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York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
and far more ominous of evil. It occupied four hours in passing, and moved so slowly through the Cashtown Gen. (in the South Mountain) that Longstreet's corps was delayed until near midnight appoint four miles distant from the battle ground Pender's and Heth's divisions alone were in position to engage the enemy's column on the morning of the 1st. Early's and Rodes's divisions of Ewell's corps arrived on the ground late in the afternoon, having marched down the Susquehanna from Carlisle to York, and thence to Gettysburg. These two last divisions joined the former, and together they drove the enemy back, inflicting heavy loss; but Anderson's and Johnson's divisions, though near enough, were not put into the fight that evening. The enemy had, according to the statements of prisoners, three army corps present on the 1st, and that night and early next morning the remainder of Meade's forces were brought up and put in a very strong position. We did not press the enemy after nightfall.
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
disposed of the army, he could then march wherever and whenever it suited him. The question then recurs, whether the distribution of his troops at different and distant points was not unfortunate, in this that it required more time to concentrate them when the time of battle had arrived. It was a singular dispersion of his forces, after much hard fighting and marching, that prevented him from beating McClellan at Sharpsburg last year. His object then was the capture of the garrison at Harper's Ferry, in which he was successful. In the present instance it was his desire, doubtless, to place his army at convenient points for procuring subsistence, secure his flanks against attack by cutting such railway lines as might be used against him, and to draw the enemy as far into the interior of the country as possible. But let us proceed. Were we compelled to accept battle at the time and place we did? We were not. Having the start of the enemy from Fredericksburg, and the whole coun
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
which rested upon a mountain, McLaws and Hood, of Longstreet's corps, were ordered to turn, and many believe, if other parts of the line had been assaulted at the same time, that Meade, strong as his position was, would have been beaten. No effort was made to turn his right wing, which rested upon open and less difficult ground. On the 3d, Pickett's division of Longstreet's corps, (which had come up the evening before,) supported by a portion of Hill's corps, was ordered to assault Cemetery Hill, near the centre, believed to be the key to the position of the enemy. The was executed in gallant style, and some of the batteries on the hill were carried; but his success was temporary, though purchased at a fearful cost. The want of proper support, the movement of the enemy upon his exposed and bleeding flanks, and the terrible cross and obliques fires concentrated upon him from batteries not otherwise occupied, made it necessary for him to retrace his steps across the open ground
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
seen, and contains many facts not before published. It is written two weeks after the conclusion of the fights, and the writer had ample time in which to examine the facts he states. He says: No one with that part of the army left near Chambersburg suspected, on the morning of the 1st inst., that the great battle would begin on that day. I was sitting on the wet ground, with my back against a tree, writing to you and your readers, when General Lee and his escort passed by in the direction the same road, followed an hour or two later by Johnson's division, of Ewell's corps, which had retraced its steps from Shippensburg. In the course of the morning orders came for Longstreet's corps, except Pickett's division, left behind at Chambersburg, to follow on in the same direction, as soon as General Ewell's train, sent back from Carline, should pass — This was an immense train, as long almost as the tail of a comet, and far more ominous of evil. It occupied four hours in passing, an
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 14
federates, therefore, though made with the greatest valor, and successful up to a certain point, failed to dislodge the enemy from his strong position. It is but simple justice to add that in no single instance that now occurs to me did our troops retire except under orders; nor did the enemy ever make the least attempt at pursuit. They advanced and withdrew-alike under orders, and that, too, in face of a fire far more furious than that which greeted the advancing columns of the French at Waterloo. In no sense of the word were they beaten. All that can be justly claimed by the enemy is that he maintained his ground against our assaults, though at a fearful cost of life and limb. This much, with the advantages he possessed in numbers and position, he ought to have done. If our position at Fredericksburg was such as to make Gen. Lee's army equal to a force of 300,000 men, as Gen. Longstreet is reported to have said it was, then Gen. Meade, who already had a superior force at Gettys
