought gallantly under Jackson in the Valley, was killed on the field in the fight at Gaines's Mill, on Fridays the 27th; and the third, Major Francis B. Jones, received a mortal wound in the same engagement. Major Jones was brought to th
dopting Rappahannock county as a base of operation, the enemy may throw a force into Page. Shenandoah, and Rockingham, and at the same time keep an eye upon any movement that might have for its object the clearing out of the Valley. The rout of Banks, Shields, and Fremont, by Jackson's army, has proved a bitter dose to Yankeeism, and every possible resource will be exhausted with a view to wipe out the painful recollection of that event. The Affair at Walkerton. We have received some one of the companies from the Valley found on the field a number of letters, addressed to different members of the very company to which he was attached. They were discovered to be letters from their friends in the Valley, written previous to Gen. Banks's retreat and while the enemy's lines had communication cut off. Among these were two or three letters from Maryland. The presumption is, that these letters were taken from some one who had attempted to run the blockade, but had fallen into th
ived that the enemy's Stray in the Valley of Virginia has moved forward on Flout Hill, in Rappahannock, county, and there found a junction with a portion of McDowell's The number of men now at that point is imated at eighteen thousand. By adopting Rappahannock county as a base of operation, the enemy may throw a force into Page. Shenandoah, and Rockingham, and at the same time keep an eye upon any movement that might have for its object the clearing out of the Valley. The rout of Banks, Shields, and Fremont, by Jackson's army, has proved a bitter dose to Yankeeism, and every possible resource will be exhausted with a view to wipe out the painful recollection of that event. The Affair at Walkerton. We have received some further particulars of the attack upon a marauding party of Yankees at Walkerton, King and Queen county, on Tuesday last. It appears that the party was sent up to capture a wagon load of bacon and burn a lighter; but on arriving at the landing the vessel c
enemy's Stray in the Valley of Virginia has moved forward on Flout Hill, in Rappahannock, county, and there found a junction with a portion of McDowell's The number of men now at that point is imated at eighteen thousand. By adopting Rappahannock county as a base of operation, the enemy may throw a force into Page. Shenandoah, and Rockingham, and at the same time keep an eye upon any movement that might have for its object the clearing out of the Valley. The rout of Banks, Shields, and Fremont, by Jackson's army, has proved a bitter dose to Yankeeism, and every possible resource will be exhausted with a view to wipe out the painful recollection of that event. The Affair at Walkerton. We have received some further particulars of the attack upon a marauding party of Yankees at Walkerton, King and Queen county, on Tuesday last. It appears that the party was sent up to capture a wagon load of bacon and burn a lighter; but on arriving at the landing the vessel could not be f
George B. McClellan (search for this): article 1
ver. This is probably true, and although the War Department has no authentic intelligence of the fact, it is generally conceded that probabilities tend to confirm the report. Before another advance on Richmond — if another is ever attempted — McClellan must reorganize his army, and it is scarcely to be supposed that he would select a point so remote from the seacoast as Berkeley for this purpose. It is much more likely that he will, permitted to do so, withdraw his army from the swamps and 't care which side whipped. A Yankee surgeon overhearing the conversation, immediately approached and ordered the indiscreet soldier to resume his vocation of fanning the wounded men, and not talk so much. Persons who left Baltimore as late as the 5th of July, represent that the news of McClellan's reverse before Richmond occasioned greet rejoicing among the "rebel sympathizers" in the city. It was with difficulty that an open demonstration of joy was repressed by the Federal rulers
ter loss in officers since its entrance into service than the 2d regiment of Virginia volunteers. Since its organization in April, 1861, it has lost no less than three field officers. The first Lieutenant-Colonel, Luckland, who distinguished himself at the battle of Manassas, died a short time after that engagement from disease augmented by exposure; the second Colonel, J. W. Allen, who fought gallantly under Jackson in the Valley, was killed on the field in the fight at Gaines's Mill, on Fridays the 27th; and the third, Major Francis B. Jones, received a mortal wound in the same engagement. Major Jones was brought to this city on the day succeeding the fight, where he has since lingered until Wednesday last, when his sufferings were terminated in death. Major J. was a native of Frederick county, and a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, and though of a delicate constitution, was among the first to offer his services to the Confederacy after the war broke out. The 2d is o
oes no seem to be any ground to apprehend that the Southern Capital will again be menaced for some time to come. In the mean time no one doubts that our army will be placed upon the most effective footing, ready not only to repel the invader, but to carry the war to their own homes. The enemy's Movements. Lafayette has been received that the enemy's Stray in the Valley of Virginia has moved forward on Flout Hill, in Rappahannock, county, and there found a junction with a portion of McDowell's The number of men now at that point is imated at eighteen thousand. By adopting Rappahannock county as a base of operation, the enemy may throw a force into Page. Shenandoah, and Rockingham, and at the same time keep an eye upon any movement that might have for its object the clearing out of the Valley. The rout of Banks, Shields, and Fremont, by Jackson's army, has proved a bitter dose to Yankeeism, and every possible resource will be exhausted with a view to wipe out the painful rec
and every possible resource will be exhausted with a view to wipe out the painful recollection of that event. The Affair at Walkerton. We have received some further particulars of the attack upon a marauding party of Yankees at Walkerton, King and Queen county, on Tuesday last. It appears that the party was sent up to capture a wagon load of bacon and burn a lighter; but on arriving at the landing the vessel could not be found, and her owner remarked that he had sent her down the river to prevent him from mounting his horse and leaving the premises. Meanwhile some citizens outside got into a fight with the Yankee soldiers, one of whom was killed, and the others field. The lieutenant was subsequently fired upon by a citizen of King and Queen, who encountered him in the road, and seriously wounded. The whole party of eight finally surrendered, and were brought to Richmond. A Federal gunboat was in the Mattaponi river, seven miles from its mouth, on the same day, and it is a
Shenandoah (search for this): article 1
the most effective footing, ready not only to repel the invader, but to carry the war to their own homes. The enemy's Movements. Lafayette has been received that the enemy's Stray in the Valley of Virginia has moved forward on Flout Hill, in Rappahannock, county, and there found a junction with a portion of McDowell's The number of men now at that point is imated at eighteen thousand. By adopting Rappahannock county as a base of operation, the enemy may throw a force into Page. Shenandoah, and Rockingham, and at the same time keep an eye upon any movement that might have for its object the clearing out of the Valley. The rout of Banks, Shields, and Fremont, by Jackson's army, has proved a bitter dose to Yankeeism, and every possible resource will be exhausted with a view to wipe out the painful recollection of that event. The Affair at Walkerton. We have received some further particulars of the attack upon a marauding party of Yankees at Walkerton, King and Queen
ant dead. Perhaps no regiment in the Confederate service has sustained a greater loss in officers since its entrance into service than the 2d regiment of Virginia volunteers. Since its organization in April, 1861, it has lost no less than three field officers. The first Lieutenant-Colonel, Luckland, who distinguished himself at the battle of Manassas, died a short time after that engagement from disease augmented by exposure; the second Colonel, J. W. Allen, who fought gallantly under Jackson in the Valley, was killed on the field in the fight at Gaines's Mill, on Fridays the 27th; and the third, Major Francis B. Jones, received a mortal wound in the same engagement. Major Jones was brought to this city on the day succeeding the fight, where he has since lingered until Wednesday last, when his sufferings were terminated in death. Major J. was a native of Frederick county, and a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, and though of a delicate constitution, was among the fi
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