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Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 8
ticles furnished him by the friends of any of our sufferers in Richmond. Of course nothing but articles of actual necessity should be sent, for they would hardly be delivered. Federal Espionage abroad — the case of Gen. Williams. Gen. Williams, of Baltimore, has been released from Port Lafayette. He has published a statement of the mode of his arrest, which shows the Yankee Consuls abroad to be little better than common spies for their Government. Gen. W. had spent the summer in Canada, with his niece, Mrs. Atwood, who accompanied him, and had determined to return to the United States. In his statement he says: Upon mentioning to friends in Quebec my intention, I was informed that they had heard of charges having been forwarded to Washington against me (of a treasonable nature) by Mr. Ogden, the United States Consul. I immediately sought an interview with Mr. Ogden, and asked him if he had ever heard me make use of treasonable language. He replied that he never ha
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 8
ender it unnecessary to use the troops under his command for that purpose. On the 20th of August Gov. Seymour wrote to Gen. Dix, complaining that he had received no notice of the time when the draft would be made in the city, owing to which he alleged, he had no opportunity to consult with the Generals commanding militia in the counties of New York and Kings, nor to obtain credits for volunteers, as he hoped to be able to do. Clothing for Yankee prisoners in Richmond. The Chambersburg (Pa.) Repository, of Wednesday, says: Dr. J. K. Reid, of this place, whose nephew, Lieut. James A. Carman, of the 107th Pennsylvania volunteers, was captured at Gettysburg, and is now in Libby Prison, Richmond, addressed a letter to the Rebel Commissioner of Exchange of Prisoners, Robert Ould, asking permission to send clothing to his relative, and also to our citizen prisoners from this place. The letter was forwarded through General S. A. Meredith, the Union Commissioner, who has re
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
's, who committed us at once to the Libby prison, and placed us on the second floor, among up wards of hundred Union prisoners, comprising and classes — lawyers, Quakers, butlers, farmers, and deserters from our ranks, many of them as marked as when they came into this world. The sight we beheld here was shocking. The dimensions of the room in which they were confined was forty feet by seventy, with an eight foot ceiling. It fronted on Cary street, with the rear on Canal, in sight of James river. As soon as we were ushered into this room we were besieged by these poor fellows with inquiries for the news from the North, and the particulars of the fights at Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and Charleston. After looking around on the floor for some line we found a spot, and laid down to get the rest we so much needed. It was impossible to keep at case or catch a nap while the vermin were literally devouring us. The older prisoners seemed to take it as a matter of course, and laid until mo
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): article 8
y the accompanying document that Mr. Ogden had forwarded the charges on the 12th of February, 1863. which caused my arrest and imprisonment. On the 13th of March I left Quebec with the intention of coming direct to New York; but was detained in Montreal by the illness of Mrs. Atwood's little daughter until the 30th of that month. On that day we left Montreal, and the next evening arrived in New York, and on the following Friday, (Good Friday,) April 3d, and only released last Tuesday, the 12thMontreal, and the next evening arrived in New York, and on the following Friday, (Good Friday,) April 3d, and only released last Tuesday, the 12th of May. Geo. W. Williamson. Consulate of the U. S. Of America. At Quebec, Ca., 12th Feb., 1863. To the Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State: Sir — I have the honor to furnish to your Department the following information, with an urgent request that the parties, immediately upon their arrival within the jurisdiction of the United States, receive the watchful care of the proper authorities: George W. Williamson, accompanied by a woman, represented to be his niece, named An
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 8
rs, and deserters from our ranks, many of them as marked as when they came into this world. The sight we beheld here was shocking. The dimensions of the room in which they were confined was forty feet by seventy, with an eight foot ceiling. It fronted on Cary street, with the rear on Canal, in sight of James river. As soon as we were ushered into this room we were besieged by these poor fellows with inquiries for the news from the North, and the particulars of the fights at Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and Charleston. After looking around on the floor for some line we found a spot, and laid down to get the rest we so much needed. It was impossible to keep at case or catch a nap while the vermin were literally devouring us. The older prisoners seemed to take it as a matter of course, and laid until morning in sound sleep, when our astonishment and disgust was intensified to see every man sitting up in bed hunting for the vermin in what little clothing he possessed. It was the regular