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 14
upon the militia so long as an unbeaten army remained in the field. Having disposed of the army, he could then march wherever and whenever it suited him. The question then recurs, whether the distribution of his troops at different and distant points was not unfortunate, in this that it required more time to concentrate them when the time of battle had arrived. It was a singular dispersion of his forces, after much hard fighting and marching, that prevented him from beating McClellan at Sharpsburg last year. His object then was the capture of the garrison at Harper's Ferry, in which he was successful. In the present instance it was his desire, doubtless, to place his army at convenient points for procuring subsistence, secure his flanks against attack by cutting such railway lines as might be used against him, and to draw the enemy as far into the interior of the country as possible. But let us proceed. Were we compelled to accept battle at the time and place we did? We wer
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
a comet, and far more ominous of evil. It occupied four hours in passing, and moved so slowly through the Cashtown Gen. (in the South Mountain) that Longstreet's corps was delayed until near midnight appoint four miles distant from the battle ground Pender's and Heth's divisions alone were in position to engage the enemy's column on the morning of the 1st. Early's and Rodes's divisions of Ewell's corps arrived on the ground late in the afternoon, having marched down the Susquehanna from Carlisle to York, and thence to Gettysburg. These two last divisions joined the former, and together they drove the enemy back, inflicting heavy loss; but Anderson's and Johnson's divisions, though near enough, were not put into the fight that evening. The enemy had, according to the statements of prisoners, three army corps present on the 1st, and that night and early next morning the remainder of Meade's forces were brought up and put in a very strong position. We did not press the enemy after
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
day. I was sitting on the wet ground, with my back against a tree, writing to you and your readers, when General Lee and his escort passed by in the direction of Cashtown and Gettysburg. He seemed to snuff the battle in the breeze, and for the first time it occurred to me that the enemy was approaching our lines. In a few minutericksburg, and the whole country before us, we might have chosen our own ground and time for making and receiving the attack. We might have occupied the pass at Cashtown, or remained on the north side of the South Mountain, or fallen down to Boonsboro' Gap-Having no base to protect, and no line of communication keep open, but rel Lee in the direction of Hagerstown, and Gen. Meade in the direction of Washington. All of our wounded who could be removed were sent back through the passes at Cashtown and Monterey Springs on Saturday, and that night and next morning the army followed, taking the road that crosses the South Mountain at Monterey Springs, and rea
Shippensburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
sitting on the wet ground, with my back against a tree, writing to you and your readers, when General Lee and his escort passed by in the direction of Cashtown and Gettysburg. He seemed to snuff the battle in the breeze, and for the first time it occurred to me that the enemy was approaching our lines. In a few minutes Anderson's division, of Hill's corps, marched down the same road, followed an hour or two later by Johnson's division, of Ewell's corps, which had retraced its steps from Shippensburg. In the course of the morning orders came for Longstreet's corps, except Pickett's division, left behind at Chambersburg, to follow on in the same direction, as soon as General Ewell's train, sent back from Carline, should pass — This was an immense train, as long almost as the tail of a comet, and far more ominous of evil. It occupied four hours in passing, and moved so slowly through the Cashtown Gen. (in the South Mountain) that Longstreet's corps was delayed until near midnight app
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
The Pennsylvania campaign. The army correspondent of the Savannah Republican, "R W. A," furnishes that paper with a resume of the Pennsylvania campaign, which is the fight frank, dispassionate history we have yet seen, and contains many facts not before published. It is written two weeks after the conclusion of the fights, and the writer had ample time in which to examine the facts he states. He says: No one with that part of the army left near Chambersburg suspected, on the morning of the 1st inst., that the great battle would begin on that day. I was sitting on the wet ground, with my back against a tree, writing to you and your readers, when General Lee and his escort passed by in the direction of Cashtown and Gettysburg. He seemed to snuff the battle in the breeze, and for the first time it occurred to me that the enemy was approaching our lines. In a few minutes Anderson's division, of Hill's corps, marched down the same road, followed an hour or two later by Johnso
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