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Folly Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
ecome a famous harbor on the Carolina coast. The rebels, in looking from their observatory just below Fort Johnson, cannot be otherwise than astonished to witness the fleet of vessels of various kinds that are constantly anchored at that point. Perhaps they also witness with feelings of regret the wreck of the impudent Ruby, which was driven on the beach by the blockaders while attempting to run the gauntlet with a contraband cargo up Lighthouse creek. Communication between Morris and Folly Islands is kept up by means of a small steamer which hourly plays back and forth. In addition to the steamer, a dozen or more row-boats are always on one or the other shore, so there is never a lack of transportation. A flag of truce was sent to Fort Wagner yesterday, but no reply has been received up to the time of mailing this letter. In Gen. Gillmore's marquee are three elegant flags which have been captured on this island. Two belonged to the 21st South Carolina, one of the old a
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 5
. Ed. W. Smith, A. A. G. Israel Sealy, Captain 47th, N. Y. volunteers, acting Ass't Adj't Gen'l. From Port Royal — Contrabands must work. The New South, a Yankee paper published at Port Royal, gives a list of the deaths which have occurred in the hospitals at Beaufort and Port Royal from July 1st. It occupies nearly a column of the New York Times, and a great majority are from typhoid fever. Thirty- two died from wounds. The dead hailed chiefly from New York, Ohio, Maine, Pennsylvania and Connecticut. Among the list is the name of S. Pete, civilian and refugee, who died on July 4th, of chronic diarrhoea. The employees in the Quartermaster's department, who are chiefly negroes, have, it appears, threatened to strike for higher wages, and been in other ways mutinous, a state of things which has called forth the following "circular:" To the Employees of the Quartermaster's Department: There must not be the least holding back or want of interest, or willingnes
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
hin a mile and a half of Fort Wagner, not fearing any trouble from the guns of that work. Fort Gregg, otherwise known as the Cummings Point Battery, is completely out of the question at present. The special points of interest are Forts Sumter, Johnson, and, as before intimated, Fort Wagner. Let those forts be reduced and the land forces will have achieved all that can be required of them in their present situation. The iron clads must do the rest in the reduction of Charleston. Fort Moultrie occasionally throws a shell, but for what purpose it is difficult to conceive, as the projectile invariably falls in the water without causing the slightest damage to any Union material. Of the health of the Union troops it may be said that they are comparatively in a good condition. The cases of sickness have been greatly reduced during the past ten days, and the probability is, that in the course of another week the sick list will be very small. Those who are sick have the best
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 5
band had recently had their houses burned by Union soldiers. In Kansas the Sioux Indians are desperate, and no white person is safe. They have destroyed several steamers. The burning of the steamer Ruth, at Island No.1, is attributed to "rebel" incendiarism. Thirty lives were lost, including several paymasters, with $2,600,000 to pay off Grant's army, 120 mules, 1,000 tons of commissary stores, and 100 tons of private freight. The boat, valued at $100,000, is a total loss. The cavalry division sent by Rosecrans to Huntsville found nothing of value. Turchin has been removed. An effort was made by rebel emissaries to fire the naval depot at Cairo on the 5th. A Colonel and Captain, sent by Gov. Harris, with Roddy's command, to protect the elections in West Tennessee, were captured by Dodge, near Corinth, and their purpose defeated. Port Hudson is garrisoned mostly by negro troops. Gen. Payne, who lost a leg at Port Hudson, had arrived at Memphis.