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
ccompanied by a woman, represented to be his niece, named Ann Atwood. They have been sojourning some time here, and purpose leaving Quebec on or about the 20th February, for Baltimore and Richmond. Said Williamson, daring his sojourn here, has rejoiced in the title of General. He says he holds his commission from the rebel Government. He formerly resided at Baltimore, Maryland. He intends remaining a few days in New York city. Ann Atwood expects to go to Richmond by the way of Fredericksburg, Virginia. She has a daughter about eight years of age. Williamson has a son in Stuart's rebel cavalry, holding a Captain's commission, and relatives in other rebel commands. A more shame-faced pair of rebels never moved in any sphere. They have been keeping up a continual correspondence with Richmond and other parts of the South during their stay here frequently boasting of the regularity of said communication being kept up in defiance of the United States Government. Willi
Aiken's Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
rs in silver for twenty in green backs. The offer was accepted by many. The next day a guard was detailed, which seized all the silver. This was the only way they could have secured the green backs. Ninety five per cent of Union prisoners go to Richmond well, except from exhaustion, caused by long marches. After a few days' confinement they become invalids. In the intervals between the flag of truce boats, which are only a few days, from two to three hundred sick accumulate at Aiken's Landing from the Richmond prisons. Not one-third of our prisoners at Belle Island have tents or shelter of any kind, though the nights are very cold, and a heavy fog settles on the river, continuing until ten o'clock in the morning. Our prisoners suffer more than they would otherwise on account of the tyranny of a man named Boss Burnham, formerly of New York, but a Southerner by birth. He was formerly doing business for a firm in Warren street. One prisoner was put in close confinement o
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): article 8
ed him, and had determined to return to the United States. In his statement he says: Upon mentioning to friends in Quebec my intention, I was informed that they had heard of charges having been forwarded to Washington against me (of a treasonaorwarded the charges on the 12th of February, 1863. which caused my arrest and imprisonment. On the 13th of March I left Quebec with the intention of coming direct to New York; but was detained in Montreal by the illness of Mrs. Atwood's little daug3d, and only released last Tuesday, the 12th of May. Geo. W. Williamson. Consulate of the U. S. Of America. At Quebec, Ca., 12th Feb., 1863. To the Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State: Sir — I have the honor to furnish to your Depby a woman, represented to be his niece, named Ann Atwood. They have been sojourning some time here, and purpose leaving Quebec on or about the 20th February, for Baltimore and Richmond. Said Williamson, daring his sojourn here, has rejoiced in the
United States (United States) (search for this): article 8
he (the General) need not ask the War Department to at his disposal, for that purpose, troops in the service of the United States. On the 3d of August Gov. Seymour replied, informing General Dix that he was in communication with the Presidenpressed a wish that the draft in this State should be executed without the employment of troops in the service of the United States, and that afterwards, by a letter addressed to Governor Seymour, he had renewed more formally the expression of this had spent the summer in Canada, with his niece, Mrs. Atwood, who accompanied him, and had determined to return to the United States. In his statement he says: Upon mentioning to friends in Quebec my intention, I was informed that they had heag information, with an urgent request that the parties, immediately upon their arrival within the jurisdiction of the United States, receive the watchful care of the proper authorities: George W. Williamson, accompanied by a woman, represented
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 8
ithin the jurisdiction of the United States, receive the watchful care of the proper authorities: George W. Williamson, accompanied by a woman, represented to be his niece, named Ann Atwood. They have been sojourning some time here, and purpose leaving Quebec on or about the 20th February, for Baltimore and Richmond. Said Williamson, daring his sojourn here, has rejoiced in the title of General. He says he holds his commission from the rebel Government. He formerly resided at Baltimore, Maryland. He intends remaining a few days in New York city. Ann Atwood expects to go to Richmond by the way of Fredericksburg, Virginia. She has a daughter about eight years of age. Williamson has a son in Stuart's rebel cavalry, holding a Captain's commission, and relatives in other rebel commands. A more shame-faced pair of rebels never moved in any sphere. They have been keeping up a continual correspondence with Richmond and other parts of the South during their stay here fre
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