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Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 6
ound in the pockets or houses of the citizens. They stole all the jewelry of the ladies, even to the rings on their fingers. The houses that remain standing are filled with the killed and wounded, who belong to all classes of society. No resistance was made to the guerillas. The people were shot down as they ran through the streets in their night-clothes, and their bodies thrown into wells and cisterns. Gen. Jim Lane escaped on horseback. Quantrell is now retreating towards Missouri, burning and laying waste everything in his route. The loss at Lawrence is not less than $2,000,000. Two banks were robbed of every dollar they had, and the third escaped a similar fate only because the heat was so great from the burning buildings, that the rebels could not stop long enough to get the safes open. Bombardment of Fort Sumter. The American's summary of its correspondence from Charleston, dated the 18th inst., is as follows: The attack on Fort Sumter was
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 6
f. Official copy — D. C. Wasser, A. A. G. A Proclamation of Rosecrans — the brutalities of the Federals. Gen. Rosecrans seems to be himself horrified at the brutalities of his own soldiers, and also to have an idea that he can conquer Tennessee with proclamations. He has just issued one of which the following is an extract: 1. Officers and soldiers of the army of the Cumberland: Some grave outrages and wrongs have been perpetrated on loyal citizens and harmless women, by latle of the locomotive screamed the signal of departure, and Buchanan was soon lost in the distance with the train. Gen. Boyle has issued an order for the impressment of 6,000 negro laborers from the frontier counties in Kentucky, for the purpose of building the great military road-through that State to East Tennessee. The draft was continued in New York city on the 24th in the 1st, 2d, and 3d districts. --There was no disorder. Gold sold in New York, on the 24th, as low as 123
United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
at if Captain H. W. Sawyer, 1st New Jersey volunteer cavalry, and Capt. John Flynn, 51st Indiana volunteers, or any other officers or men in the service of the United States, not guilty of crimes punishable with death by the laws of war, shall be executed by the enemy, the aforementioned prisoners will be immediately hung in retalie other rebel officer designated as herein above directed, and that you notify Robert Ould, Esq., of said proceedings and assure him that the Government of the United States will proceed to retaliate for every similar barbarous violation of the laws of civilized war. H. W. Hallech, General in-Chief. Official copy — D. C. Wassland permits the two iron-clad rams now building there for the rebels to be turned over to our enemies to depredate on American commerce, the Government of the United States will, accept the act as a declaration of war. This is certainly very important and startling, if true, and of the truth of the allegation the editor of the Rep
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
ate in the country. They are a fine, hearty-looking set of men, having been well fed by the Government since their capture. Colonel Tevis has seen considerable service in the United States Mounted Rifles. He also served in Turkey five years as Lieutenant-Colonel of cavalry, and was decorated for gallant conduct on the field of battle three times by the Ottoman Government. During the last year he was Lieutenant-Colonel of the 4th Delaware Volunteers, and led several expeditions from Yorktown, Virginia, in one of which he pushed as far as Aylett's Station with two hundred infantry. He was selected by Gen. Schenck to organize the 3d Maryland regiment, and has been detached from his old regiment by the Secretary of War for this express purpose. It may seem strange, indeed, to many that rebel prisoners are so willing to join the Union army. The fact must have a crushing effect upon the Northern peace men or rebel sympathizers. The prospect of a Yankee war with England. The P
Fall's Church (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
on of Winchester, did not reach the latter previous to the council of war composed of Gen. Milroy and his brigade commanders. Movements of Mosby. The waggish Mosby, with part of his gang, on Sunday night, encamped two and a half miles from Upton's Hill, almost within range of the guns on the Washington fortifications. On Sunday afternoon he stopped a funeral procession, on its way from Lewinsville to Washington, and stole the horses attached to the hearse. He afterwards visited Falls Church, and amused himself by taking observations of our new contraband farms. Miscellaneous. A dispatch from Memphis announced that Gen. Hurlbut had sent an expedition to Grenada, Miss., which drove the rebels out of the town and destroyed fifty-seven locomotives and over four hundred cars, belonging to the different Southern railroads concentrating at Jackson. Ex-President Buchanan and suite, en route from Bedford Springs to Wheatland, passed through Harrisburg on Saturday last.
