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Perryville, Perry County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 15
hrown himself between him and Jackson. Had he done so, Johnston is army would have been cut off and lost. It was to prevent this that the latter made a forced march to Jackson. Grant's slow movement enabled him to reach the position and rest two days before the enemy arrived. Can Gen. Johnston hold the position? It is the opinion of some officers who know the ground that he can. On the other hand, it is a matter almost of life and death to the enemy to take it. As at the battle of Parryville, he is fighting for water, and if he is repulsed, and is forced to retire over the road which he came, it is difficult to perceive how he can escape perishing. Let us hope for the best, and pray God to vouchsafe us a victory at so important a point. It does not yet appear whether Grant is in person before Jackson, nor in what force the enemy are. Perhaps before these lines are in print, all these points will be cleared up. An officer down the Mobile and Ohio Road reports that twenty
Giat Grant (search for this): article 15
on the 3d instant, between 4 and 6 o'clock P. M. It is stated that Grant had made preparations for a grand assault on the next day. From thenday night he received information that Vicksburg had fallen, and Giat Grant was on the opposite bank to dispute the passage of the river. Heon reached General Johnston, then in bivouac on the Big Black.--Had Grant been the enterprising General he has the credit for, it was in his as to prevent this that the latter made a forced march to Jackson. Grant's slow movement enabled him to reach the position and rest two days a victory at so important a point. It does not yet appear whether Grant is in person before Jackson, nor in what force the enemy are. Perhaile and Ohio Road reports that twenty transports, with a portion of Grant's troops, west up the Mississippi after the fall of Vicksburg. its way to take the place of a regiment doing out post duty, one of Grant's masked batteries of four pieces was opened on it. Within a few mi
T. J. Jackson (search for this): article 15
at the news of the capitulation reached General Johnston, then in bivouac on the Big Black.--Had Grant been the enterprising General he has the credit for, it was in his power, easily, to have flanked Johnston, and thrown himself between him and Jackson. Had he done so, Johnston is army would have been cut off and lost. It was to prevent this that the latter made a forced march to Jackson. Grant's slow movement enabled him to reach the position and rest two days before the enemy arrived. to retire over the road which he came, it is difficult to perceive how he can escape perishing. Let us hope for the best, and pray God to vouchsafe us a victory at so important a point. It does not yet appear whether Grant is in person before Jackson, nor in what force the enemy are. Perhaps before these lines are in print, all these points will be cleared up. An officer down the Mobile and Ohio Road reports that twenty transports, with a portion of Grant's troops, west up the Mississip
urned away and wept like children at the sight of the banners they had followed so long and so well, doomed never again to flutter above them, the ensign of freedom and hatred tyranny. Gen. Johnston had reached the Big. Black, and would have crossed at daylight on Monday morning, but at 10 o'clock Sunday night he received information that Vicksburg had fallen, and Giat Grant was on the opposite bank to dispute the passage of the river. He immediately fell back to--,closely pursued by Sherman's corps, who were constantly skirmishing with our cavalry. I was not until late on Monday night that the news of the capitulation reached General Johnston, then in bivouac on the Big Black.--Had Grant been the enterprising General he has the credit for, it was in his power, easily, to have flanked Johnston, and thrown himself between him and Jackson. Had he done so, Johnston is army would have been cut off and lost. It was to prevent this that the latter made a forced march to Jackso
gain to flutter above them, the ensign of freedom and hatred tyranny. Gen. Johnston had reached the Big. Black, and would have crossed at daylight on Monday mos not until late on Monday night that the news of the capitulation reached General Johnston, then in bivouac on the Big Black.--Had Grant been the enterprising General he has the credit for, it was in his power, easily, to have flanked Johnston, and thrown himself between him and Jackson. Had he done so, Johnston is army would haJohnston is army would have been cut off and lost. It was to prevent this that the latter made a forced march to Jackson. Grant's slow movement enabled him to reach the position and rest two days before the enemy arrived. Can Gen. Johnston hold the position? It is the opinion of some officers who know the ground that he can. On the other hand, ite cannon and brought them safely into our lines. This is the sort of man beat Johnston has under his command. They may be starved, but not whipped. The wildest
The full of Vicksburg — additional particulars. Vicksburg did not surrender on the 4th of July. The garrison espitulated on the 3d instant, between 4 and 6 o'clock P. M. It is stated that Grant had made preparations for a grand assault on the next day. From the Jackson (Miss) correspondent of the Mobile papers, we have the following accounts: I have conversed with some of the officers who have come out, and they say that when the men rose from the trenches, where they had been for thirty-eight days, without ever being relieved, and marched out to stack their arms, one third of them reeled and staggered like drunken men from famine and exhaustion, and many of them fall to the ground unable to rise against, but when the guns were stacked, and the color-bearers marched up to lay their tattered and worn banners upon the slack, then, and not till then, did they seem to know and feel that all that they had struggled and suffered for for many long and dreary days and weeks was los
April, 7 AD (search for this): article 15
The full of Vicksburg — additional particulars. Vicksburg did not surrender on the 4th of July. The garrison espitulated on the 3d instant, between 4 and 6 o'clock P. M. It is stated that Grant had made preparations for a grand assault on the next day. From the Jackson (Miss) correspondent of the Mobile papers, we have the following accounts: I have conversed with some of the officers who have come out, and they say that when the men rose from the trenches, where they had been for thirty-eight days, without ever being relieved, and marched out to stack their arms, one third of them reeled and staggered like drunken men from famine and exhaustion, and many of them fall to the ground unable to rise against, but when the guns were stacked, and the color-bearers marched up to lay their tattered and worn banners upon the slack, then, and not till then, did they seem to know and feel that all that they had struggled and suffered for for many long and dreary days and weeks was los