hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 14 0 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 13 1 Browse Search
Morgan 10 2 Browse Search
Vallandigham 10 0 Browse Search
Charles Schwartz 8 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
John Buchanan 8 0 Browse Search
Isaac Jacobs 8 0 Browse Search
Meade 7 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 194 total hits in 130 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 5
sign that the rebellion shall have time afforded it to recover from the stunning blows it has recently received, we call for the evidence on which the News asserts that "Gov. Seymour has pledged his sacred word and honor" to the Copperhead rebellion proposed. To whom was this pledge made? What were its precise terms? A Slashing speech from an Ex-Northern Democrat--the Northwest Threatened with the Military — Vallandigham's opinion not worth much. Gen. John A. Logan, a well-known Illinois politician, recently returned home from Grant's army. On his arrival at Cairo he took occasion to express himself pretty freely to a circle of friends as to the troubles of the country. The speech was extremely wild. He advocated putting every man in the United States opposed to the war into the ranks, either to fight for or against the "Union." We copy some extracts from the address as reported in the Chicago Tribune: Every mother's son who is opposed to the war should be compelle
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
d in, and the substitutes provided for the conscripts in the service of the United States. The Daily News, approving an article in the New York Express, threaten enolized the Confederate Constitution as decidedly superior to that of the United States, and that he has expressed a strong desire that New York should adopt that try. The speech was extremely wild. He advocated putting every man in the United States opposed to the war into the ranks, either to fight for or against the "Unio existence of any authority of Government in America aside from that of the United States)--and has not met a man, woman, or child, who does not sustain the war, andmask more clearly to the people of Europe the slaveholding designs of the Confederate States as the only ground and motive of their rebellion — we nevertheless, utters and interests on the continent, and regarding any other overture to the Confederate States, except immediate and unconditional submission, to be equally uncalled fo
Pointe Coupee (La.) (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
pie, colonel, 511 men. 59th Tennessee, Wm L. Eaken, colonel, 394 men. 3d Tennessee, N J Lillard, colonel, 350 men. 31st Tennessee, W M Bradford, colonel, 455 men. 8th Louisiana heavy artillery, F N Ogden, major. 1st Louisiana heavy artillery, D Bettyhoover, lieutenant-colonel; 1st Tennessee heavy artillery, A Jackson colonel. Valden light artillery, S C Baird, captain. Appeal battery, R A Cotton, lieutenant. 2d Alabama light artillery, J R Scalar, lieutenant. Point Coupee artillery, W A Danielson, captain, 72 men. Tobin's Tennessee light artillery, T E Tobin, captain, 52 men. Sengstak's battery, H H Sengslak, captain, 99 men. Lowe's Missouri battery, J L Jackson, lieutenant, 62 men. 3d Missouri battery, company C, W E lieutenant, 64 men. 3d Missouri cavalry, Felix Loisperch, captain, 120 men. 12th Arkansas battalion, J L Bill, lieutenant, 52 men. 1st Arkansas battalion cavalry, J J Clark, 120 men. 1st Missouri cavalry, Geo W Law, lieut c
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 5
tery, company C, W E lieutenant, 64 men. 3d Missouri cavalry, Felix Loisperch, captain, 120 men. 12th Arkansas battalion, J L Bill, lieutenant, 52 men. 1st Arkansas battalion cavalry, J J Clark, 120 men. 1st Missouri cavalry, Geo W Law, lieut colonel, 230 men. 1st Missouri battery, Henry Guibor, captain, 53 men. Landis's battery, J C Landis, captain, 37 men. Walsh's battery, R C Walsh, lieutenant, 52 men. 1st Mississippi light artillery, Wm T Withers, colonel. Ward's. Mississippi light artillery, M S Ward, major, 185 men. Signal Corps, Max Danilson, captain. 1st Tennessee cavalry, R S Vandyke, captain, 59 men. City Guards, E B Martin, captain, 59 men. Cavalry Battery Guards, Ward's Texas Legion, J W Still, captain, 25 men. Smith's Partisan Rangers, J S Smith, captain, 40 men. Cherokee Artillery, M Van Der Corpunt, captain, 92 men. Botoute artillery, Alex Christ, captain 181 men. Signal Corps, C A King, captain, 22 men. Waddell's battery, J F Waddell,
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
t at the distance of 3,500 yards may be said to be equal to that of the united blows of 200 sledge hammers, weighing 100 pounds each, falling from a height of ten feet and acting upon a drill ten inches in diameter. The late Expedition up James river — the damage done by the torpedo. The New Bedford Standard publishes a letter from one of the crew of the steamer Commodore Barney, giving the following particulars of the late reconnaissance up James river: Last Monday we started up James river: Last Monday we started up the river with one monitor and one small tug, beside ourselves. We got within eleven miles of Fort Darling, when a crowd of sharpshooters fired on our three boats, and the way we poured the canister and shell into those woods was a caution. Well, we shut them up for a while, and went up within nine miles of Fort Darling, and the monitor anchored; but Gen. Hunter and his aids were on the monitor, and they came on board and wanted us to proceed further up the river; so we ventured, and when we
