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Mobjack Bay (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
necessary to give the men a day of rest, and it was not until the 19th that we reached the Rappahannock. The boats were again launched in Meachum's Creek, just inside of Gray's Point, and about ten miles from the Chesapeake. Just at the mouth of the river is a small bay or cove, called Butler's Hole, in which the blockaders usually run at night for a safe anchorage.--The river is some three or four miles wide. Upon the opposite side is Stingray Point, from which the land runs down into Mobjack bay and the mouth of the Paintbank. There are two sets of blockaders here. Off the mouth of the latter mentioned river the steamers belong to the "North Atlantic Squadron, " while at the Rappahannock they are from the "Potomac Flotilla." They communicate with each other, however, and are near enough to signal at night with blue and red lights. At this time three steamers were off the Rappahannock — the Currituck, the Reliance, and the Satellite. One or all of these we were determined to h
Essex (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
nd was then some eighteen hours ahead of me, and I had to overtake them upon as sorry a piece of horseflesh as one could well imagine. That animal was nearly the death of me: he was somewhat rough and shook me until every joint in my body was loose and my teeth rattled in their sockets. Complaining did no good, and I determined to let no trials ruffle my good nature. By careful inquiry along the road I was enabled to trace the party across the Pamunkey, the Mattaponi at Mantua, on through Essex, half-way through the adjoining county. Towards evening of the third day I was fortunate enough to strike the trail, and in three hours after reached the end of my equestrian journey. That night we bivouacked on the Paintbank, some twenty-five miles from its month. The boats were in the water in readiness for sailing, while the men, secreted between two hills, lounged about upon the grass, or cooked their rations by the bivouac fire. Lt. Wood, the commander of the party, was off on a
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
The capture of gunboats on the Rappahannock. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Port Royal, Aug. 28, 1863. Some two weeks ago a party of seamen, armed to the teeth and accompanied by four splendid boats, left the city of Richmond on the Mechanicville road. Their destination was a matter of conjecture, and more than one anxious quidnunc puzzled his brain over the problem. The quickened imagination of a curious man soon works out a troublesome secret, and before half the day had elapsed I was regaled with a dozen different accounts, each of them undoubtedly correct. It may seem singular that when the Secretary of the Navy gave me orders to join the party he did not take me into his confidence, and I was therefore as ignorant about the matter as about the plans of Gen. Lee. I must confess, then, to a certain amount of interest in the stories confidentially whispered into my buttonhole, and I listened attentively to the recital of disasters about to befall me, and saw
Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 1
rrect. It may seem singular that when the Secretary of the Navy gave me orders to join the party he did not take me into his confidence, and I was therefore as ignorant about the matter as about the plans of Gen. Lee. I must confess, then, to a certain amount of interest in the stories confidentially whispered into my buttonhole, and I listened attentively to the recital of disasters about to befall me, and saw work marked out that would occupy several months, and finally consign me to Fort Delaware or to — somewhere else. --It was a cheerful prospect — but beyond a doubt. My orders came late in the day, when I was on liberty in the city, enjoying the luxury of leisure and white linen. I was to start at daylight in the morning, but, owing to the difficulty of obtaining a passport from the courteous officers of that delectable office on 9th st., I was delayed until meridian the following day. My command was then some eighteen hours ahead of me, and I had to overtake them upon as so
Mechanicville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
The capture of gunboats on the Rappahannock. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Port Royal, Aug. 28, 1863. Some two weeks ago a party of seamen, armed to the teeth and accompanied by four splendid boats, left the city of Richmond on the Mechanicville road. Their destination was a matter of conjecture, and more than one anxious quidnunc puzzled his brain over the problem. The quickened imagination of a curious man soon works out a troublesome secret, and before half the day had elapsed I was regaled with a dozen different accounts, each of them undoubtedly correct. It may seem singular that when the Secretary of the Navy gave me orders to join the party he did not take me into his confidence, and I was therefore as ignorant about the matter as about the plans of Gen. Lee. I must confess, then, to a certain amount of interest in the stories confidentially whispered into my buttonhole, and I listened attentively to the recital of disasters about to befall me, and sa
