hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 44 0 Browse Search
Sebastapol (Mississippi, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
William S. Plumer 9 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 8 0 Browse Search
Jackson 7 1 Browse Search
Burnside 7 1 Browse Search
Couch 6 2 Browse Search
Twymans Mill (Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Winney Morton 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 11, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 141 total hits in 66 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Beaver Dam (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 5
is immense. One thing is certain, but little has fallen into the enemy's hands. I close to ride back to the rear — now our front. Summing up. I shall have to hurry on to the result. Our loss, of yesterday may be estimated at 6,000. Many of these are prisoners. The Pennsylvania reserve were again in the thickest. This morning they do not muster 3,000 men. Add to these 1,000 who are stragglers and will yet come in, and the number is less than half that they began with at Beaver Dam. They lost severely there, they were more than decimated the next day at Guines's Mills, and yesterday they shrank to this small measure. Their leader, General McCall, is severely wounded and in the enemy's hands. Our brigade Commander, General J. J. Reynolds, is a prisoner at Richmond; another General, George G. Meade, lies in a tent near us, seriously wounded. Officers of low grade they have lost in about the same proportion. Of the Bucktail regiment not a hundred respond to the rol
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
nt, bloody picture of war in its most terrible features. It was determined to move on during the night. The distance to Turkey Island Bridge, the point on James river which was to be reached, by the direct road, was six miles. But those vast numbers could not move over one narrow road in days; hence every by road, no matter aer. He tells us that "the enemy is in large force on the east side of the Chickahominy, and threatens not only McClellan's right wing but the navigation of the James river. The construction of batteries so as to intercept the navigation of the river would be laying direct siege to McClellan's position, and would place his army in of our wounded soldiers. They were brought a mile away, when the rebels compelled us to return them to the hospital where we found them. All quiet on the James river. From Gen. Burnside. The following letter, dated Newbern, N. C., July 2d, is published in the Philadelphia Press: Burnside's entire corps d'armee
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
n furlough have reported at Camp Chase. More are reporting every day. Indiana--Indianapolis, July 8.--Governor Morton's call for eleven additional regiments and six batteries of artillery, although only published yesterday morning, has been responded to in the most hearty and confident manner. From over thirty counties, military organizations have responded to the call. From Fortress Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8. --A flag of truce returned to-day from a cruise up the York river. At Cumberland were found 90 of our wounded soldiers. They were brought a mile away, when the rebels compelled us to return them to the hospital where we found them. All quiet on the James river. From Gen. Burnside. The following letter, dated Newbern, N. C., July 2d, is published in the Philadelphia Press: Burnside's entire corps d'armee is in motion, bound inland somewhere. Your readers will be surprised to hear that three divisions are now in motion from this place
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
onal regiments and six batteries of artillery, although only published yesterday morning, has been responded to in the most hearty and confident manner. From over thirty counties, military organizations have responded to the call. From Fortress Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8. --A flag of truce returned to-day from a cruise up the York river. At Cumberland were found 90 of our wounded soldiers. They were brought a mile away, when the rebels compelled us to return them to the hosFortress Monroe, July 8. --A flag of truce returned to-day from a cruise up the York river. At Cumberland were found 90 of our wounded soldiers. They were brought a mile away, when the rebels compelled us to return them to the hospital where we found them. All quiet on the James river. From Gen. Burnside. The following letter, dated Newbern, N. C., July 2d, is published in the Philadelphia Press: Burnside's entire corps d'armee is in motion, bound inland somewhere. Your readers will be surprised to hear that three divisions are now in motion from this place, and more to come. You will hear good news from Burnside, Parke, Foster, and Reno very soon. The troops are overjoyed to think that they are ab
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): article 5
ore. Gen. Marcy's estimate of M'Clellan's loss in the recent battles.[correspondence of the New York Tribune.] I understand that Gen. Marcy, Chief of McClellan's staff, estimates the entire loss of McClellan's army at $30,000. A Federal wagon train was attacked by a small hand of Confederate guerrillas, near Flint Hill, Va, on Monday. A panic among the teamsters ensued, but subsequently the Confederates were driven off. Senator Dixon left Washington city on Monday, for Connecticut, to raise a regiment of troops. About 1,600 rebel prisoners are now confined in the islands in New York harbor. Feeling in New York. A letter in the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated July 5, says: There are thousands of sorrowing hearts beating with painful suspense, as the long lists of killed, wounded, and missing, which are now beginning to find their way into the newspapers, give no sign of the fate of loved ones who are known to have been in the regiments most holy eng
