hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Farr 20 0 Browse Search
Robert Lee 16 0 Browse Search
Richmond Morgan 12 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
White 7 1 Browse Search
City Point (Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Caesaraugusta (Spain) 6 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 6 0 Browse Search
Catholics 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 17, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 71 total hits in 37 results.

1 2 3 4
United States (United States) (search for this): article 12
torious criminals a few hours after their conviction. Several of the most violent and rabid secesh women in the city, who had been sentenced to thirty days imprisonment by Judge Hughes for the most unwarranted and unprovoked insults to Union people, have been released by Judge Peabody after about seven days confinement. Major Carr, of the New York has been "relieved from all blame, " without any inquiry, in the Opera-House affair, although "it is to be regretted he pulled down the United States flag." The order of the Provost Marshal regarding the departure of registered enemies says they will "be allowed to take provisions for ten days." I don't know how the amount was determined, but this I do know: Either the days must have been considered as arctic, when the sun is above the horizon for six months, or else the appetites have been reckoned as elephantine, for I know of one case where a small family were allowed two casks of hams and ten barrels of flour, besides a numbe
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 12
, too, when a large market is cut off, not only at the South, but to a considerable extent in other sections. Yet the retail dry goods stores, the large jewelry establishments, and fancy stores generally, are crowded with customers. The streets display a rainbow like splendor of magnificent, dresses, which literally sweep the pavements. Balls, weddings and parties are gotten up regardless of expense, and in their splendid appointments surpass those of the most prosperous times of peace. Newport and Saratoga, thus early, are beginning to fill, and the season at the watering places promises to exceed all previous ones in extravagance, in gaiety and display. A gentleman lately at the North, while in New York went into one of the largest jewelry stores on Broadway. That well-known house had added to its usual business an extensive military goods store, furnishing everything from swords to shoulder straps. "I suppose," said the gentleman, "that in these depressing times your mili
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 12
even a want of the necessities of life, may well be amazed at the abundance and prosperity not only "evident," but actually arising from and produced by war." These things have amazed many persons besides "the two daughters of John Bell, of Tennessee," They have amazed New York, Boston, and Philadelphia editors, engaged from day to day in chronicling the extravagance of Shoddymites, who are purchasing diamonds by the pint almost, and who are offering Church and Bierstadt thousands of dollary are, are actually nothing in comparison with our regular business, particularly in plate and diamonds. We are supplying contractors, their wives, and sons and daughters." Persons who may have arrived recently from the moon, or even from Tennessee, and who are verdant enough to suppose that a protracted war must necessarily almost drain the entire resources of the people to carry on the war itself, may well be "amazed" to find that it is only with many a source of unbounded wealth — that
Venice (Italy) (search for this): article 12
h men, so numerous that they are prominent in the Northern cities as the leading buyers of real estate, pictures, horses, fine furniture, diamonds, plate, and all that is necessary to furnish out a new sprung aristocracy, and who are notorious for extravagances which astonish old millionaires who were years in accumulating wealth which, is now heaped up in a few months or even weeks. To the student of history, however, there is nothing new, nothing amazing in these things. It was so in Venice, in old Rome, and the same sumptuous splendor, desire for display, and reckless extravagance, distinguished other cities, which are now remembered and remarkable for what they were once, rather than for what they are to-day. An Invitation accepted. The following "hit" at the peace party of the North is taken from the New York Times The frank and cordial manner in which our Southern brethren are responding to the offer of the Ohio Democrats, to "cooperate with them in the restor
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 12
to work enlisting negroes in earnest, and is recruiting them fact. But you will not rejoice to hear, from a card which he has published, that there are officers here who undertake to put themselves in opposition to the purpose of the Government in arming negroes. An officer engaged in recruiting negroes under Gen. Uilman has been arrested, and the negroes spirited away. The condition of the slaves Working under Yankee rule — their wages. We have conversed with a gentleman from Louisiana whose slaves were taken from him and pout to work on a plantation some distance off. He was permitted to go among them once after they were taken away, and was told by them of their situation. Their wages were $2 per month for good field hands, which was invariably swallowed up by the fines imposed on them by the Yankee masters. What they received for clothing was generally swindled out of them by the Yankee sutler of the "post," who would make a complaint to the commandant if any of the