Lawrence, Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): article 6
Latest from the North. New York and Baltimore papers, of the 25th inst., have been received. We subjoin a summary of the news: The destruction of Lawrence, Kansas. A telegram, dated Leavenworth, 22d, gives an account of the destruction of Lawrence, Kansas, by Quantrell's guerillas. It says: The list of killed Lawrence, Kansas, by Quantrell's guerillas. It says: The list of killed and wounded as far as ascertained is some 180, the majority of whom were killed instantly, most of them in their own houses, with their wives and children clinging to them, while the murderers planted pistols at their breasts and shot them down. Among the most prominent citizens known to be killed are Gen. G. W. Calmer, Mayons. Gen. Jim Lane escaped on horseback. Quantrell is now retreating towards Missouri, burning and laying waste everything in his route. The loss at Lawrence is not less than $2,000,000. Two banks were robbed of every dollar they had, and the third escaped a similar fate only because the heat was so great from th
Charles Carroll Tevis (search for this): article 6
een given, to the Provost Marshal General of the army, at the headquarters of the Department for record. By command of Maj.-Gen. Rosecrans. J. Bates Dickinson, A. A. G. A regiment of Traitors — the third Maryland cavalry. Col. Charles Carroll Tevis, a graduate of West Point in 1849, is now engaged in raising the 3d Maryland Cavalry. His recruiting officers are: Captain Gregory, Capt. Pemberton, Lieutenant Eakin, and Lieutenant Davis. Their station is at Fort Delaware. The Baltillegiance, six hundred have already enrolled themselves in the new regiment. Among them are men from almost every State in the country. They are a fine, hearty-looking set of men, having been well fed by the Government since their capture. Colonel Tevis has seen considerable service in the United States Mounted Rifles. He also served in Turkey five years as Lieutenant-Colonel of cavalry, and was decorated for gallant conduct on the field of battle three times by the Ottoman Government. Dur
John Flynn (search for this): article 6
low the rank of captain, prisoners of war, in close confinement and under strong guards, and that you notify Mr. R. Ould, Confederate agent for exchange of prisoners of war, that if Captain H. W. Sawyer, 1st New Jersey volunteer cavalry, and Capt. John Flynn, 51st Indiana volunteers, or any other officers or men in the service of the United States, not guilty of crimes punishable with death by the laws of war, shall be executed by the enemy, the aforementioned prisoners will be immediately hung in retaliation. It is also directed that immediately on receiving official or other authentic information of the execution of Captain Sawyer and Captain Flynn, you will proceed to hang General Lee and the other rebel officer designated as herein above directed, and that you notify Robert Ould, Esq., of said proceedings and assure him that the Government of the United States will proceed to retaliate for every similar barbarous violation of the laws of civilized war. H. W. Hallech, General
Q. A. Gillmore (search for this): article 6
enough to get the safes open. Bombardment of Fort Sumter. The American's summary of its correspondence from Charleston, dated the 18th inst., is as follows: The attack on Fort Sumter was commenced at daylight Monday morning by Gen. Gillmore's land batteries. Shortly afterwards the navy joined in the attack. Admiral Dahlgren went on board the monitor Weehawken, and the entire ironclad fleet, with seven wooden gunboats, furiously attacked Forts Wagner and Gregg, silencing both t, killing him instantly. Paymaster Woodbury, who was standing by his side, was also killed by the flying fragment. These were the only persons killed on our side during the six hours bombardment. The effect of the first day's fire from Gen. Gillmore's batteries on Sumter was very damaging. A false wall, which the rebels had erected to protect the gorge wall, which is exposed to the fire from the land batteries, was completely demolished, while the old wall was bored full of holes, the p
description of all persons so paroled by them, with their bonds, if any have been given, to the Provost Marshal General of the army, at the headquarters of the Department for record. By command of Maj.-Gen. Rosecrans. J. Bates Dickinson, A. A. G. A regiment of Traitors — the third Maryland cavalry. Col. Charles Carroll Tevis, a graduate of West Point in 1849, is now engaged in raising the 3d Maryland Cavalry. His recruiting officers are: Captain Gregory, Capt. Pemberton, Lieutenant Eakin, and Lieutenant Davis. Their station is at Fort Delaware. The Baltimore American says of this regiment: Of the many prisoners who have taken the oath of allegiance, six hundred have already enrolled themselves in the new regiment. Among them are men from almost every State in the country. They are a fine, hearty-looking set of men, having been well fed by the Government since their capture. Colonel Tevis has seen considerable service in the United States Mounted Rifles. He a
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