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hting, and who would never permit their names to be given to the world, no matter how great their valor and self sacrifice. We had supposed that Admiral Porter was an honest fighting sailor, and not a dirty demagogue; but it seems we were mistaken. We should like to know if he ever heard of an army or a navy in which it was possible to publish all the names of the rank and file, and if so, why he, the aforesaid Admiral, has never published the names of the sailors under his command, or Grant those of the rank and file of his army? He must think the soldiers of the South are dolts and idiots. He don't know the men he is fighting against. They are not mercenaries and agrarians, but patriots, and many of them persons of education and wealth, who had a higher motive for taking up arms than to get their names in the news papers. They took up arms to deliver their country, not for glory and emolument. As to aristocracy, we have yet to see the country where an aristocracy does not
Bombshells and aristocracy. We see it stated that Admiral Porter, during the bombardment of Vicksburg, availed himself of the agency of bombshells to transmit a large number of handbills inside, addressed to the private soldiers of Vicksburg, endeavoring to excite their prejudices against their officers as aristocrat, who wol the fighting, and who would never permit their names to be given to the world, no matter how great their valor and self sacrifice. We had supposed that Admiral Porter was an honest fighting sailor, and not a dirty demagogue; but it seems we were mistaken. We should like to know if he ever heard of an army or a navy in whicstumbling over some of those mechanical callings which he professes to hold in such supreme contempt. From such aristocrats may the South long be delivered! Admiral Porter will have to send a good many more handbills before he can undermine the confidence which our rank and file have in their officers and the respect which they