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
at he will be in readiness to open the grand assault on Thursday, the 13th instant. The Navy is all ready, waiting for the army, so that the fight, it is believed, will commence on that day. The greatest confidence is felt as to the result. The fall of Sumter, Wagner, and Cummings Point is regarded as certain to take place in from two to six hours after the ball opens. A deserter from Fort Wagner says that two thirds of the guns have been removed from Fort Sumter and mounted on James Island, and that the fall of Sumter is regarded by the rebels as a certainty, the damage done by the monitors in April last rendering the possibility of the rebels holding it not to be thought of. The deserter says that Sumter was on the point of surrendering at that time, when, fortunately for the rebels, the monitors withdrew. We have shelling night and day. Fort Johnson keeps up a brisk fire, and our wooden gunboats go in every day and amuse themselves by shelling them. At night the reb
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
d every minute they would be upon us. We were under a very high bluff and couldn't get our guns to bear at all. We were in a tight fix, and all that stopped them from coming on that hill was a long marsh that they couldn't cross. Finally, the tug came back and towed us off. When we got down to the monitor there was another tug there that had just come up the river. The tugs towed the monitor and she towed us behind. We came out of it first-rate; not a man was hurt. When we got down to Malvern Hill they opened an awful fire on us, the same way as the others did — sharpshooters to drive us away from our guns, then the shell and shot were terrible, raking us fore and aft. Remember we had no steam at all. They waited until the monitor got by, then they socked iron into us rough and ready, and we into them, when the sharpshooters stopped firing. We were completely riddled. One of our pilot houses is knocked to pieces, the captain's room is stove in, and the purser's office looks l
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 5
minds, and they will, almost to a man, demand a speedy termination of this war — would submit to almost anything rather than fight one day longer as they have been fighting. It is only by the force of bayonets that their army is kept together. Even that cannot prevent their deserters from flocking into Jackson by hundreds to take the oath of allegiance or to join the Union ranks. And I tell you what I know when I say that it will not be many days ere the entire States of Mississippi and Tennessee will be knocking loudly for re- admission to a Union which, not long since, they thought their puny efforts could quickly dissolve. They are talking of it even now. Speaking of being united, I tell you, by the eternal God, there was never a more truthful sentence than that of Douglas, "Those who are not with us are against us;" and I reiterate it, and add that those who are not with us should be hung, or should be with their Southern brethren, fighting with them. Let them either
Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 5
ell them in return. On Sunday next we will certainly hold Sumter, and to thin a few days after Charleston or its rains will be in our possession. Two more mortar schooners, making five in all, and the wooden gunboats are striping for the fight. The weather continues delightful, though there is great suffering for ice, lemons, and sugar. Cannot Boston, New York, or Philadelphia, send some cargoes here for the use of the gallant sailors and soldiers? As the Arago leaves, the Ottawa, Marblehead, Seneca, and Ironsides are engaged shelling the Cummings Point battery. The Washington Republican has a description of a 10-inch 300-pounder Parrott rifled gun about to be used against Fort Sumter. In explaining its breaching power it carries out a comparison with a 24-pounder siege gun, and says: A 24-pounder round shot, which starts with a velocity of 1,625 feet per second, strikes an object at the distance of 3,500 yards with a velocity of 300 feet per second. The 10-inch ri
Vallandigham (search for this): article 5
A Slashing speech from an Ex-Northern Democrat--the Northwest Threatened with the Military — Vallandigham's opinion not worth much. Gen. John A. Logan, a well-known Illinois politician, recently Then there would be no talk of peace here in the North, no talk of resistance, no such men as Vallandigham, no such cowards as those who support all such men and say these things. Vallandigham sVallandigham says he has travelled over the Confederacy — using the term "Confederacy"--not the phrase so-called Confederacy, (for I do not acknowledge the existence of any authority of Government in America aside ot sustain the war, and who is not determined to fight it out to the death or the bitter end. Vallandigham here simply . He tells what is not true, and he knows it. Vallandigham, aside from the leadinVallandigham, aside from the leading men.-- Jeff. Davis, Toombs, and Stephens — did not, I venture to say, speak with a dozen persons while taking his involuntary trip through Dixie. Had he done so, his report would have been of a dif<
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...