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 5
rs' baggage and soldiers' knapsacks, were destroyed, and at every halting place since, the fagot has been busy with whatever could be transported no further. I can form no estimate of the entire value, but it is immense. One thing is certain, but little has fallen into the enemy's hands. I close to ride back to the rear — now our front. Summing up. I shall have to hurry on to the result. Our loss, of yesterday may be estimated at 6,000. Many of these are prisoners. The Pennsylvania reserve were again in the thickest. This morning they do not muster 3,000 men. Add to these 1,000 who are stragglers and will yet come in, and the number is less than half that they began with at Beaver Dam. They lost severely there, they were more than decimated the next day at Guines's Mills, and yesterday they shrank to this small measure. Their leader, General McCall, is severely wounded and in the enemy's hands. Our brigade Commander, General J. J. Reynolds, is a prisoner at Rich
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
One day later from the North.Federal account of Tuesday's battle.graphic description of the Federal retreat.&c., &c., &c. Through the kind attention of a friend we have received the Baltimore Sun, of the 9th inst. We make the following extracts: Account of the battle of Malvern Hill. A correspondent of the New York Post furnishes an interesting account of the battle of Tuesday, 1st instant, at "Malvern Hill." From the Post's account we make the subjoined extracts: At one o'clock the rebels came up in solid phalanxes and pressed forward towards the guns, supported by column after column, as far as the eye could reach, and presenting one of the most fearful as well as interesting sights imaginable. For some miles around, with the exception of a point on the left, the country is almost entirely clear of forest, and one of the largest and most beautiful estates extend, over which the eye sweeps at pleasure. The fearful havoc of the rapidly-bursting shells, from gun
Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
my has most unbounded reliance in their young commander, and dream of nothing out victory under his direction. Responses of the States. Ohio.--Cincinnati, July 8. --The new Ohio regiments will commence recruiting immediately, and camps are being established in different parts of the State for their reception. Recruiting has materially improved within the last few days, and over 500 privates on furlough have reported at Camp Chase. More are reporting every day. Indiana--Indianapolis, July 8.--Governor Morton's call for eleven additional regiments and six batteries of artillery, although only published yesterday morning, has been responded to in the most hearty and confident manner. From over thirty counties, military organizations have responded to the call. From Fortress Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8. --A flag of truce returned to-day from a cruise up the York river. At Cumberland were found 90 of our wounded soldiers. They were brought a mile away
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
earty and confident manner. From over thirty counties, military organizations have responded to the call. From Fortress Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8. --A flag of truce returned to-day from a cruise up the York river. At Cumberland were found 90 of our wounded soldiers. They were brought a mile away, when the rebels compelled us to return them to the hospital where we found them. All quiet on the James river. From Gen. Burnside. The following letter, dated Newbern, N. C., July 2d, is published in the Philadelphia Press: Burnside's entire corps d'armee is in motion, bound inland somewhere. Your readers will be surprised to hear that three divisions are now in motion from this place, and more to come. You will hear good news from Burnside, Parke, Foster, and Reno very soon. The troops are overjoyed to think that they are about to follow our gallant Burnside into a victorious field once more. Gen. Marcy's estimate of M'Clellan's loss in the rec
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 5
nto a victorious field once more. Gen. Marcy's estimate of M'Clellan's loss in the recent battles.[correspondence of the New York Tribune.] I understand that Gen. Marcy, Chief of McClellan's staff, estimates the entire loss of McClellan's army at $30,000. A Federal wagon train was attacked by a small hand of Confederate guerrillas, near Flint Hill, Va, on Monday. A panic among the teamsters ensued, but subsequently the Confederates were driven off. Senator Dixon left Washington city on Monday, for Connecticut, to raise a regiment of troops. About 1,600 rebel prisoners are now confined in the islands in New York harbor. Feeling in New York. A letter in the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated July 5, says: There are thousands of sorrowing hearts beating with painful suspense, as the long lists of killed, wounded, and missing, which are now beginning to find their way into the newspapers, give no sign of the fate of loved ones who are known to have been i
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...