Ohio (United States) (search for this): article 12
live in peace and harmony with them and of our willingness to do anything under heaven to keep them in good humor, our readers will, we think, agree with us that we might find better persons to represent us than the State militia. The men for this work are unquestionably the peace promoters. We think Mr. Fernando Wood and Dr. Brandford, and as large a portion of the recent great gathering at the Cooper Institute as can get away, ought to hurry on as fast as possible to the seat of peace. The Ohio democracy ought also to send forward as large as number of their leading orators and writers as they can spare, and we would suggest that Mr. Vallandigham ought to head the list. Mr. Lincoln cannot in decency refuse to grant him permission to return for this great occasion. We may remark, however, that the Southern delegates are all bringing muskets with them, and several rounds of ball cartridge. This, we presume, is partly for target practice in the intervals of the sittings of the Con
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 12
to adopt the customs of those great European aristocracies whose confreres and successors they believe themselves to be, and amongst others that of Poland, which always assembled in the National Diet with lance and sabre, and on horseback. We can not, although our pretensions are much more moderate, refuse to follow their example. There is already a good deal of intriguing, we are sorry to say as to who is to preside at the Convention. Robert Lee, of Virginia, and Joseph Hooker, of California, are both talked of, and both are manœavring with all their might in aid of their respective claims. Ewell has come on already to canvass for Lee, and his appearance has led to a good deal of wire pulling; but we doubt if anything decisive will take place before the appearance of Wood and Judge McCunn upon the scene. We hardly think it likely that the Constitution will open before these two great apostles of peace are ready to take part in it; though it these days it is dangerous to coun
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 12
dor of magnificent, dresses, which literally sweep the pavements. Balls, weddings and parties are gotten up regardless of expense, and in their splendid appointments surpass those of the most prosperous times of peace. Newport and Saratoga, thus early, are beginning to fill, and the season at the watering places promises to exceed all previous ones in extravagance, in gaiety and display. A gentleman lately at the North, while in New York went into one of the largest jewelry stores on Broadway. That well-known house had added to its usual business an extensive military goods store, furnishing everything from swords to shoulder straps. "I suppose," said the gentleman, "that in these depressing times your military business has in some degree lessened your losses by the nonsale of articles in your jewelry store." "On the contrary," was the reply, "our sales of military goods, large as they are, are actually nothing in comparison with our regular business, particularly in plate and
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 12
do it, if the "firmer measures" he calls so loudly for are not initiated. He says: One of the great merits of Gen. Butler's rule here was, that if he issued an order it was a settled thing; there was no getting away from it; if he said Ship Island, Ship Island it was. But this putting out a peremptory order, and a few days after qualifying it, excepting some, is no way to win the respect of either loyal or rebel. I have before mentioned the course of Judge Peabody here. One of theShip Island it was. But this putting out a peremptory order, and a few days after qualifying it, excepting some, is no way to win the respect of either loyal or rebel. I have before mentioned the course of Judge Peabody here. One of the latest causes is worthy of some of the New York Aldermen a few years ago, who used to release notorious criminals a few hours after their conviction. Several of the most violent and rabid secesh women in the city, who had been sentenced to thirty days imprisonment by Judge Hughes for the most unwarranted and unprovoked insults to Union people, have been released by Judge Peabody after about seven days confinement. Major Carr, of the New York has been "relieved from all blame, " without
Robert Lee (search for this): article 12
more moderate, refuse to follow their example. There is already a good deal of intriguing, we are sorry to say as to who is to preside at the Convention. Robert Lee, of Virginia, and Joseph Hooker, of California, are both talked of, and both are manœavring with all their might in aid of their respective claims. Ewell has come on already to canvass for Lee, and his appearance has led to a good deal of wire pulling; but we doubt if anything decisive will take place before the appearance of Wood and Judge McCunn upon the scene. We hardly think it likely that the Constitution will open before these two great apostles of peace are ready to take part in it; though it these days it is dangerous to count upon either the modesty or scrupulousness of such notorious intriguers as both Hooker and Lee. The New Yankee currency. The designs for the new "national" currency or the Yankee Government are out. It is painful to see that in the vignettes the irrepressible nigger is entire
1 2 3 4