Stingray Point (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
orn out by hard marching and severe labor, it was necessary to give the men a day of rest, and it was not until the 19th that we reached the Rappahannock. The boats were again launched in Meachum's Creek, just inside of Gray's Point, and about ten miles from the Chesapeake. Just at the mouth of the river is a small bay or cove, called Butler's Hole, in which the blockaders usually run at night for a safe anchorage.--The river is some three or four miles wide. Upon the opposite side is Stingray Point, from which the land runs down into Mobjack bay and the mouth of the Paintbank. There are two sets of blockaders here. Off the mouth of the latter mentioned river the steamers belong to the "North Atlantic Squadron, " while at the Rappahannock they are from the "Potomac Flotilla." They communicate with each other, however, and are near enough to signal at night with blue and red lights. At this time three steamers were off the Rappahannock — the Currituck, the Reliance, and the Satell
Urbanna (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 1
t-house and blew the whistle to get help from the Satellite, but he was soon secured. --There was sharp firing on the decks, both with rifles and revolvers, during which Midshipman Cook, who was foremost in the fight, received a wound in the side, and one of the seamen was shot through the arm. Several wounded Yankees lay around the decks, and one negro was stiff in death. In fifteen minutes after the attack both vessels were secured, the prisoners were put in irons until they could be confined, and the wounded taken below. The new crew went to their work readily; the engineers got up steam, the firemen took their places, the pilot was at the wheel, the quartermaster on the deck, and the officers at their posts. Everything was made ready for sailing, the boats were hauled alongside, the anchor raised, and just as day was dawning the C. S. steamers Satellite and Reliance got under way and stood up the Rappahannock. About sunrise the anchors were dropped off Urbana. Bohemian.
histled with fury around our ears. Upon reaching Butler's Hole a flash of lightning showed the blockaders a short distance ahead, their black hulls rising from the water, some two or three hundred yards apart. The boats were now ranged alongside each other and the plan of attack made known. There being two of them, it became necessary to divide our forces, and consequently Lt. Wood, in the second cutter, and Lieut. Hudgins, in the first, were to attack one, while Lieut. Hoge and Midshipman Gardner, in the third and fourth cutters, were to take the other. Each man had a white badge around his arm to distinguish him from the enemy. Everything being in readiness, the four boats pulled towards the steamers in line of battle. I was in Mr. Wood's party, in the boat with Lieutenant Hudgins. We pulled slowly and silently on. When within about fifty yards the sentinel on deck sang out his "boat ahoy."--Mr. Wood answered in some unintelligible words, and then we gave way strong toward
quick as thought, twenty of us were climbing over the nettings upon her decks. The watch fired their rifles at us and gave the alarm, and immediately the Yankees came pouring from below, grasping cutlasses and side arms as they ran up the hatch. They fought well considering the circumstances, but it was of no avail; in a few minutes the vessel was ours and the crew had surrendered. Lt. Wood, followed by Midshipman-Goodwin, were first upon the decks upon their side, while Lt. Hudgins and Mr. Wilson led the way on ours. The whole was over almost with the rapidity of thought. Just as the decks were ours sharp firing was heard upon the Reliance. We watched for a moment, but not seeing the preconcerted signal, were anxious about the other party. Our boat was immediately manned, and we pulled over to his assistance; but Lieut. Hoge had done the work well before our arrival. He had met with more determined spirits, and had to encounter two or three deserters from our army, who fo
shot down, but was instantly replaced upon a shorter staff. The steamer also commenced shelling the woods, and the fire was kept up until the boats were in, when she, too, hastily retreated down the river. From the Philadelphia Inquirer, of the 20th, received since, we learned that the Yankee Captain, Hotchkiss, was killed, and several of the men wounded "by guerillas." We have ascertained also that the Yankees were ignorant of our presence, and came up the river to destroy the house of Mr. Jones, now a prisoner in the Old Capitol prison. On the way up, early in the morning, they had desolated the home of Mr. Hutchins, carrying off everything possible, and shooting his stock in the field. That evening we pulled up to our original starting point, and by dark had the boats again out of the water. When the wagons came they were put upon them, and we started across the country for a new scene of operations. Worn out by hard marching and severe labor, it was necessary to giv
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