Lighthouse Creek (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
tillery duel. Lighthouse Inlet has certainly become a famous harbor on the Carolina coast. The rebels, in looking from their observatory just below Fort Johnson, cannot be otherwise than astonished to witness the fleet of vessels of various kinds that are constantly anchored at that point. Perhaps they also witness with feelings of regret the wreck of the impudent Ruby, which was driven on the beach by the blockaders while attempting to run the gauntlet with a contraband cargo up Lighthouse creek. Communication between Morris and Folly Islands is kept up by means of a small steamer which hourly plays back and forth. In addition to the steamer, a dozen or more row-boats are always on one or the other shore, so there is never a lack of transportation. A flag of truce was sent to Fort Wagner yesterday, but no reply has been received up to the time of mailing this letter. In Gen. Gillmore's marquee are three elegant flags which have been captured on this island. Two bel
Pocotaligo (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
h hourly plays back and forth. In addition to the steamer, a dozen or more row-boats are always on one or the other shore, so there is never a lack of transportation. A flag of truce was sent to Fort Wagner yesterday, but no reply has been received up to the time of mailing this letter. In Gen. Gillmore's marquee are three elegant flags which have been captured on this island. Two belonged to the 21st South Carolina, one of the old and the other the new style. The old one has "Pocotaligo" inscribed on it, and was captured by private Poper Counslow, company D, 6th Connecticut, on the 10th ult., after shooting the rebel color-bearer. Military news to be Suppressed — a Stringent order. The following order has been issued by Gen. Gillmore relative to the press: Department of the South, Headq'rs in the Field, Morris Island, S. C., Aug. 7, 1863. General Orders, no. 66. I. The practice of giving information, to their friends or to the public press on
Orleans (New York, United States) (search for this): article 5
he fact that the draft is to commence in New York city on Monday next. An official report made by the Adjutant-General of the State to Governor Seymour, shows that New York city has furnished from the beginning of the war 33,623 men in excess of all her quotas, not counting 20,851 men sent by her on occasion of sudden peril for the defence of the Yankee capital. The Board of Enrollment in the New Bedford (Mass.) district out of 1,286 drafted men. "passed" into the U. S. army 121. The Orleans (N. Y.) Republican gives some incidents of the draft in that district. It says: The enrolling officers had put down the names of all that they could see or hear of, including the lame, blind, deaf, and dead. This swelled the enrollment list, and of course the quota to be drawn. Among the names put in the wheel for this town we noticed that of Geo. K. Mason, who died in the United States service nearly a year since, and W. A. Shelden, who has not resided in this town in four years.
Sag Harbor (New York, United States) (search for this): article 5
eek, but the excessive heat caused this gallant son of Mars to faint. He was speedily taken to the open air and recovered. Brig. Gen. Butterfield, wounded at Gettysburg, passed through Boston on Tuesday, en route from the White Hills to New York. Col. C. C. Doolittle, 18th Michigan volunteers, was, a few days since, presented with a silver tea-set by the subordinate officers of the regiment at Nashville, Tenn. Gen. McClellan, of the Yankee army, had a narrow escape from drowning at Sag Harbor the other day. James Tallmadge, a nephew of Rev. S. L. Mershon, of Easthampton, was drowned while bathing in the surf, and Major-Gen. George B. McClellan and several others, bathing at the same time, were in imminent peril from the heavy undertow. Hurlburt's latest order is that the penalty of banishment from Memphis will not be enforced upon widows and orphans, persons of either sex above 50 years of age, or persons dependent for their livelihood upon their actual daily labor. L
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 5
tionality" of the Conscription law, &c. The proceedings were cut short by one of the officers announcing that they had nothing to do about the law except to enforce it, and that they should take the prisoners by the boat about to leave, at the same time exhibiting a loaded revolver. The opposition at once subsided, and the deserters were brought away without further trouble. A strong, able bodied man attempted to get an exemption on the ground that he was under height, in one of the Rhode Island districts. But the doctor untied a peculiar twist in his back, and he at once grew two inches. One of the singular incidents of the conscription at Middleboro', N. H., was the drawing of two blind brothers, John and Joseph Haiton, of East Wareham. A substitute in the 1st Rhode-Island district gave his name as Samuel Bruns. On examination the letters B. C. were handsomely marked on his breast. When asked if his name was Samuel Burns what was the meaning of the above letters, w
Bloomfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 5
hew of Rev. S. L. Mershon, of Easthampton, was drowned while bathing in the surf, and Major-Gen. George B. McClellan and several others, bathing at the same time, were in imminent peril from the heavy undertow. Hurlburt's latest order is that the penalty of banishment from Memphis will not be enforced upon widows and orphans, persons of either sex above 50 years of age, or persons dependent for their livelihood upon their actual daily labor. Last Saturday twelve guerillas from Bloomfield, Mo., attacked a Government train of thirty wagons from Cape Girardeau, killed nine and wounded six drivers, destroying the entire train, capturing a supply of arms, taking off the horses, and escaping. The leaders of the band had recently had their houses burned by Union soldiers. In Kansas the Sioux Indians are desperate, and no white person is safe. They have destroyed several steamers. The burning of the steamer Ruth, at Island No.1, is attributed to "rebel" incendiarism. Th
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